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S7 scratch building


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The NSR wagon book states that these wagon had " through train pipes ". 

I don't have a very technical mind set to understand much regarding brakes. I am just a simple model maker and not much else. I much prefer a simple wooden brake block acting on one wheel. I don't do modern !

 

I have drilled both ends for these white metal pipes and cut a length of brass tube to connect them together.  Before I glue them and paint them can anyone say if this is right or not. 

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A through piped wagon means just that.  The brake pipe ran through the wagon, but didn't activate the brakes.

 

Superb work as always, Mike.

 

Jim

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Posted (edited)

I have decided to paint the pipe with black from a rattle can. I won't glue it yet just in case I have repaint it later. I came to fit the buffer heads only to find the cast buffer bodies had been drilled off centre. I bought them at an exhibition years ago already drilled and wasn't expecting them to be drilled by hand. I wished I had checked them before I glued them to the body. I may still replace them because they are not good quality with poor bolts lacking any definition.  The only thing I could do was turn a small brass sleeve and to counteract the offset and glue them in. They are not perfect but they are better than they were because one was pointing up and one was pointing down.

I have still to make up the screw couplings and then weather everything.

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Edited by airnimal
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 I have decided to make replacement buffer bodies even if I don't use them. I have a bag of solid white metal buffers that I have cut the heads off and drilled to accept steel heads. I have drilled them in the lathe so they will run true. I have cut the blobs of metal that were meant to represent bolts and will replace them with Masterclub bolts. I could have turned brass bodies but being lazy I will use these bits rather than throwing them away.

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36 minutes ago, airnimal said:

Looking at the photograph in the NSR wagon book of this cattle wagon taken at Market Drayton shows it heavily lime washed around the bars but not much on the solebars.

 

I think that's right. The limewash was applied inside the wagon and leaked out through the grills or slats, so would drip over the side rail but the solebars would be in "shadow". Some dripping onto the axleboxes through, perhaps? I think there's just a hint of that on the one axlebox visible in the Market Drayton photo?

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I thought I had finished but when I glued the pipes on the ends and the brass tube joining them together but I found the tube to be vulnerable to handling.  So I glued some 60 thou black plasticard underneath to form a channel to protect the tube. It's not noticeable from normal viewing angles so I can live with it. I have fitted the screw couplings as well. I am not sure if they are of the right type but they are all I have. 

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While my better half decides what colour she want the rooms painting and which one first, I managed to slip out for the day to source new parts for forthcoming projects.  

I had run out of wagon and coach wheels so I had a run out to Slaters at Darley Dale to pick up supplies.  I spent a very agreeable hour sitting out side the works talking railways with David White and a couple of his staff. 

 

So I have stocked up on wheels and axles plus I came away with a brass casting for a Manning Wardle fluted safety valve to go on my little industrial tank. David said he has hardly sold any of these which surprised me because of how popular these little locos are. 

 

Anyway I got out of painting today which was a bonus. 

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Posted (edited)

I am pleased with my parts from Slaters today as well as the natter with David White. 

I decided that I wouldn't start any bid modelling jobs but a little play wouldn't do any harm. 

So I cleaned up the safety valve and polished the top before dunking the lower section in Birchwood chemical black. A quick rub with a cotton bud and it looks brilliant. 

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Edited by airnimal
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You might have to go back to Darley Dale - the 3'7" spoked coach wheels (7127) are FS not S7! Or was that deliberate?

Dave

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Some people don't miss a thing. 

 

Funny you should say that because that's what I had to do.   I picked up the parts and left and went for a coffee just down the road. I sat with my drink and had a look at my parts only to find David had given me a set of  S7 3' 6" wagon wheels. I had ordered 10 sets of S7 wheels and one set of F/S wheels. 

One set is for a  friend who has not yet seen the light. 

 

 

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Until the Lady decides what colour she wants the rooms painting, it would be be rude not to utilize the time to tinker in the workshop. 

 

Taking the plastic saftey valve off leaves a large hole in the top of the firebox. Unfortunately the new brass casting doesn't cover completely over this hole. So I cut a piece of 10 thou black plasticard out to cover over the space. This I then screwed to the saftey  valve with a 12 BA but and bolt. Later when the good Lady has arisen from her slumber and had breakfast, I will paint this round part with the green body colour. 

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Despite saying I am not going to start anything new until after the dec...............

My good lady has gone to lunch with the girls leaving me with strict instructions not to start anything household without her permission.  Well would I ever ?

 

It would be rude to disagree  so I had a look at the etchings that came this morning to see how easy or hard it would be to do the riveting. Before I started to emboss the rivets , I pre rolled the curved top plate to the shape of the ends.  I cautiously tried a scrap piece of nickel of nearly the same thickness to gauge the depth of the rivets mindful of the the piece I was using hadn't got the half etch dimples. The test piece went well so with heart in my mouth I set off on the tank top. There was a little hiccup near the start where I didn't quite support the sheet enough which has made a little ripple but I think it will it will be fine with a bit of attention.  There is just the matter of the several hundred more to do now with the same level of success.  Easier said than done. 

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The "bigger" rivet in the middle of the top plate is to mark the centre of the piece so giving you a start when thinking about the filler.

 

What wagon diagrams go with the LNWR plates?

 

best wishes, Graham

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Well after getting off to a good start everything went down hill rather rapidly.  A couple of misplaced rivets were never going to be easy to disguise on a wagon so plain. So I decided to file the ones off that I had already done and drill out to take Masterclub rivets. This is going to be a long job. I tried some .6mm rivets but they looked a bit weedy. So I have used a larger diameter drill and will use .7mm ones instead. 

 

I knew this wasn't going to be easy because I tried several times to scratch build this wagon. I gave up after messing up the rivets on multiple sides. I don't think there is any thing worse than a model with badly applied rivets. 

 

Graham, the numberplates are for Diagrams 1, 2, 14, 32,   There could be some more but I am afraid I don't keep good records being a bodger and with such a poor memory doesn't help things. 

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A good thick coating of spilled tar can hide a multitude of sins!

There are some neat 3D rivet transfers available that come in even rows and look the part. 

But I admire your attention to detail with the Masterclub rivets. 

Regards,

Mol

 

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With the decorating quietly been forgotten ( well by me anyway ) I have earned a few brownie points for helping out with odd jobs at my youngest daughters school where she is a teacher.  I earned some more this morning as well with a few jobs around the house. 

 

So while I'm in the good books for now, I went and soldered one side to the top plate for this latest tank wagon. I had riveted the side plates and decided they looked good enough to use. Unfortunately the riveting had stretched the plates so they overlap the ends by a few thou at both ends. I tried some of the Masterclub rivets in and they look fine to me. But the join of the plates is not going to be easy to disguise. I have come to the conclusion that I will unsoldered the plates and drill out all the embossed rivets and clean everything up before soldering back together again and using the Masterclub rivets for the whole tank. 

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Mike,

 

I am not sure what you mean by "disguising" the join...  given the period when this tank body was built I expect that the top / sides were held together by rivets through inside angle iron (or similar) hence a join between top and side was visible with an appearance just like that shown in the last photo of your most recent post.

 

regards, Graham

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Mike, what do you use for drilling all those holes - a drill obviously but what make and is it mounted in a Dremel, hand held pin chuck etc. Just drilling all the holes for the Masterclub bolts and rivets in plastic for my match wagon was bad enough but to do hundreds of them in metal.....

 

Dave

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