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Oh, I can categorically confirm that no sandpaper was used on DitD... Long splinter up the end of my fingernail this evening packing up. Strange, I thought John had found them all ;-p

 

It was meant for John...

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Sorry, I can't see the 'vans in that shot.

 

Hasn't anyone told Stubby about Damian wanting a Holiday Inn on that piece of prime real estate ? 

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Signal box looks great.

 

We know it's there Chris. ;)

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Won't be there much longer if you don't add a buffer stop to the end of that siding.

 

Does anyone make a good quality GW buffer stop?

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Does anyone make a good quality GW buffer stop?

 

Dave Franks.

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Does anyone make a good quality GW buffer stop?

These look pretty good to me, much as I remember the stop blocks at Chippenham - EDIT: can't get the link to work - but it's Lanarkshire Models, kit BS13

 

Rob just beat me to it, with the same answer!

Edited by HillsideDepot
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We are getting way off topic with diversion into Mouse droppings and urine, and I have no desire to start a fight, but Andrew P' s post :- 

 

Causes me to ask how does he know that "good quality nickel" would not be attacked by the rodent droppings. Who supplies the best and poor quality stuff. ?

Nickel Silver is a Bronze alloy, it is Copper based with about 12% nickel and 17 % zinc.

I have no information about Nickel Silver's Corrosion resistance, but I have asked a producer for their views. If I get an answer I'll report back, 

Again,I'm not trying to ruffle feathers!!

 

I asked one of the larger producers of Non-ferrous alloys in the USA for their views.... Their answer:-

 

Dear Donald,

 

I’m going to keep this rather short and sweet ….

Unfortunately I’m not sure which grade /alloy of Ni Ag was used on your friends model railway tracks, and I would venture to suggest that it was a grade with low Ni and therefore suffered pit corrosion from the urine and poop !

I would believe that if the track was made with C75200 or a similar grade of material, it probably would withstand this type of issue/attack!

I guess that this type of situation is rather infrequent, so the producers of same don’t take this into consideration when supplying same?

Lead is added into Ni Ag to give it better machinability.

 

I hope that this helps.

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Norman M. Lazarus

Senior Vice President

 

NBM METALS 

 

 

 

So, Andrew P was right to suggest there could be "Good and Bad " grades , The US company lists 5 grades, two with nominally 11% Nickel , one with 16% nickel, the latter having the better corrosion resistance. Two other grades contain lead, to impart good machining properties. similar grades would be available in Europe. 

I don't know which grade the Rail producers use, I suspect that they use the lower nickel grades for cost reasons.  It is unlikely that the corrosive effects of mouse droppings enter into their decisions of which grade to supply to the model rail world.   Nickel is expensive and relatively scarce, historically mined in Canada and Russia.

 

The mention of whether I should have called it a Brass or a Bronze.............The USA company above lists Nickel Silver in their Bronze range of materials.

 

If the corrosion on the rails on Treneglos have been pitted it is likely that significant amounts of the rail will have to be polished away,  the corrosion on the rail sides and underneath surfaces will be near impossible to clear in-situ.. Without having seen the layout and the damage, it does seem, to me, likely that the rails will need replacing, 

 

Previous posts on this subject are between post 8866 and post 8905 

Edited by DonB

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I asked one of the larger producers of Non-ferrous alloys in the USA for their views.... Their answer:-

 

Dear Donald,

 

I’m going to keep this rather short and sweet ….

Unfortunately I’m not sure which grade /alloy of Ni Ag was used on your friends model railway tracks, and I would venture to suggest that it was a grade with low Ni and therefore suffered pit corrosion from the urine and poop !

I would believe that if the track was made with C75200 or a similar grade of material, it probably would withstand this type of issue/attack!

I guess that this type of situation is rather infrequent, so the producers of same don’t take this into consideration when supplying same?

Lead is added into Ni Ag to give it better machinability.

 

I hope that this helps.

 

Kind regards,

 

 

Norman M. Lazarus

Senior Vice President

 

NBM METALS 

 

 

 

So, Andrew P was right to suggest there could be "Good and Bad " grades , The US company lists 5 grades, two with nominally 11% Nickel , one with 16% nickel, the latter having the better corrosion resistance. Two other grades contain lead, to impart good machining properties. similar grades would be available in Europe. 

I don't know which grade the Rail producers use, I suspect that they use the lower nickel grades for cost reasons.  It is unlikely that the corrosive effects of mouse droppings enter into their decisions of which grade to supply to the model rail world.   Nickel is expensive and relatively scarce, historically mined in Canada and Russia.

 

The mention of whether I should have called it a Brass or a Bronze.............The USA company above lists Nickel Silver in their Bronze range of materials.

 

If the corrosion on the rails on Treneglos have been pitted it is likely that significant amounts of the rail will have to be polished away,  the corrosion on the rail sides and underneath surfaces will be near impossible to clear in-situ.. Without having seen the layout and the damage, it does seem, to me, likely that the rails will need replacing, 

 

Previous posts on this subject are between post 8866 and post 8905 

 

 

What does he know....  ?

 

Andy

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Oh eck.

 

I say oh eck because;

 

  1. I've just had a Chicken Tikka Ceylon with Saag
  2. The layouts due out in three weeks
  3. Both
  4. None of the above - forget I said anything.

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Oh eck.

 

I say oh eck because;

 

 

  • I've just had a Chicken Tikka Ceylon with Saag
  • The layouts due out in three weeks
  • Both
  • None of the above - forget I said anything.
And a few Kingfishers?

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I need to re-plug our little show we have planned in three weeks to be held on Saturday 8th July 2017 at Gnosall Memorial Village Hall, Lowfield Lane, Gnosall, Staffs ST20 0ET.

 

The layout line up is as follows;

 

- Tackeroo

- The Contract

- Black Country Blues

- Diesels in the Duchy

- The Mill

- Felton Lane (Goods)

- Fryers Lane

 

Opening times are 11:00 to 17:00 admission costs £5.

There is free parking and disabled access at the venue.

A half-hourly bus service provides connections to Stafford and Telford stations.

 

Link. http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/119176-staffordshire-finescale-group-modelling-showcase-8th-july-2017/?p=2587795

 

post-8734-0-24019600-1498036859.jpg

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Right, DitDs ready for the show tomorrow.

 

When I say ready I mean the layouts still in the trailer from the last show and I know where all the stock boxes are.

 

Yeh, I think that's ready.

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