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Finally finished bar the axleboxes and springs that will be fitted after the  painting. I put the capping strip on top of the body from 5 thou cut from Evergreen sheet. The body is looking very grubby because the pencil marks have rubbed graphite into the body.

What to do next ? 

I went through my box of wagon bits and was surprised to find I have over 40 sets of wagon buffers from different companies. The idea that you buy little packets of casting when you see them at exhibitions when there are available because they come and go and may disappear from the market. 

I suppose this is my equivalent of the pile of loco kits behind the door.

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While reorganising part of my workshop I decided to sort out the component storage area.  Lo and behold I discovered that I have sets of wheels for over 20 locomotives! I better get a move on and get the locos built before I fall from the tree.

 

Ian.

 

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1 hour ago, [email protected] said:

While reorganising part of my workshop I decided to sort out the component storage area.  Lo and behold I discovered that I have sets of wheels for over 20 locomotives! I better get a move on and get the locos built before I fall from the tree.

Pity the locos will most likely be green ones, but you can't have everything!  :devil: :jester:

 

Jim

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I've managed to get some paint on this wagon yesterday in a break between the rain. All I have to do now is paint the interior and letter it. 

Ian, I am with you on getting a move on in building stuff before I move on to pastures new. Finding the axleboxes and springs for this build revealed another 10 sets of wagon buffers in another bits box. Perhaps I need to speak to someone but then I look again when I look around when I go out, there are a lot of people with more problems than myself. 

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First coat of paint on the letters. I will have to let harden for a few hours before going over it again, building up the thickness and correcting any errors.

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Very nicely done.  Paint running into the plank lines is always a problem when hand lettering.

 

Jim

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Jim, yes paint running into the plank lines is a problem. Another problem is using the paint very thin to build up the density of the colour on the rough surface, the paint runs off line.

I have given it a second coat of paint this morning and drawn up a rough outline on the second side. 

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I have been trying to build up the paint on the letters but the more coats I put on the edge of the letters becomes  less crisp. I also tried to paint the small letters on but this looks terrible. I will have to remove these and try and find some transfers.

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Hi Airnimal,

 

Could you not just cut some masking tape for the T and L then blast with primer again? 

This would restore the edges. You'd only need to do the section of the wagon with this lettering.

 

 

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Perhaps you could get some white decal paper and actually cut the letters from it?

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One technique used by aeromodellers is to spray the colour of the letters or symbol; then apply decals - either cut by hand or dry-print letters - as a mask; then spray body colour; then strip away the decals. This gives a nice, flat, painted-on appearance for the markings.

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13 hours ago, Guy Rixon said:

One technique used by aeromodellers is to spray the colour of the letters or symbol; then apply decals - either cut by hand or dry-print letters - as a mask; then spray body colour; then strip away the decals. This gives a nice, flat, painted-on appearance for the markings.

 

I tried this technique when I wanted blue tare weight lettering on a yellow ground. I painted the area where the lettering was to go blue, then applied some Broad Gauge Society rub-down transfers that were in the script style I wanted - these are white transfers. After overpainting with yellow and letting everyting harden, it was fairly straightforward to remove the transfers - I think I may even have used a clean eraser:

 

691140224_CadburyNo_79.JPG.5e7daa0868f875320bcf88e5082cf9b3.JPG

 

I think the result was just about passable - I'm sure it would work better with larger transfers. (The main lettering is Hornby's factory printing.)

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12 hours ago, Dave Hunt said:
  • How do you strip away the decals?

 

all too easily, I find. If light physical abrasion doesn't work, and you can't lift an edge with a scalpel blade, then try meths perhaps. Not tried it myself, but then I'm usually trying to keep the b*ggers on!

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Thanks to everyone who has responded to this post. I am afraid I am old fashioned when trying to letter wagons with a brush. I don't think I could cut letters accurate enough from decal paper but I may try masking tape to sharpen up the letters. 

I have started the other side with the first coat of paint on. I still have to paint the iron work black and the interior a dirty wood colour.

I went back to Olham Library on Saturday to see the original large wall of photos from Olham Glegg St goods yard and was surprised to see that they have redone this collection again. 

I was told because where it has been placed that the light had bleached a lot of the previous prints to all most nothing. This latest version is smaller but some of the prints have been enhanced and some of the wagons are now a lot clearer. 

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I've tried to paint the interior woodwork with my usual mix of Humbrol Matt pale cream with a Matt Black wash over when dry. I never get this right to my satisfaction no matter how many times I do this. I find trying to paint bare wood one life's great mysteries.

I still have to paint all the ironwork Black both inside and out. 

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Just a suggestion, but try a thin wash of “gunmetal”. Metallic version will give things a sheen of well-weathered wood

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All I can say is 'that looks b****y good' !!!

 

Jim

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19 hours ago, Regularity said:

Just a suggestion, but try a thin wash of “gunmetal”. Metallic version will give things a sheen of well-weathered wood

 

Yes, old wood needs something grey washing over it.

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Precision Weathered Wood is quite good for weathered wood - believe it or not....!! As a wash. 

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Probably "started out black" ironwork on the inside? I do like these 4-plank dumb buffered wagons. Now the Midland liked them so much they bought up 66,000 of them... The collieries went straight out and spent the money on nice new sprung buffered RCH 1887 specification wagons!

Edited by Compound2632

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