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Nicely restrained, Mike.

Knowing when to stop is half the battle with weathering!

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36 minutes ago, Furness Wagon said:

Very nice not envous at all.

Marc

...me neither.

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Absolutely zero modelling done over the last 3 weeks and none likely for the next 5 or 6 weeks as well. 

Even Thomas and friends have made an inroad in to the collection.

The workshop has been taken over for the storage of toys and other items so that the spare bedrooms can revert back to there original functions for the returning daughters and grandchildren.

At least I have a pass out for Telford. 

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I hope Percy has been re-gauged to S7, we can't let the standards slip.....

Edited by Argos
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I have had an hour to myself today as all the family have been doing different things. My better half has gone to hospital after her operation on her hand and all the girls / grandchildren have gone shopping / entertaining.

So I was going through some pictures on my tablet when I came across one of the tank top on a chopper tank. 

I had made the top of my model quite plain without any detail because I could not find information about it. 

Now I had a picture I feel I have to revisit my model and try and incorporate this detail. 

The edge of the tank has a raised lip all around with a couple of lines of bolts at the front end. 

Rather than take all the tank apart to provide this detail I have decided to see if I can add an overlay of thin nickel sheet on top and just renew the front part only. 

I cut a piece of nickel to size and bent up one edge to see if this is going to be a runner or not. 

Not having much time to find my metal stock I have used a piece of nickel which is to thick but it does give me an indication that the idear will work. I will have to cut a bit of angle to form the back edge of the tank, but that should not be a problem. 

I have marked with a blue pencil where the bolts will be. I still have a small stock of Scale Hardware brass bolts which will do.

When I get time ( probably after Telford ) I will find my stock of the correct  material  and have a go at adding this missing detail.

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Tuesday night was quite eventful with very little sleep with the arrival of our latest grandson in the early hours. 

But it has given me a few hours modelling time today because all the femails have gone shopping again for gifts / presents / baby clothes etc etc. The fact that they had already bought things before this new addition came along doesn't matter. But I'm not brave enough to mention any of that.

 

Anyway I have found my stock of sheet metal in the workshop. 

I have made a new tank top and folded a lip on the back edge and side after scribing with my Olfa cutter.

i also made a new front panel for the tank but rather than solder this to the tank I have soldered it to the sand box which is screwed on. I have drilled holes for the bolts in both parts but as yet I haven't soldered any on.

 

The 1mm x1mm square  brass rod was used as a filing jig to gauge the height of the lip on the tank top.

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Many congrats on the new grandson - and I agree, best leave the ladies to their shopping...!

Good work on the loco, I wish my metal work was half as good as this.

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Yesterday the postman brought me a new book from the LNWR society. And what a fabulous book it is. 

For any one wishing to model the Victorian era and the LNWR in particular it is a must. 

The book is about a railway worker from a long forgotten time working very long hours at a time when the health and safety brigade were not invented.

The book is illustrated with large format photographs that are clear and well printed. I have seen a lot of them before but not all together in one place and there some new to me. A couple of an accident at Leek  Wooton near Kenilworth are magnificent with some early wagons in great distress.

 

I have not been in the workshop while all the family visit but I have secured a pass out to Telford for the GOG meet providing I am back home early on Sunday for a large family gathering. 

 

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The Leek Wootton accident photos are also online on the Warwickshire Railways website. One doesn't often find a LNWR D1 photographed from this angle. Emphasises just how rounded the corner plates were.

Edited by Compound2632
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Compound2632, 

Thank you for the link to the Warwickshire Railway website. I have seen a couple of good photographs on the LNWR society's forum of early goods yards at Coventry with open roof cattle wagons from this website so I wonder what else is available to us who model early wagons. 

The angle of the photograph in the link you provided of the D1 show that this has been converted from a dumb buffer wagon with self contained parallel buffers. I will put this on the long list of wagons still to make.

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1 hour ago, Compound2632 said:

The Leek Wootton accident photos are also online on the Warwickshire Railways website. One doesn't often find a LNWR D1 photographed from this angle. Emphasises just how rounded the corner plates were.

Oops.

