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47 minutes ago, Nimbus said:

What characteristics lead you to your verdict of 'outstanding'?

 

The Nim.

Maybe not outstanding but pretty dam good, they are now tight on the tyres and axle and run true. I am happy with the spoke shape etc. taken a while to get them to what I think they should be and unless you are making your own then it does offer a way to get the wheels that are not available through other suppliers.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

Hi.

I have been having a bit of success using that eSun resin too.

 

image.png.eb8141f36b5afe57cfb7e21a3428a2ac.png

 

On the left are some 8mm diameter J94 wheels, on the right are some 6mm diameter class 04 wheels. All need steel rims fitting (once they arrive in the post).

 

Thank you David for highlighting its potential.

 

Missy.

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  • 3 months later...

Hello there,

This is my first post, I just signed up.  I live in the States and I should warn you, I am not a hardcore scale modeler.  I run what I think you call ‘deep flange’, we call it Hi-rail.   My quest is to find 80” drivers for a conversion of an original American Flyer Atlantic P-7.  I have been exploring using 60”, 0 scale drivers, but the problems I see are the hubs are too big and the center’s rim, too wide.  I’ve looked at Slater’s and an American firm, Stevenson Preservation Lines.  Stevenson uses Slater’s self-quartering, 3/16” axles.  Slater’s has, what they call, a 19mm back to back narrow gauge axle, which is mid-way between the NASG S Standards of 18.09mm, Hi-rail and 20.55mm for scale.

So, do you think I’m going about this wrong or might it just work?  I have no experience doing this kind of thing and this will be my first attempt.  I belong to several S forums here and have been discussing finding 80” drivers for a while.  Someone recommended your group to me.

Thank you,

Tom Stoltz

in Maine, USA

tr_rdg351.jpg.ab482e1008079eb94cf25681ef0b0e77.jpg

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You have a few choices.

 

A 4mm wheel will probably do the job with an extended axle.  According to my maths a 80" wheel in S Scale is 31.7mm diameter.  in 4mm scale 31.7mm is equivalent to 7'11".

 

So you need to finsd a 7'11" 4mm wheel ideally OO or EM with a decent tread and put it on a axle that will allow the right B2B.

 

Alan Gibson makes a 8' wheel.  This will be close enough, but he will not supply the axles or at least he did not last time I asked.  So you will need to get someone to cut 1/8 steel bar to the right length so that you can push the wheels on to give you the right back to back.

 

Alternatively if you get the wheels I could 3D print centres that would enable a Markit S Sclae axle to fit.  But that would come with a caution that these are big wheels and any plastic wheel of this size is going to be relatively weak....On the S Scale forum page there are some examples of my wheels - the most recent with a video clip is in the "what is on your bench" blog.

 

You then need to fit crank pins.  These should be chosen depending on existing crank pin diameter - I like Markits but I am sure others will do the job.

 

You also need to think about pickups....if the existing wheels are steel for pickup purposes you will need a wire to get from the tyre to the axle.  If the pickup is off the tyre then these may need to be adjusted with a new tyre - but this should not be too difficult.

 

The above is just a suggestion, it may not work as I have not seen your model but as with all things there is usually an answer.

 

Hope that helps. 

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  • 2 months later...

All this talk of tyres has me contemplating their use in cases where a wheel is not available - in my case a P2. So, first question; what is the recommended approach to removing the existing tyres? 
 

Thank you, in advance.

 

Best,

Marcus

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Depends on how they are made.

Alan Gibson Worksop wheels have a plastic centre which is pushed into a rim, so you push it out.

Mike Sherman used to put the tyres into the mould, with a U shaped grove, and then inject nylon into them. This style requires a lot more effort, and (obviously) is not suitable for replacement inserts.

So, the obvious answer is to find a wheel close if not the same as your prototype in diameter, and buy them from a manufacturer that uses a push-fit.


