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I usually view this topic on my phone but yesterday I was on my laptop when that collection of three wagons popped up, each filling the screen. Absolutely stunning models. Such attention to detail and careful measuring has really paid off.

 

I've seen some gauge 1 and gauge 3 wagons built by craftsmen and if I didn't know the scale you work in I would have assumed it was one of those.

 

You're not quite there in lettering to a standard that matches the build. That said it's more than good enough and better than I could do.

 

I think it's going to be a case of lots of practice and maybe trying different techniques or paints. Look at some of your early builds and see how far you've come in that regard and then be confident that your lettering will take a similar path.

 

Your accounts of your work is uplifting and inspiring. 

 

Best wishes 

Alan 

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12 hours ago, Buhar said:

I usually view this topic on my phone but yesterday I was on my laptop when that collection of three wagons popped up, each filling the screen. Absolutely stunning models. Such attention to detail and careful measuring has really paid off.

 

I've seen some gauge 1 and gauge 3 wagons built by craftsmen and if I didn't know the scale you work in I would have assumed it was one of those.

 

You're not quite there in lettering to a standard that matches the build. That said it's more than good enough and better than I could do.

 

I think it's going to be a case of lots of practice and maybe trying different techniques or paints. Look at some of your early builds and see how far you've come in that regard and then be confident that your lettering will take a similar path.

 

Your accounts of your work is uplifting and inspiring. 

 

Best wishes 

Alan 

I agree with most of your sentiments. 
I would say though that the lettering is far above average. Sure there are a few who can do better, and I mean a very few,  however having tried doing my own, and I think I am a reasonable modeler, I would say that the lettering is in the great category. They is space above that for astounding but it is way above average.

richard 

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1 hour ago, richard i said:

I agree with most of your sentiments. 
I would say though that the lettering is far above average. Sure there are a few who can do better, and I mean a very few,  however having tried doing my own, and I think I am a reasonable modeler, I would say that the lettering is in the great category. They is space above that for astounding but it is way above average.

richard 

I wouldn't disagree, Richard. But the modelling standard @airnimal has achieved is exceptional. The lettering is merely very good indeed. 

Alan 

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I finally admitted defeat after attempting to improve my sign writing skills.

I had several more goes but in the end I have accepted a coat of grime will have to do.

This is a disappointment but how many times can you rub off the letters before the underlying paint work gets worn through.

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I have done the other side tonight before I distress it and weather it tomorrow.

After that it's just the couplings to fit and a bit more dirt inside. 

I also mended a dancing Reindeer for one of my grandsons. My children and grandchildren think grandad can fix everything. I hate to disappoint them so I cut open said Reindeer and performed open heart surgery before sewing him up again. He made a full recovery to the delightful squeals from a happy 2 year old.

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I am trying to fit the numberplates to all the LNWR wagons that Chris Brown did for me. I have been trying to complete the numbers on the end as well as other lettering that need doing. 

One small annoying point is that wagons made 4 years ago are not quite up to the standard of wagon built today. 

This pair of bolsters wagons have not had there wheels cleaned up or the 3 link chains have not been soldered. It may be only little points but it does show I have improved a little over the last 4 years. 

I am finding my hands are getting less nimble as well as my eyesight is less sharp.

My wife wants me to have a new super mobile phone for my next birthday present in a few weeks time but I have opted for some better head magnifying glasses. This hasn't go down well but I very rarely use the simple phone I have now but I use my head magnifying glasses all the time.

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Mike,

 

I have an optivisor and am now using it for all my modelling instead of just on fiddly bits. One of the downsides of age! 
 

However I also have a a fancy phone which does get used quite a bit but not to the detriment of the modelling time! This reply is being typed on the phone  because it is handy to do while I finish my after dinner coffee in front of the tv news.

 

Ian.

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Optivisors rule, OK?

 

Like the good Mr. Middleditch I can't  get by  when modelling these days without using one. Whilst that is a downside of getting ancient, I tend to agree with Michael Caine who, when asked in an interview how he viewed being (I think) 75 replied, "Well, considering the alternative, it's not bad really."

