Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I'm 99% sure that she belongs to London Underground, not the museum, both of which are parts of TfL, but there is an occasional visitor to RMWeb who will know for certain, having spent many years overseeing the TLC that is afforded this 'pet' loco.

 

K

Link to post
Share on other sites

The museum and heritage collections are accounted separately iirc. As Sarah Siddons is kept in main line condition it is not counted as part of the museum collection as iirc most of the items there will likely never run again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apart from the Q stock that is being restored to running condition, I happen to know an electrician who is working on it!

 

Dave Burleigh of the Model Railway Club was one of those who helped keep SS running over the years.  I'm probably one of the few who has been officially trained on a Met electric loco, being a guard at Ricky in 1973 we had a loco based there for leaf clearing and similar duties. I happened to learn on John Hampden. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC stock has been used on LU heritage events in the past few years or will be used in the near future:

  • LT Museum: 1938 Stock, Q Stock, Metropolitan carriage 353 and the Metropolitan Milk Van.
  • LU Heritage Fleet: Sarah Siddons, the 4TC set and the LMS Saloon 45029.
  • Stock owned by another person or group: Met 1, 1960 Stock, Metropolitan District carriage 100, the Chesham set, GWR 5521/L150, GWR 9466 and Class 20s 20142, 20189 & 20227.
Link to post
Share on other sites

"No. 12" is accounted for as part of TfL's capital fleet I believe and is not museum stock.  Whether or not she is still classed as a brake block test locomotive, which was the official reason she survived in the first place, I have no way of checking upon but she is available for traffic under certain conditions as opposed to being stuffed and mounted.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose that we must be grateful that TfL are taking a more relaxed view on excursions of Sarah Siddons (and Steam on the Met).  However, I cannot help but be disappointed by the incongruous combination of locos and carriage stock that are generally employed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

It might have been the only item of rolling stock owned by LU at that time, although I do wonder about the TC set ..... but, I'm not going to start a thread about which set of accounts that appears in!

 

Given that the museum is also part of TfL, and owns rather a lot of rolling stock, even if most of it hasn't rolled very far in many years, it almost certainly wasn't the only item of rolling stock owned by TfL at that time, though.

 

The milk van, which is used as a 'tender' on steam runs, does belong to the museum, but I don't think it was serviceable at the time in question. Ditto coach 353.

 

K

Link to post
Share on other sites

The rumours are right, during the PPP years Electric Locomotive No. 12 and the exBR Mk1 4TC set vehicles were the only railway rolling stock "Directly" owned by LU - note the initials - but they were under the care of Metronet SSL.

 

As indicated above TfL, as the overarching body, has many other rail vehicles including trams.

 

CH

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 years later...
  • 1 month later...
5 hours ago, rodent279 said:

What is there to test? Wear rates, braking efficiency?

 

Composition, different materials, varying grades and compositions of materials ..... plenty to test but not all that often.  However having a dedicated test loco avoids the need to pull an etire train out of passenger service for trials and - in this case - gives a good reason to retain a historic locomotive in semi-active condition.  

  • Agree 1
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, rodent279 said:

What is there to test? Wear rates, braking efficiency?

 

Composition, different materials, varying grades and compositions of materials, heating and heat-dissipation rates, effects of heat on brakes and wheels ..... plenty to test but not all that often.  However having a dedicated test loco avoids the need to pull an entire train out of passenger service for trials and - in this case - gives a good reason to retain a historic locomotive in semi-active condition.  

Edited by Gwiwer
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.