Jump to content

Sign in to follow this  
844fan

GS&WR K3 AKA Class 315 Moguls

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I recently discovered a loco I had long been interested in was a model of the K3 class Moguls fitted up for experiments that gave way to the Turf Burner. From the little infomation I've gathered on that engine it had a ignoble fate and after it's mods was used as a stationary boiler for the rest of it's days.

 

But I wish to know more about it's class mates. I know she ran on broad gauge 5 foot 3 if I'm not mistaken and I have plans for making a theoretical Standard gauge version of the experimental one only it would receive a better working life. But first befor any of that can happen I need help finding out more info for the real deals.

 

So if anyone by chance can help me out I'd appreciate it very much. Every dat I see locomotives of all shapes and sizes from every corner of the world and each one is just as interesting as the last.

 

Thank you for your time and take care. I do hope I posted this in the correct area too I'd rather not end up with a repeat of my last mistake.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can get hold of Ernie Shepherd's book "Bulleid and the Turf Burner" you will get more information there. 

I have not read it but a review states, 'the whole book appears to be on the Turf Burner and the K3 prototype'.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....that engine it had a ignoble fate and after it's mods was used as a stationary boiler for the rest of its days.....

 

Coey K3 no.356 was scrapped by CIE in about 1957, the year in which the Turf Burner CC1 began its trials.

 

I'm not aware of 356's boiler having then ended up in stationary use; Inchicore still had quite a few boilers which may have seen such use, although what went on there in respect of withdrawals and scrapping at the time is not well-recorded in photographs, apart from the series of photos taken by J.P O'Dea; steam haulage on CIE did not end until 1963.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can get hold of Ernie Shepherd's book "Bulleid and the Turf Burner" you will get more information there. 

I have not read it but a review states, 'the whole book appears to be on the Turf Burner and the K3 prototype'.

Welp looks like I got another book to buy from Abebooks. Heh excellent though I can't get a copy for some time. Price is reasonable but I am saving my money for the dreaded Steam Summer sale. I got gifts for my friends to buy and I also have one in mind for myself. Hmm I may just have to make my engine as a look alike and base it off another Mogul. Well for the CVR anyway I'll make a proper K3 scaled for standard gauge for my garden railway. Thank you for the advice on a good book.

 

Coey K3 no.356 was scrapped by CIE in about 1957, the year in which the Turf Burner CC1 began its trials.

 

I'm not aware of 356's boiler having then ended up in stationary use; Inchicore still had quite a few boilers which may have seen such use, although what went on there in respect of withdrawals and scrapping at the time is not well-recorded in photographs, apart from the series of photos taken by J.P O'Dea; steam haulage on CIE did not end until 1963.

As far as I heard 356 was converted as a stationary test bed. She never was stripped down to be a stationary engine ther just kept adding things to her seeing how well the pressure held and such. Now don't hold me to that I think it was on Mike Morrant's gallery for Ireland. The photo's caption said she never moved again. I hope that isn't true no engine should end up as part of a building's heating system. Running on rails or sittin on a short plinth with rails in a nice roof over them is the only way if you ask me. But I love locomotives much as the Rev. W Awdry did. "Steam locomotives are as close to creating true life." and unlike the fiction of man creating new life Steam engines were symbiotic with those who built them.

 

Treat a machine with care and love and you will always be rewarded. Especially if it happens to be a locomotive. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

I have the Ernie Shepherd book and can give you some information that may help;-

 

Class K3 0-6-0 no 356, supplied by North British Loco Company, modified to 2-6-0 due to problems on the bends. Bullied and his team modified it as the test bed for turf burning, it ran on the tracks all the way to Cork and back, it went through many changes during testing and was eventually sidelined as CC1 came on line.

 

Shepherd's book has a chapter on 356 with many fascinating photographs of her in the workshop and out under test. If thinking of modelling this loco, this book is a must. One stunning photo is of the modified loco, its tender, and a wagon trailing behind with a Layland bus engine on it, used to provide assistance in the drafting- now there's a model?

 

Prior to 356 being set up, Bullied and the team ran tests on burning milled turf in the lab and in the Icnhicore Power House boilers and 356 was the follow up to that.

 

I plan a Gauge O model of this loco, I find it more interesting than CC1.

 

Eoin

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

 

I have the Ernie Shepherd book and can give you some information that may help;-

 

Class K3 0-6-0 no 356, supplied by North British Loco Company, modified to 2-6-0 due to problems on the bends. Bullied and his team modified it as the test bed for turf burning, it ran on the tracks all the way to Cork and back, it went through many changes during testing and was eventually sidelined as CC1 came on line.

 

Shepherd's book has a chapter on 356 with many fascinating photographs of her in the workshop and out under test. If thinking of modelling this loco, this book is a must. One stunning photo is of the modified loco, its tender, and a wagon trailing behind with a Layland bus engine on it, used to provide assistance in the drafting- now there's a model?

 

Prior to 356 being set up, Bullied and the team ran tests on burning milled turf in the lab and in the Icnhicore Power House boilers and 356 was the follow up to that.

 

I plan a Gauge O model of this loco, I find it more interesting than CC1.