Remember, though, that returning and reprofiling prototype tyres meant they could be up to 3” smaller in diameter than the nominal “as delivered” size (thinner tyres in earlier years meant up to 1 ½” smaller) and also that when he owned the business, the eponymous proprietor of Alan Gibson Wheels produced his wheels to 1” less than the prototype maximum diameter, which helped with 00/EM flanges being deeper than scale. I assume the current owner does a similar thing, but cannot say.

 

Are you modelling a NER P2 (LNER J26), LNER P2 (aka “Male Chicken O’ The North”), or some other loco class, and to which scale? It would help to know this.

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3 hours ago, EHertsGER said:

All this talk of tyres has me contemplating their use in cases where a wheel is not available - in my case a P2. So, first question; what is the recommended approach to removing the existing tyres?

 

Current Hornby RTR steam wheels have their tyres moulded into the rims. Two careful cuts exactly 180 degrees apart has the tyres off and wheel centres  ready for turning to accept Gibson tyres. I would imagine Oxford rail wheels are similar, Heljan spoked wheels (Class 05 shunter) and Ultrascale are similar.

 

Picture worth a thousand words and all that.

 

 

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3 hours ago, Quarryscapes said:

Have any of you tried the eSun resin on a square ended axle fitment? 

 

I recently have - it's a great resin in terms if tensile strength, and it drills and taps for the crankpins really well. What I'm not sure about yet is the durability around the axel area after removing and installing the wheels multiple times. I have a feeling they might become a looser fit over time, but I only finished a set of 6 wheels for my Manning Wardle Old Class i build last week, so I guess time will tell. Mine were designed for Slaters axels. 

IMG_3932.jpg.2be9a72c30ce16634239889bd9be2ae7.jpg

Edited by jdb82
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It's a resin I don't get on with, I find it impossible to clean up properly. I can attest it's high tensile strength though, I have today hammered M8 Bolts into it in order to use it as a mounting mandrel to turn some bush sleeves for my Car in the lathe. It was easier to print a tube than to try and bore a long concentric hole in the lathe! 

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34 minutes ago, Quarryscapes said:

 I find it impossible to clean up properly. 

 

Agreed! I hate the stuff for cleaning. It doesn't seem to matter how many times I clean the tank/built plate/parts with 99.9% IPA, I always seem to get a blue tint to my cleaning cloth. It doesn't seem to affect any resins used after it on subsequent prints though. Other limitations I have found with it are it doesn't print fine detail very well (although that's not what it's designed for), and I've not found settings yet that allow for good dimensional accuracy - anything that needs precision needs a fair amount trial and error experimentation which can be a quite time consuming!

I reckon I'm about 1/3 of the way down the bottle, and the Yorkshireman in me won't buy anything different 'till I've run out of the eSun....

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12 hours ago, jdb82 said:

 

Agreed! I hate the stuff for cleaning. It doesn't seem to matter how many times I clean the tank/built plate/parts with 99.9% IPA, I always seem to get a blue tint to my cleaning cloth. It doesn't seem to affect any resins used after it on subsequent prints though. Other limitations I have found with it are it doesn't print fine detail very well (although that's not what it's designed for), and I've not found settings yet that allow for good dimensional accuracy - anything that needs precision needs a fair amount trial and error experimentation which can be a quite time consuming!

I reckon I'm about 1/3 of the way down the bottle, and the Yorkshireman in me won't buy anything different 'till I've run out of the eSun....

 

Glad it's not just me then! The wheels above have all come out very well I'd say. I wonder if it might be worth trying ethanol as a cleaning solution? 

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5 hours ago, Quarryscapes said:

 

Glad it's not just me then! The wheels above have all come out very well I'd say. I wonder if it might be worth trying ethanol as a cleaning solution? 

 Agreed all the wheels look good. It’s fine for that level of detail. Good shout on the ethanol. Hadn’t thought of that.

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  • 1 month later...

Nice work!

 

I tried using the black eSun tough and it does seem to work well. I find if they are printed directly on the base plate, there is more chance of warping over a week or so. So I keep them on a raft with supports.

 

Need wheel rims, but they run fairly true:

 

Edited by Wayne Kinney
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