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Pete Goss

Copper Wort

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Posted (edited)

Nice photo of the layout all set up. How are you planning to do the groundwork, what have you put inbetween the rails?  Will they be check rails?

Steve.

 

Edited by sb67

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I've just found this. Looks fabulous. 

 

 

Rob

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1 hour ago, sb67 said:

Nice photo of the layout all set up. How are you planning to do the groundwork, what have you put inbetween the rails?  Will they be check rails?

Steve.

 

The 'check rails' are actually 1.5mm square plastic strip notched to represent a row of edge setts following a couple of contemporary photos I am using. No rails. The set area between is then to be masked off before filling with fine filler then scored with a ruler before scoring again by hand.  

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Posted (edited)

Lovely to see such detailed urban buildings, the painting on the brickwork is exceptional.
 

Seeing the tracks and how you are working the cobbles around it, is fascinating.
 

Truly inspirational work.

Thank you for sharing it with everyone.

Jamie

Edited by Jamiel
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Hi Pete,

What an absolute delight to read through this thread. Love the 'feel' you have incorporated into everything, especially the buildings of course which are exceptional.

Your patience is clearly rewarded by being able to produce such beautiful work. It all looks effortless and natural which is a real skill in itself.

Hats off to you sir!

Richard

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Those setts look fantastic Pete, I like the idea of the scribed plastic strip, looks very good. Also the colour works well too, great stuff.

Steve.

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On 07/07/2017 at 12:08, Judge Dread said:

That method of entry onto the first floor was replaced by a proper lift but the show itself has slipped into history.

There was a very small lift which we used and it's to the right of the staircase we used to pack up. 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_07_2017/post-276-0-64840100-1499425752.jpg

Blankenberg is well worth a visit in it's own right and one should get a taxi from the P&O terminal in Zeebrugge if you use the ferry from Hull. It's only a mile or so. If you really want to go to Bruges, then a rail ticket is also very reasonable from Blankenberg.

As to strong beer, we could only manage two bottles each of this.

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_07_2017/post-276-0-51969600-1499425687.jpg

No, 3

 

steve :D

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I am in utter awe of this work, Pete, it is just incredible. This combination of urban and industrial floats my boat completely!

 

I don't think I managed to note what filler you are using for your setts (which look excellent, by the way).

 

I have a much, much smaller area on my current project and have used tile grout, scribed with a steel pin, in a pin vice. Also painted with a wash of enamels, in this case (of all things) Precision Weathered Wood!

 

20190628_161439.jpg.e6e3dbd3552378d3df5adbf62d268f77.jpg

 

20190628_161539.jpg.4292769599c8879509a34c70b2d62074.jpg

 

 

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Very nice Captain K. Good isn't it?.....weathered wood I mean, it's very good for washes on all sorts of things. The humbrol version is quite good although it's not quite so weathered. Life colour do a very good acrylic set that's worth it's weight in gold too. 

Regards Lez.Z.  

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What fantastic modelling, though to be expected having seen your previous layouts. Sadly I've not seen them for real but I live in hope.

 

Another follower

 

Martyn

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I'm ashamed to say that I've only just found this thread  - and what a glorious layout! The buildings are just sumptuous,  and the whole thing is full of interest, making you want to peer into every nook and cranny. 

This is one that I shall drive miles to see!

 

Wonderful!

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On ‎17‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 20:10, Captain Kernow said:

I am in utter awe of this work, Pete, it is just incredible. This combination of urban and industrial floats my boat completely!

 

I don't think I managed to note what filler you are using for your setts (which look excellent, by the way).

 

I have a much, much smaller area on my current project and have used tile grout, scribed with a steel pin, in a pin vice. Also painted with a wash of enamels, in this case (of all things) Precision Weathered Wood!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/20190628_161439.jpg.e6e3dbd3552378d3df5adbf62d268f77.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/20190628_161539.jpg.4292769599c8879509a34c70b2d62074.jpg

 

 

Captain K.  Your setts have come out great. They look really good.

 

After some consternation I decided to use BnQ household filler with a tad of pva. Scribing is done with a small engineers screwdriver, head maginifier's and reading glasses. Previous comments on this thread have suggested other materials including tile filler as you have done and DAS. I agree that enamels would be best  for painting.

 

 As the water based filler absorbs quickly I am looking to paint the setts before carefully washing in the gaps, and this week I am  experimenting with the order of things at the moment. I have made up a few sample squares to practice techniques before committing fully. 3 options are being considered. 1. airbrush thinly with light stone colour, then wash the joints, 2. dry brush over the top of the setts leaving joints bare, then wash the joints, or 3 paint the surface before scribing (this method would be to maintain clarity of joint).

