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Pete Goss

Copper Wort

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On ‎03‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 14:27, scoobyra said:

Only just found this thread (still can't get used to the new format).

 

Great stuff Pete - More inspiration!

 

Mike

 

 

Mike

 

We are due to bring the layout to Portsmouth next year coincidentally as a 'work in progress'.

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On ‎05‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 09:12, blackmoor_vale said:

Another absolute work of art from the master of building construction!
I follow the progress. It gets better and better. The choice of role models is very good.

 

Best greetings, Torsten

Guten tag Torsten.  Hope you are well.  I will be contacting Herr Ebe again very soon once the brewery and maltings boards are completed.  Auf Wiedersehn.

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On 09/10/2019 at 12:49, Pete Goss said:

Mike

 

We are due to bring the layout to Portsmouth next year coincidentally as a 'work in progress'.

 

Excellent! World's End is still one of my greatest inspirations.

 

I'll look forward to seeing you.

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On 20/02/2018 at 19:44, Pete Goss said:

The brick soldiers themselves are then made from plasticard strips (say 3mm wide for 9" brick soldiers for example), the strip should be longer than required so it can be trimmed to fit the opening.  Partly cut through on one side only with the Stanley knife. The strip will start to curve naturally in one direction.  Trim to suit.  Job done. 

 

 

 

Hi Pete ...

I missed this comment on first read - but has neatly answered all the questions I had about your brick course / headers technique.

Thanks so much for taking the time to photograph your step-by-step guide.

I had it in mind that your headers were 3rd-printed or laser cut etc but this 'analogue' method is perfect.

I've taken to scratch-building fairly recently and find your solutions increasingly appealing (lining-pen windows, hand cut arches etc.)

Your techniques make it easier to adapt to the various sizes, styles and proportions that a building dictates.

Mind you - your method still demands a great degree of design, cutting and measuring skill!

 

Edited by brylonscamel
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On ‎07‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 10:44, brylonscamel said:

 

Hi Pete ...

I missed this comment on first read - but has neatly answered all the questions I had about your brick course / headers technique.

Thanks so much for taking the time to photograph your step-by-step guide.

I had it in mind that your headers were 3rd-printed or laser cut etc but this 'analogue' method is perfect.

I've taken to scratch-building fairly recently and find your solutions increasingly appealing (lining-pen windows, hand cut arches etc.)

Your techniques make it easier to adapt to the various sizes, styles and proportions that a building dictates.

Mind you - your method still demands a great degree of design, cutting and measuring skill!

 

Yes, an interesting comment on the skill or mind set required to measure and cut things out. I would say that, as with all these things, taking time out to set up the physical making process to start with will help considerably and pay dividends in time. Such as perhaps using a small drawing board as I do, or maybe a nice piece of plain wood with 2 steel rulers screwed down at right angles with one of them raised a little for card to pass under for measuring and marking, you will be in a much stronger position to draw and mark out en-masse, rather than just one thing at a time. A much more economical use of time I have found. This is why I always try and construct, build and finish several buildings at the same time, so all walls can be made at the same time, painted, all windows etc.  It maybe takes longer overall but all are finished at the same time.

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1 hour ago, Pete Goss said:

Yes, an interesting comment on the skill or mind set required to measure and cut things out. I would say that, as with all these things, taking time out to set up the physical making process to start with will help considerably and pay dividends in time. Such as perhaps using a small drawing board as I do, or maybe a nice piece of plain wood with 2 steel rulers screwed down at right angles with one of them raised a little for card to pass under for measuring and marking, you will be in a much stronger position to draw and mark out en-masse, rather than just one thing at a time. A much more economical use of time I have found. This is why I always try and construct, build and finish several buildings at the same time, so all walls can be made at the same time, painted, all windows etc.  It maybe takes longer overall but all are finished at the same time.

 

Pete - Thanks again giving a detailed response! I had spotted your use a traditional drawing board. I had a big A0 drawing board many years ago but it went in various house moves!

.. But I like the your DIY solution : steel rulers and wood 

I've got a small collection of brick buildings on the workbench at the moment and appreciate what you say about building and painting simultaneously.

I got into a right pickle recently with mis-matched colours on a collection of whisky distillery buildings. It all came out OK in the end but I regret doing the painting in batches!

 

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I like the shoe polish idea........ one thing tho....... will any dust or debris stick to it?

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That's very neat work scribing the setts but (and I'm afraid it's too late now) the appearance is improved if the voids between the sleepers are filled in first. It's particularly apparent around the points because  of the extra space required for the blades to move.

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Not if it's been buffed up it won't. Look on it as shiney armour plating. Anyone who's bulled up a pair of DMS army boots will tell you that dust just blows or wipes off the surface.

Regards Lez. 

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Some of the railway workers having a brew in the mess room.  The room has since been illuminated before closing it up with the roof.

DSCN4110a.jpg

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Some more illumination.  This time gas lamp standards, 14 in total. Negative wire runs inside the brass tube, the positive wire is soldered top and bottom so the brass standard carries the current.  A 1000 ohm resister will be fitted to each standard once the lamps are planted.  Other than that the electrics are the same as the wall mounted ones shown earlier.

DSCN4188a.jpg.e9d77aebdcbd940d1d365c4ebd7a1bbb.jpgDSCN4191a.jpg.0150773b71c009c4328dd3161c3f9e96.jpgDSCN4193a.jpg.b350ce9dbdb82203a2374a742fe1dfe7.jpg

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  • Craftsmanship/clever 5

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