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You're right, you certainly like a challenge! What a great idea for a layout and certainly one which will keep your group occupied for some time to come. Looking forward to seeing this develop.

 

I have not come across those wagon kits before. Do they suggest/recommend chassis at all?

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The wagons are complete with solebars and buffer beams.  Eddie (the designer) recommends 2mm Association W-Irons.

 

We need to add buffers, W-irons, springs, axle boxes and brake gear.  We've sourced some etched LBSCR brass W-irons (with curved and straight side braces), and are working on springs, axle boxes, brake levers and blocks. There are some buffers from the 2mm Association which are quite close to the Stroudley design, but I keep forgetting which part number they are :(

 

Cheers,

Dave

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strangely when I saw this thread I thought of your excellent models and wondered if you where involved and converted to the 2mm dark-side 

 

it appears not

 

 

 

I think one of the problems that will be encountered with this project is the one I had, track. Back in the 1890's the trend was for the permanent way to be ballasted over the sleepers which needs to be reproduced but creates issues when modelling in this small size. I had initially considered 2mm code 40 track but once covered with even the finest layer of ballast the stock won't run as the flanges lift the wheels off the track. So 2mm was out so I reverted back to 'N' but even code 55 Peco track had the same problem. I never thought it would happen but I had to go back to code 80 and all is now fine :)

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I think one of the problems that will be encountered with this project is the one I had, track. Back in the 1890's the trend was for the permanent way to be ballasted over the sleepers which needs to be reproduced but creates issues when modelling in this small size. I had initially considered 2mm code 40 track but once covered with even the finest layer of ballast the stock won't run as the flanges lift the wheels off the track.

Thanks for the warning, I will need to try some experiments to see how this will affect us.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

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What an amazing project! I've looked at the photos in the Wild Swan "E.J. Bedford of Lewes" photo book and thought lustfully what a great layout it would make.

 

On the ballasting, take a look at TomE's Ropley - in the yard area outside the modern shed he's used Treemendus earth powders to ballast code 40 in a way that covers most of the sleepers.

 

I'll do my best to make it to the show - I'm only over in Croydon :)

 

Justin

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The trick with the track is to put fillers - plastic or card strips - between the sleepers so that there is little (or preferably) no height difference between the sleeper tops and the "ballast" top. Paint the ensemble with an appropriate gloss colour and sprinkle with a powder, also of an appropriate colour, while it is still wet. The rails will need cleaning up, of course, but that I have found that to be easier than it sounds.

 

The LBSCR used shingle ballast, typically from the Crumbles at Eastbourne, and a dark sand paint and a grey powder might prove the best colour combination, perhaps with some subsequent "dry-brushing" to highlight the powder texture. However, like all these things, it needs a bit of trialling to get it right, but it is certainly possible.

 

Incidentally, using the fillers, cut from equal width strips, makes sleeper spacing a doddle - and there is no need to glue them in, the gloss paint will fix them quite sufficiently.

 

Good luck with the project!

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Thanks for the warning, I will need to try some experiments to see how this will affect us.

 

Cheers,

 

Dave

 

I used a cheap small flat-blade screwdiver with tip filed to a wheel profile to remove stray ballast after ballasting and painting. This also has the advantage of removing paint from the inside top of the rail which I find a useful aid to better electrical pickup.

 

I need to smooth off some too coarse ballast on a 2mm industrial layout and my plan, not yet tried out I should caution, is to use coloured tile grout. Somewhere like Topps Tiles will have grout in many useful shades, greys, browns etc.

 

An interesting project.  I saw this at your open day last year.

 

Mark

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Excellent choice of location to model.

I used to live in Crowborough on the Uckfield line, which used to reach as far as Lewis before the nasty Dr Beeching came along, a decision much regretted with the BML now full to capacity.  The whole LS&SCR was a wonderful thing.
I wish you well with this project and will follow with interest

The attached photo shows one of through tracks now filled in

post-10866-0-99149100-1492371572_thumb.jpg

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I need to smooth off some too coarse ballast on a 2mm industrial layout and my plan, not yet tried out I should caution, is to use coloured tile grout. Somewhere like Topps Tiles will have grout in many useful shades, greys, browns etc.

 

 

Interesting idea Mark. I've got a small amount of BAL micromax "smoke" colour grout left over from when we had the downstairs loo refurbished. Were you thinking of applying it dry "like ballast" and wetting it to fix, or using glue to fix, or applying wet as a slurry "like grout" ? 

 

Justin

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Interesting idea Mark. I've got a small amount of BAL micromax "smoke" colour grout left over from when we had the downstairs loo refurbished. Were you thinking of applying it dry "like ballast" and wetting it to fix, or using glue to fix, or applying wet as a slurry "like grout" ? 

 

Justin

I'd recommend something like:

 

http://www.polycell.co.uk/product/polycell-plaster-repair-polyfilla-ready-mixed/

 

I used this for the scenery on Brafferton including all of the road/yard surfaces. Unlike most plasters or groups it is relatively soft when set and can be easily carved and cleaned up. Adding a fine abrasive or dusting it when laid would give a good representation of fine ballast. It takes colouring very well be it paint, stains or powders.

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Interesting idea Mark. I've got a small amount of BAL micromax "smoke" colour grout left over from when we had the downstairs loo refurbished. Were you thinking of applying it dry "like ballast" and wetting it to fix, or using glue to fix, or applying wet as a slurry "like grout" ? 

 

Justin

 

I'm going to try setting the grout powder in dry, then mist over with some wetted water using my airbrush. By co-incidence, I have exactly the same colour left over from our bathroom.

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........ some wetted water using my airbrush.......

I didn't know that there was such a thing as dry water! What do you use to wet it?

:-)

 

Jim

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Just sprinkle a little bit of dehydrated water on it.

That's hard to come by up here. Most of our water is pretty wet, especially the stuff that comes from the sky! :-/

 

Jim

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That's hard to come by up here. Most of our water is pretty wet, especially the stuff that comes from the sky! :-/

 

Jim

 

Same up my way, too!

 

What a wonderful project.  Very much look forward to watching it develop.

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Good to talk with you Dave and some of your colleagues earlier today at the excellent Epsom exhibition.

 

Good luck with this - all looked good what was on show today ;)

 

One to follow...

Edited by bcnPete
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Hi, it was good to meet several of you at the show and talk about our plans. We had lots of interest and many helpful comments and suggestions both from people who know Lewes and from modellers.

 

In particular, many 2mmFS modellers stopped to talk* and offer useful advice from their experience, which has been most encouraging.  We were given lots of practical suggestions and offers of help which we will now explore.

 

Many thanks,

 

Cheers,

Dave

 

*on their way to the excellent 'Lighterman's Yard'

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Hi Dave,

 

I've only just caught up with this thread, and it looks like I've missed your show.

 

Those wagons look great, thanks for the plug, I did wonder why I suddenly had a little flurry of sales!

 

Not much going on in development at the moment, plenty of non railway stuff happening, and a house move this year or next, but will get back to designing at some point.

 

Cheers,

 

Eddie.

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