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Pete Goss

Copper Wort

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Peter

Great buildings what type of glues do you use, card to card and plasticard to card

 

Ray

 

Ray

Plasticard to card, and card to card I tend to use Evostick or Unibond contact adhesive (Sparingly and even ).   Spread a little on the card side and spread with a finger to even out , then quickly press the plastic on and take it off again and spread the residue on the back of the plastic thinly and evenly with the finger again and leave for a couple of seconds to dry before firmly pressing together.  You will still have 2 or 3 seconds after all that to adjust the alignment.  I am aware it melts the plastic if applied too thickly but in all the years using this process I have never really had any issues; apart from once on the Etton layout where the warehouse roof tiles did distort slightly in one area. That was the only time.

 

Creating wall panels as flat pieces may mean they begin to curl due to differential material expansion chemistry stuff, but once straightened again between fingers when dry and additional card reinforcement applied egg crate fashion, as is my method, they are fine and very strong.

 

cheers. Pete

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Oh Pete, those chimneys are magnificent!

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Thank you for your comments. Very kind. I am enjoying working my way through it all. I believe it is important to get the colouring right on large buildings as everything else then reads off it. I re-painted one or two items that weren't going right - trying to put too much into it I think. 

 

The boards are currently in Judge Dreads workshop so I can't show anything in context at the moment.

 

After the windows are done, there comes 70 plus working scratch built gas lamps, mostly wall mounted on gallows brackets which I have had made by Julie at York Model Making. I am also hoping to create some mechanically operated figure movement this time albeit limited to 4 or 5  situations.

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Amazing! The brickwork looks great, what method did you use to paint that?

Steve.

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Thank you for your comments. Very kind. I am enjoying working my way through it all. I believe it is important to get the colouring right on large buildings as everything else then reads off it. I re-painted one or two items that weren't going right - trying to put too much into it I think. 

 

The boards are currently in Judge Dreads workshop so I can't show anything in context at the moment.

 

After the windows are done, there comes 70 plus working scratch built gas lamps, mostly wall mounted on gallows brackets which I have had made by Julie at York Model Making. I am also hoping to create some mechanically operated figure movement this time albeit limited to 4 or 5  situations.

Your baseboards are now as ready as I can make them Peter, they are ready for any alterations you may require.  My assistant (Tappa) and I are ready also to give you a rundown on the use of the z21 system.  Well he is.

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Amazing! The brickwork looks great, what method did you use to paint that?

Steve.

 

I have always followed the procedures outlined in Martyn Welch's book The Art of Weathering as a start point. Washes and dry brush techniques over the embossed plasticard before picking individual bricks out. This does require practice and a will to do it in the first place I guess.

PG

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Hi Peter

It’s great to see your work on here, looking forward to seeing it develope , very nice work as per usual Peter.

Pete L

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I have always followed the procedures outlined in Martyn Welch's book The Art of Weathering as a start point. Washes and dry brush techniques over the embossed plasticard before picking individual bricks out. This does require practice and a will to do it in the first place I guess.

PG

I've read and re-read that book but I have never been able to master brickwork, I'll have to keep practicing :-)

Steve.

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. . . along with working gas light construction.

.

I thought you were stepping it up yet another level for a second there! ;)

 

 

Thanks for the tips on lighting, the buildings are wonderful.

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Interior lighting is next on the list for a couple of buildings along with working gas light construction. Interior rooms are constructed first for only the illuminated areas obviously.  After a lot of experimentation with grain of wheat bulbs and LED's and resisters, I am using 3 volt 3mm LED clear, amber light LED's. 1000 ohm resisters for the gas lights and 39 ohm resisters for the interior lights. A blob of black acrylic paint on the end of the bulb takes away the point of light. Gas lights are constructed form clear plastic using template to score out the pieces from a sheet of clear plastic. The one in the picture is a mock up only as the actual ones will have ornate bracketry and finials. The power is taken from a 12 volt to 3 volt step down DC transformer [ attachicon.gifDSCN3738a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3757a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3759a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3761a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3762a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3763a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3765a.jpgattachment=1104550:DSCN3737a.jpg]

 

 

 

Looks good, in fact, very good to me.

I trust the other electrics are working well.

Keep up the good work.

Regards, John.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

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I thought you were stepping it up yet another level for a second there! ;)

 

 

Thanks for the tips on lighting, the buildings are wonderful.

 

I couldn't get the gas to stay in the plastic tube long enough to connect it all up - so decided to use electric instead!