 

Just washing bare filler and wiping results can result in a bit if a mush particularly using water based paints on filler. The clarity is lost. I will post the results soon.  Maybe the tile filler would have been better as it is water proof and would have taken paints better.

Pete

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On ‎17‎/‎08‎/‎2019 at 21:28, mullie said:

What fantastic modelling, though to be expected having seen your previous layouts. Sadly I've not seen them for real but I live in hope.

 

Another follower

 

Martyn

Martyn

 

Funnily enough, they are still about. 'Rowlands Castle' can be seen at Stanstead House in Rowlands Castle, Hampshire during summer months I believe, and is going to the Netherlands next year as part of a Dutch celebration of the Allied help given to them during the war. 'The Worlds End' is out next January in Knaresborough, North Yorkshire as part of a charity weekend. And Copper Wort is going to Pickering, Portsmouth and Spalding next year, but the High Street scene probably won't be complete but I am hoping the brewery will be complete.

 

Cheers

Pete  

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Chaps,

 

Many thanks for all your very kind comments. It is great that people are prepared to follow these old ramblings and discuss some of the topics and elements. I have certainly learnt a lot from peoples comments, both what to do and what not to do of course.  I don't believe you can completely create these things without such interaction.

Cheers

Pete 

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Posted (edited)
On 17/08/2019 at 20:10, Captain Kernow said:

I am in utter awe of this work, Pete, it is just incredible. This combination of urban and industrial floats my boat completely!

 

I don't think I managed to note what filler you are using for your setts (which look excellent, by the way).

 

I have a much, much smaller area on my current project and have used tile grout, scribed with a steel pin, in a pin vice. Also painted with a wash of enamels, in this case (of all things) Precision Weathered Wood!

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/20190628_161439.jpg.e6e3dbd3552378d3df5adbf62d268f77.jpg

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_08/20190628_161539.jpg.4292769599c8879509a34c70b2d62074.jpg

 

 

I have to say Precision Weathered Wood is my favourite colour at the moment!! Sad, I know, but it is proving such an all-round useful colour. Not only for (heavily) weathered wood but all-round grimy washes, tarmac, roofing felt etc etc.

Edited by Tricky
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AY mod.  many thanks for the 'our picks' slot that I have only just spotted!  I am hopeless at seeing the obvious quite often.  PG

 

 

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2 hours ago, Pete Goss said:

AY mod.  many thanks for the 'our picks' slot that I have only just spotted!  I am hopeless at seeing the obvious quite often.  PG

 

Thanks to 'our picks' you've gained at least one extra (very interested) follower.

Your model making is always super and with this project I've gained insights into how-to-do setts and rails properly - which I'd have been glad of a few months ago when embarking on my own little section.

The strips of scribed styrene as a kind of edging/shuttering for the filler is brilliant! Whether it is your original idea or not, it's great and much appreciated.

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1 hour ago, chuffinghell said:

Those buildings are fantastic!

That's a plus +1 from me - droolworthy model-making, the brickwork alone is amazing!

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Only just found this thread (still can't get used to the new format).

 

Great stuff Pete - More inspiration!

 

Mike

 

 

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Pete,

 

Fantastic work as usual.

I've spotted something puzzling with the old picture of Burton High Street. The door and balcony on the Signalbox has no staircase?  No idea how trains were controlled on the brewery network, but I wonder if the balcony was for handing instructions or a Token/Staff to the driver?

 

Looking forward to more updates

 

Paul

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Another absolute work of art from the master of building construction!
I follow the progress. It gets better and better. The choice of role models is very good.

 

Best greetings, Torsten

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On ‎04‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 10:24, Flying Fox 34F said:

Pete,

 

Fantastic work as usual.

I've spotted something puzzling with the old picture of Burton High Street. The door and balcony on the Signalbox has no staircase?  No idea how trains were controlled on the brewery network, but I wonder if the balcony was for handing instructions or a Token/Staff to the driver?

 

Looking forward to more updates

 

Paul

Paul

I am assuming the staircase is at the back of the box (parallel to the track).  That is what I am modelling. The signal box appears to only control the crossing gates and local signal. The brewery points in my case will be operated by 2 ground frames mounted on small timber decks. Photo's soon. This may be over the top as most contemporary pictures I have show points mostly hand lever operated at ground level next to the point, but as horses and foot traffic were at ground level as much as at platform level, I have (conveniently) covered all the point rodding in timbers. 

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