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coachmann

CARROG in 4mm & Ruabon discussion...

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One of my favourite preserved stations Larry, following with anticipation.

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One of my favourites as well Larry, nice choice.

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Some very nice simple, but totally "fit for purpose" woodwork there!

 

3x1" (or 69 x18mm if one must) is ideal baseboard timber frame size IMO and the chop saw is just the tool to cut it with.

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Good morning Larry,I have this on my follow list now .................... even though it is in one of those smaller fiddler scales  :wink_mini:

 

Best regards

Craig.

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Hi Coachmann,

 

It's nice to see you modelling in "OO" again, will follow your thread with much interest.

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Well done Larry great to see your new project starting to break cover from the depths of winter .......it's an exciting time starting a new layout looking forward to following your progress......if you need any additional photo's or measurements I'm happy to pop down the road if required .................. :sungum:

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Will there be an option for a non-garden loop (as you had previously in the covered extension), should you choose to not want to use the full length of the line (inclement weather, for example) ?

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I'm biased in that my favourite preserved station is Highley, but Carrog looks a nice station and you have the flexibility of running (pretty much) whatever you want with no one complaining.

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Slightly off topic - but have you included for thermal insulation for the floor / walls / roof to avoid the extremes in temperatures in your shed?  Also sunlight can have a serious detrimental effect on the applied colours on the layout.  Suggest perhaps blinds or ultra violet film to the glass to the window wall.

 

But Carrog is an interesting location and the options are great for a Western Region and a later Llangollen Railway alternative for a variety of rolling stock and motive power.  

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A great start coach, I like nice sweeping curves and you have certainly achieved that, it always makes a layout appear larger to my eye.

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An Excellent start Larry, the flow of the curve is just about right and will add some real atmosphere to the Layout.

 

You have created exactly what I started with Trewithen, before scrapping it.

post-9335-0-36951600-1492638406_thumb.jpg

 

post-9335-0-85343900-1492638425_thumb.jpg

 

Edited by Andrew P
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Looking really well Coachman.

You really get stuck in don't you, before you know it, it'll be just about built.

I called in at Llangollen dinner time today, on my way back from Dapol after picking up my B-Set, to be treated to one of the best locos ever produced (Obviously with GWR heritage) leaving as sure footed as ever with a Corwen service, via Carrog!!!

 

45337 sitting in the platform waiting to depart.

Picture quality a bit suss, 8 x zoom on my phone!!!

 

post-14906-0-61900100-1492637564_thumb.jpg

 

 

And here is some video I took of her pulling away, as I know you like to hear different locos at work.

 

 

 

 

Jinty ;)

 

 

 

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Thanks Jinty'. Interesting to see the RH drain cock is still 'blowing'. The Black Five is the regular engine at the moment. 

 

 

You have created exactly what I started with Trewithen, before scrapping it.

 

What a shame you did not pursue this idea.........It looked an interesting project.

Edited by coachmann

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1/16" cork was cut into strips ¾" wide and laid under the outer edge of the embankment then it was firmly screwed down along the inner edge. To the eye it seems as if nothing has happened but the spirit level soon confirmed a camber, first to the right then to the left as it snaked towards the shed doorway. Placing a coach on some track also showed it was working....

 

post-6680-0-76499000-1492718141.jpg

post-6680-0-14264200-1492718143.jpg

 

However, he station loop section on the flat baseboard was not as easy. 1/16" cork somewhat less than double track width was glued down with neat PVA and then weighted with timber and books. When dry, an electric sander was used to put a camber across it until the inner edge was like tissue. This was incredibly dusty work and if i were to do it again i would use the open frame method....

post-6680-0-99510700-1492718143.jpg

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To add a little to the above post, double tracks usually had individual cambers and this can be detected in the first picture in post #1. Seeing as I use the glue, lay & ballast in one go method, individual cambers are difficult to place weights on and so my cheating is for good reason. Later on today I will be gluing 1/8" cork on top of the 1/16" 'footings' as well as on the plywood embankment. This is probably the least interesting part of layout building, but at least it brings track-laying ever closer. That said, making the station buildings will be the least interesting part as far as I am concerned.  I should take up chequebook modelling.... :mocking_mini:

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Good to see you back in the shed, Larry and that your "specs on the layout in photos" trademark is still alive and well.

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Really looking forward to this, the speed and quality of your layout building is just amazing and I always learn a lot from them.

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Really looking forward to this, the speed and quality of your layout building is just amazing and I always learn a lot from them.

That is gratifying to know because i did have doubts about illustrating the early parts like building the baseboard.

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The whole of the widened part of the baseboard was covered in cork as this allows me more freedom when placing tracks in the goods yard. Today, the tracks were laid out as close as possible to their final position. This took up all morning but because ail joiners could not be used between the Code 75 bullhead and the Code 83 points, there were great difficulties in keeping everything lined up. In the end I ditched the points and used Code 75's instead all joined together with Peco SL-110 and SL-111 rail joiners. The vertical web of the bullhead rail is slightly thicker than rail used by other manufacturers and this means the rail joiners really do grip the bullhead rail.....

 

post-6680-0-33515900-1492889675.jpg

 

Switch blades masked off ready for spraying the track with Railmatch Sleeper Grime....

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