 

Eoin

The book doesn't by chance list any measurements like wheel diameter, Overall length (Buffer to buffer would be best but you know take what you get.) or anything like that? 

 

By the time CC1 came to be 356 was by far the more interesting engine in just looks alone I mean when I first saw it I thoug it was a attempt to give a engine the benefits of both a tender and pannier tanks. A real long distance runner as far as water would be concerned (Granted that wasn't what I was seeing but it sounds and looks interesting) Fact is CC1 is a redesign of the Leader and it to me looks more interesting than CC1 does. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi 844fan

 

No, but here it is from the Clements & McMahon book 'Locomotives of the GSR'

 

Cylinders = 19"x26"

Radial Wheels = 3' 0"

Driving Wheels = 5' 1&3/4"

Original Wheelbase = 5' 0" + 8' 0" + 9' 0" When rebuilt with Bissel truck = 6' 6" + 8' 0" + 9' 0"

Loco Length = 31' 3&3/4"

 

Bullied based the design of the burning system from an Italian firm Franco-Crosti according to documents found in Inchicore- Franco-Crosti were threatening to sue CIE in relation to the patent for this design?

 

Eoin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi 844fan

 

No, but here it is from the Clements & McMahon book 'Locomotives of the GSR'

 

Cylinders = 19"x26"

Radial Wheels = 3' 0"

Driving Wheels = 5' 1&3/4"

Original Wheelbase = 5' 0" + 8' 0" + 9' 0" When rebuilt with Bissel truck = 6' 6" + 8' 0" + 9' 0"

Loco Length = 31' 3&3/4"

 

Bullied based the design of the burning system from an Italian firm Franco-Crosti according to documents found in Inchicore- Franco-Crosti were threatening to sue CIE in relation to the patent for this design?

 

Eoin

Thank you so much that will be a big help my friend. I only have one last question is the last measurement from buffer to buffer or just from beam to beam? Thank you again for the help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi 844fan

 

I reckon it's buffer to buffer, the book doesn't say, but I have used the book for other locos that I have drawings for and it comes out pretty close, give an inch or two- if it was beam to beam the calculations would be out by 4' or so!

 

I do know Mr Clements and I will enquire

 

Eoin

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

.....As far as I heard 356 was converted as a stationary test bed. She never was stripped down to be a stationary engine they just kept adding things to her seeing how well the pressure held and such. Now don't hold me to that I think it was on Mike Morrant's gallery for Ireland. The photo's caption said she never moved again. ....

 

I think this is the photo you are referring to - the stovepipe chimney is a late addition, used for lighting-up.

 

The caption merely says that 356 never saw main line service, which in the context of 356 means as a revenue-earning locomotive. This photo shows what she might have looked like before the conversion took place

 

If you are able to obtain a copy of Ernie Shepherd's book, I think you will find quite a bit of information therein which shows that, in her experimental form, she did undertake a number of test journeys on the main line, occasionally with amusing side-effects.

 

That reminds me: if you are going to build 356 in her experimental form, you may want to portray the tender lettering with the "Experi" obscured by grime and dirt, so that the sides read "C.I.E. .....mental Turf Burning Locomotive".  :jester: 

Edited by Horsetan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi 844fan

 

Mr Clements has returned with confirmation- the loco dimension is from front face of front buffer to rear face of frame, he also states- These dimensions can be considered “official” but should not necessarily be taken as accurate!

 

I'd say if you work on 31' 3" no one will ever know!

 

Eoin

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think this is the photo you are referring to - the stovepipe chimney is a late addition, used for lighting-up.

 

The caption merely says that 356 never saw main line service, which in the context of 356 means as a revenue-earning locomotive. This photo shows what she might have looked like before the conversion took place

 

If you are able to obtain a copy of Ernie Shepherd's book, I think you will find quite a bit of information therein which shows that, in her experimental form, she did undertake a number of test journeys on the main line, occasionally with amusing side-effects.

 

That reminds me: if you are going to build 356 in her experimental form, you may want to portray the tender lettering with the "Experi" obscured by grime and dirt, so that the sides read "C.I.E. .....mental Turf Burning Locomotive".  :jester: 

Indeed that is the photo my friend. Looks a sad sight no mater if it did run again or not. It's quite clear she was not treated well thanks to the test bed nature she was in. Heh I am modeling a CIE K3 but as a Standard Gauge interpretation and it is heavily inspired by 356 but it's not going to be full on accurate and all. Heh heh one variation of said model that is 3D computer rendered is based off how I first inturpreted the first photo of her I ever saw which is where her Franco-Crosti boilers looked quite a lot like Pannier Tanks.

:mosking:

Hi 844fan

 

Mr Clements has returned with confirmation- the loco dimension is from front face of front buffer to rear face of frame, he also states- These dimensions can be considered “official” but should not necessarily be taken as accurate!

 

I'd say if you work on 31' 3" no one will ever know!

 

Eoin

Awesome news my friend. Since I'm modeling a Standard Gauge interpretation of the loco I'm sure No one will mind either way :derisive: Please thank Mr. Clements for the help for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's of interest for a model, it appears that the thing spent its short life in "works grey" (more like light wagon grey rather than the dark grey used on locomotives). Lettering was black.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.