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I see they've also credited me with my 1:24 signal box...

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2 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

The Leek Wootton accident photos are also online on the Warwickshire Railways website. One doesn't often find a LNWR D1 photographed from this angle. Emphasises just how rounded the corner plates were.

 

I see they've put the brake on...

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1 minute ago, Worsdell forever said:

 

I see they've put the brake on...

A very wise precautionary measure...who says Health & Safety wasn't around in them days?

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1 hour ago, airnimal said:

The angle of the photograph in the link you provided of the D1 show that this has been converted from a dumb buffer wagon with self contained parallel buffers. I will put this on the long list of wagons still to make.

 

Good spot! I'd missed that. The headstock doesn't extend the full width. On reflection, I think the corner plate has a rather larger radius than later construction - which from the GA drawing in LNWR Wagons is about 2". 

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9 hours ago, airnimal said:

Yesterday the postman brought me a new book from the LNWR society. And what a fabulous book it is. 

For any one wishing to model the Victorian era and the LNWR in particular it is a must. 

The book is about a railway worker from a long forgotten time working very long hours at a time when the health and safety brigade were not invented.

The book is illustrated with large format photographs that are clear and well printed. I have seen a lot of them before but not all together in one place and there some new to me. A couple of an accident at Leek  Wooton near Kenilworth are magnificent with some early wagons in great distress.

 

I have not been in the workshop while all the family visit but I have secured a pass out to Telford for the GOG meet providing I am back home early on Sunday for a large family gathering. 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/image.jpeg.daff20d8a458192290424f01a5261438.jpeg

 

I read this post on the journey home home from work and thought "I must track down a copy of that", closely followed by "I don't remember the LNWR Society advertising that book".

 

On arriving home I found a book shaped box awaiting me. On opening this book fell out.

"I don't remember ordering that thinks I, must be getting old......never mind"

 

Only after spending half an hour flicking though did I check the rest of the package to find it was provided free to all member of the LNWR Society with the quarterly journal.

Worth the membership fee on it's own!

 

A really interesting book with lots of early LNWR photos, some of which I've not seen published.

I'm looking forward to a good read!

 

Definitely recommended!

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Arrived here too. Looking at the Leek Wootton photos - which are practically the only ones showing goods wagons - plate 33 (also on Warwickshire Railways), a couple more things caught my eye. The D1 wagon (or perhaps one should say pre-D1) has a tie rod between its axleguards. Also unlike the later D1 wagons, there is no sign of the external side knees on the body plank but there are vertical pieces of ironwork on the solebar at the position one would expect to find the knees. I speculate that these continue up to support the body plank from inside the wagon. Upside-down on the engine boiler are the remains of a dumb-buffered loco coal wagon - the familiar lettering LOCO is present, painted rather than cut-out and with a full stop after. Under that are the initials S.D - so at this date, loco coal wagons were allocated to specific divisions. The ironwork on both wagons appears darker than the woodwork, raising the old question of whether grey with black ironwork is the early livery, or is the difference just due to different weathering of the materials?

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1 hour ago, airnimal said:

 He was aloud out to go to Telford 

 

 

I wondered what the noise was.

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Thanks meil. As most people reading my post will be aware I have suffered with dyslexia all my life. I used to shy away from social situations were it would be apparent that I was assumed I was a dunce. But now  having brought up 3 daughters who have  6 degrees between I don't think I have anything to be ashamed of. I left school at 15 but I didn't go much in the last 3 years because I struggled with English. I had months of English lessons in my 40's without any improvement so I gave up and accepted that I was thick.

Perhaps I should just provide pictures without words in future.

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Whilst a picture speaks a thousand words, I for one would regret not having your descriptions of your techniques.

 

For myself, I've long been a reflexive pedant - I wince when I hear "less" in place of "fewer" for countable nouns - but have learnt, I hope, to keep it in check. I am even beginning to learn not to pass comment at pristine PO wagons on layouts with a 1950s setting.

 

But I do like the choice of wagons to sneak into your shots of your new Pug.

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I mentally blamed autocorrect. I've never noticed any problems with any of your writings and would miss any reduction in output. 

Alan 

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