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Interior lighting is next on the list for a couple of buildings along with working gas light construction. Interior rooms are constructed first for only the illuminated areas obviously.  After a lot of experimentation with grain of wheat bulbs and LED's and resisters, I am using 3 volt 3mm LED clear, amber light LED's. 1000 ohm resisters for the gas lights and 39 ohm resisters for the interior lights. A blob of black acrylic paint on the end of the bulb takes away the point of light. Gas lights are constructed form clear plastic using template to score out the pieces from a sheet of clear plastic. The one in the picture is a mock up only as the actual ones will have ornate bracketry and finials. The power is taken from a 12 volt to 3 volt step down DC transformer [ attachicon.gifDSCN3738a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3757a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3759a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3761a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3762a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3763a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3765a.jpgattachment=1104550:DSCN3737a.jpg]

 

 

 

Looks good, in fact, very good to me.

I trust the other electrics are working well.

Keep up the good work.

Regards, John.

 

 

 

 

John,  I have had one or two of the boards up individually but not the whole layout yet as need to clear the workshop out at one end a bit! 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

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Interior lighting is next on the list for a couple of buildings along with working gas light construction. Interior rooms are constructed first for only the illuminated areas obviously.  After a lot of experimentation with grain of wheat bulbs and LED's and resisters, I am using 3 volt 3mm LED clear, amber light LED's. 1000 ohm resisters for the gas lights and 39 ohm resisters for the interior lights. A blob of black acrylic paint on the end of the bulb takes away the point of light. Gas lights are constructed form clear plastic using template to score out the pieces from a sheet of clear plastic. The one in the picture is a mock up only as the actual ones will have ornate bracketry and finials. The power is taken from a 12 volt to 3 volt step down DC transformer [ attachicon.gifDSCN3738a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3757a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3759a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3761a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3762a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3763a.jpgattachicon.gifDSCN3765a.jpgattachment=1104550:DSCN3737a.jpg]

 

 

 

Looks good, in fact, very good to me.

I trust the other electrics are working well.

Keep up the good work.

Regards, John.

 

 

 

 

John,  I have had one or two of the boards up individually but not the whole layout yet as need to clear the workshop out at one end a bit! 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

Just whistle and I'll come a running. 

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Just whistle and I'll come a running. 

 

Actually could do with a whistle.....  a small steam loco whistle sound operated by a push button 12v DC?? Any ideas? 

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Actually could do with a whistle.....  a small steam loco whistle sound operated by a push button 12v DC?? Any ideas? 

Leave that one with me but if anyone reading this can help, please do.

Ta ever so. John. 

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Another winner!

 

I liked the way World's End looked but always found the operational side a bit lacking for those like me who like to see a bit of shunting.

 

You have over compensated!

 

Looking at how much model making has happened in a short time, I was wondering if you work really fast or if you have just put a huge amount of hours in.

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Another winner!

 

I liked the way World's End looked but always found the operational side a bit lacking for those like me who like to see a bit of shunting.

 

You have over compensated!

 

Looking at how much model making has happened in a short time, I was wondering if you work really fast or if you have just put a huge amount of hours in.

 

The Worlds End was designed on purpose to be scenic with trains running straight through, with the odd 158 unit turnback over the viaduct crossing for variety. 

 

This one is obviously more intimate and even though it will involve shunting of course I was hoping to promise the very short trains a trip around the layout once on their way to the next siding to be shunted. That way I don't have to concentrate as much and won't rush through the running order too fast and can hopefully still keep things moving whilst chatting.  

 

Time wise I guess I do spend a lot of time modelling. Try not to watch telly you see!  I keep lists of things to do and things to get so I'm not waiting too long to get the next bit done.

 

cheers, Pete

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The Worlds End was designed on purpose to be scenic with trains running straight through, with the odd 158 unit turnback over the viaduct crossing for variety. 

 

This one is obviously more intimate and even though it will involve shunting of course I was hoping to promise the very short trains a trip around the layout once on their way to the next siding to be shunted. That way I don't have to concentrate as much and won't rush through the running order too fast and can hopefully still keep things moving whilst chatting.  

 

Time wise I guess I do spend a lot of time modelling. Try not to watch telly you see!  I keep lists of things to do and things to get so I'm not waiting too long to get the next bit done.

 

cheers, Pete

Sounds like a very sensible approach to operating at a show. Full time shunting is mentally hard work so a slow trundle round should work nicely. People on one side won't know that the train hasn't shunted on the far side anyway.

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Just found this thread. What superb modelling of buildings and all that goes with them. So very well done, the end product will be something to see.

Derek

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I have just found this too. Lovely buildings and urban details. Inspiring modelling, thank you for sharing.

Jamie

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We took the layout to the East Anglian Model Railway show at Kettering last month. Jackie had insisted I took it in 'whatever state it was as people like to see how things are put together; and it also shows it doesn't just all come out of a box!'.  So here we were all set up ready. It was a really good weekend.

 

Once back home I carried out the planned major change of moving the High Street board from its current location at one end of the brewery to between the malting's and brewery boards. This now reflects more accurately the image of Burton town centre with brewery buildings all round and level crossings on every street.  (Board 3 on the diagram.)

DSCN3861a.jpg

DSCN3857a.jpg

Plan Gg June 2019.pdf

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