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  • RMweb Gold

To help people who haven't read the book decide whether they'd like to get involved or not, here is a quick guide to the key points that Iain believes "makes" a Cameo layout, all taken from the book.

 

A Cameo Layout is one where:

 

  • The 3D modelled scene is combined with a 2D backdrop.
  • Complementary fascias, wings and other display aids set off the modelled scene.
  • Carefully considered and built in lighting provides natural illumination for the modelled scene.
  • Necessary offstage areas or staging tracks are built in to the layout.
  • Support structures display the model at a "natural" viewing height.
  • Necessary electrical and mechanical "gubbins" are built in to the layout.

In summary, the underlying criteria are that it should be easy on the eye, easy to move, and require only a single plug to power it.

 

The book is readily available from all decent railway booksellers, here is a link to its description and details on my own website:

 

http://titfield.co.uk/Shop.htm

 

Simon Castens

 

 

 

 

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Isn't that most layouts?

 

If you build in lighting how is it "natural illumination"?

 

What's a "natural viewing height"?

 

Where do those criteria define that it must be easy to move and require only a single plug...?

 

I'm far more perplexed than before I read this. I'd assume a cameo layout to be essentially a working diorama - a very small layout focused on a very specific scene in which there happened to be a railway.

Edited by njee20
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  • RMweb Gold

Isn't that most layouts?

If you build in lighting how is it "natural illumination"?

What's a "natural viewing height"?

Where do those criteria define that it must be easy to move and require only a single plug...?

I'm far more perplexed than before I read this. I'd assume a cameo layout to be essentially a working diorama - a very small layout focused on a very specific scene in which there happened to be a railway.

Seems pretty straightforward to me. If you read the book, all will be blindingly clear.

 

Jerry

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If it gets people building finescale layouts then does it really matter,

I don't think there is any requirement for "finescale" - whatever that is, exactly.

 

...R

Edited by Robin2
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It's a can of worms.

 

So, let me get this straight. The "natural" viewing height is that which one gets by standing on a can of worms? Would a can of beans also work?

Edited by Kylestrome
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It's good to stimulate discussion and this Cameo project certainly has.

 

Apologies for using the word finescale but I was taking this from the article in Model Railway Journal which states "The modelling is executed to a high standard 'small but exquisite ' favouring finescale wheel and track standards and a high level of detail"

 

With the new Peco bullhead track available realism can be achieved with a bit of care and patience. Always look at photos of the real railway, all you are doing is making a copy in miniature, colours, textures etc. Take a picture of your work, does it look convincing?

 

Think about how you can improve your model making skills by sharing your work in progress with the group and the project will benefit.

 

My entry will be coming soon, and yes I shall be setting up a post so you can see the progress.

 

Paul

Edited by PUASHP
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Isn't that most layouts?

 

 

So basically how we've all been building them for years!

 

 

the 6 bullet points in Post #1 pretty much describe any model railway layout anywhere. I have to ask... what's new?

 

I have to disagree with these points; I can't really start to count the number of layouts I see at shows and at folk's homes in the course of a year and there's very few I'd regard as a 'cameo'; smallish, well-executed, inspiring, really well-framed and presented with interesting content, stock, well-lit and staged. The word 'staged' is, I feel, important as it is a bit of theatre which presents a scene and removes all of the real-world references from the viewing position. Simon's framework in the OP is more a description of some elements which would be necessary to achieve what could be regarded as a cameo.

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"The modelling is executed to a high standard 'small but exquisite ' favouring finescale wheel and track standards and a high level of death"

 

 

I knew there'd be a catch.

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What about a rail served, worm canning factory?

 

Mike

 

Or a rail served wheelchair factory, of course modelled at a height where no-one using the appliance in question can see what is going on without a periscope.

 

I have fallen for the cameo design before, and have built and exhibited some layouts which while maybe not going to Iain Rice's extremes of staging, have been appropriately framed and set at a height which I at 6'7" can comfortably operate standing up. Unfortunately I have found that this style of exhibiting excludes many disabled and younger visitors to shows.

 

I'm all for taking the artistic side of railway modelling seriously, but to do so by excluding even a small proportion of our prospective audience, especially those who we would like to encourage to take the art-form forward into a new generation, is to my mind extremely short sighted. I feel that MRJ in promoting the 'cameo' display style as somehow superior are adding to the problem rather than helping to encourage others to test their own skills.

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Nobody, Simon nor Iain, is claiming this to be a new concept. Iain has written about the idea over several years, a good few cameo style layouts have been built, they are not overly common.

 

If you don't understand the concept buy the book.

 

If you don't want to buy the book, or do and still don't understand it, then I suspect the competition is not for you.

 

Sweet Jesus, the guys have just set up a competition based on the themes in the book. Yes, it'll sell them a few more books, good for them, they've both served the hobby well over many years and deserve it. If you're not interested, don't understand it, fine,leave it to those who might get some satisfaction out of it.

 

Anymore of this nonsense and there'll be another Hitler parody....

 

Hmmm

 

.

.

Edited by Arthur
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Nobody, Simon nor Iain, is claiming this to be a new concept. Iain has written about the idea over several years, a good few cameo style layouts have been built, they are not overly common.

If you don't understand the concept buy the book.

If you don't want to buy the book, or do and still don't understand it, then I suspect the competition is not for you.

Sweet Jesus, the guys have just set up a competition based on the themes in the book. Yes, it'll sell them a few more books, good for them, they've both served the hobby well over many years and deserve it. If you're not interested, don't understand it, fine,leave it to those who might get some satisfaction out of it.

Anymore of this nonsense and there'll be another Hitler parody....

Hmmm

.

.

So, are you in, or out ?

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Out, I don't understand the concept.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No, I'm in and will give it a go, sound like a bit of fun and I'll get something built.

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