 

Dave

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I think the lettering on the Wigan Junction wagon is fine. It may be a top professional could do marginally better, but really, I'd be absolutely delighted if I could get anywhere near that standard. Having attempted to hand letter wagons on odd occasions, usually when transfers have failed, I know how flipping difficult it is. Ideally one needs to be a trained artist who has studied calligraphy, and that rules me out.

 

Having said that, it's obvious from this thread that you set very high standards for yourself, which is admirable.

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Brian, many thanks for your endorsement. I am sure if I keep practising the lettering I will get better but old age is getting nearer and that doesn't help.

I have returned to this old Midland wagon to have a third attempt at it. I was going to start from scratch but in the end decided to go with the last underframe. It has still been a struggle with marking out and I don't seem able to get the consistancy I used to have. 

I was going to use a etched V-iron from my bits box that I believe was from a Cambrian wagon but when I compared it to the drawing it wasn't quite right so I cut another one from a bit of nickel.

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You may be afflicted with age problems as you claim, but from where I'm sitting that is still pretty damned good modelling. A very enjoyable thread.

 

  

Edited by Malcolm 0-6-0
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1 hour ago, airnimal said:

Malcolm 0-6-0, I am struggling with marking out in particular but also my hands don't seem cope with tiny parts like they use too. I am forever on my hands and knees looking for small parts that have escaped my grasp. I have trouble seeing if parts are central when I apply them. Everthing appears to be offset when I look from another direction so I have hold everything up to eye level and turn it around and look from all 4 corners to get everything true. 

 

 

 

Yes I am at that stage to - anything I drop becomes a nightmare to retrieve, my knees and back just aren't up to crawling around looking for small things. Still your modelling is a delight to watch.

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I continue to follow your posts in awe of modelling skills demonstrated and explained in a very approachable way.  As I also spend a measurable amount of every day hunting for things on the workshop floor, experimenting with magnifiers that clip on, fall off, poke me in the eye or refuse to allow me to focus at all and find my fingers don't follow instructions like they used to, I appreciate your achievements even more. 

Kit PW

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 Not a lot of progress today because of domestic duties including fixing the 11 year old washing machine. Earned a few brownie points there. And then got a rocket for not cleaning behind it while her in doors is at work ! I mean how often do people remove fixed items for cleaning ? Wasn't even that bad, just a bit dusty. Can we ever win.

 

I have packed up the w-irons with 20 thou plasticard because it was sitting a bit to low and changed the solid spoke wheels for split spoke ones. Started to add the bolt heads and made the first of the couplings. Still plenty to do.

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Is there anything more silly than cutting up hundreds of tiny cubes of plastic to represent bolts. It's one of those jobs I can do sometimes but I have to be in the mood. I get to the point when I have done one side and then realise I still have the other side and the complete interior to do that spirits dwindle.

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14 minutes ago, airnimal said:

and the complete interior to do

 

Can I offer the comforting idea that, if the construction of this 1860s wagon was like that of later Midland wagons, the bolt-heads on the inside were countersunk so flush with the interior ironwork and not visible?

 

On the other hand, what we see on the outside [Midland Wagons Vol. 1 plate 34] are square nuts with the ends of the bolts protruding...

Edited by Compound2632
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30 minutes ago, airnimal said:

Is there anything more silly than cutting up hundreds of tiny cubes of plastic to represent bolts. It's one of those jobs I can do sometimes but I have to be in the mood. I get to the point when I have done one side and then realise I still have the other side and the complete interior to do that spirits dwindle.

 

Yes, well just as silly, cutting up row after row of individual paper squares to be used as slates on a roof. The thing to bear in mind is that once it is done, it is done, and if one is sensible need not be repeated. I always cut a few (hundred extras) just to be sure. :nea:

 

BTW are your bolt heads cut from the end of a square rod section or cut from strip section. I would imagine the latter would be less tedious and avoid the dreaded pinging off of plastic into the great unknown.  

 

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