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Modelling mojo and state of mind


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All this talk of Tai Chi makes me think I should grab a Chinese after walking the dog later.  Yes, it's a black one, but she helps me manage her namesake.

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A careless fast driver hit my my drivers side mirror this morning on the way to work, I was in the right bit of road and they weren't. I'm a bit shocked by the impact and even more by the repair cost of 380 punts, the car being booked in for its MOT on Thursday and not passable without a mirror.

 

The point is that nasty shocks and events don't help the modelling mojo, when I have quite a lot to do before the Mountsorrel show this weekend, not to mention work as well. Only consolation as ever being 'could have been worse'!

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6 hours ago, Dava said:

A careless fast driver hit my my drivers side mirror this morning on the way to work, I was in the right bit of road and they weren't. I'm a bit shocked by the impact and even more by the repair cost of 380 punts, the car being booked in for its MOT on Thursday and not passable without a mirror.

 

The point is that nasty shocks and events don't help the modelling mojo, when I have quite a lot to do before the Mountsorrel show this weekend, not to mention work as well. Only consolation as ever being 'could have been worse'!

 

I understand the time limit this time (MOT), but next time try 247spares.co.uk

I've had a lot of success with various items, at sensible prices. Mostly s/hand

but sometimes new parts.

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15 hours ago, Dava said:

A careless fast driver hit my my drivers side mirror this morning on the way to work, I was in the right bit of road and they weren't. I'm a bit shocked by the impact and even more by the repair cost of 380 punts, the car being booked in for its MOT on Thursday and not passable without a mirror.

 

The point is that nasty shocks and events don't help the modelling mojo, when I have quite a lot to do before the Mountsorrel show this weekend, not to mention work as well. Only consolation as ever being 'could have been worse'!

 

Dava,

 

I am really sorry to hear id your incident. When things happen like that they can have a big impact on our self-confidence and mood, sometimes disproportionately so, but it is how we deal with it that is critical. It was obviously a big shock, particularly with it in no way being your fault, and I understand it can be a setback. 

 

It could have been a lot worse though and you're safe and well which is the most important thing. I know it is much easier said than done, but try not to dwell on the incident and look forward. Hopefully the upcoming show can act as a focus and something positive to concentrate on. 

 

Take care,

David 

 

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I'd consider fitting a camera just for that sort of stuff, they are quite inexpensive and easy to fit these days. Sadly, even if you report it and claim on the perpetrators insurance it can still put your premiums up. Insurance is a bloody racket.

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On 09/04/2019 at 12:32, Coldgunner said:

Hello darkness my old friend. Taken a knockback with my Roundhouse live steam kit lately and its hit my mojo a little. All assembled, timings set up and part of the bodywork done, only to find steam leaks at the cylinder heads requiring a replacement gasket. I wouldn't normally be so bothered but its been a to get right.

 

How are things and more importantly how are you doing today?

 

Chris

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On 03/03/2019 at 07:23, NHY 581 said:

Morning David. 

 

Try small projects. Build things up gradually. Try not to 'over plan' things. Start, finish move on. A bit at a time.  .........

Starting and finishing a small shelf layout was the best thing that I have done with regards to my take on this hobby. 

 

Rob. 

 

On 03/03/2019 at 09:17, south_tyne said:

Thanks Rob. 

 

It is definitely something I want to do. ........

 

David

I dropped into this thread, probably for different reasons than others.

 

I'm just looking for some way to stop thinking and start doing. I've got two blank baseboards, modern stock & locos, and that's it. I'd love to have a nice large roundy-round layout with lots of interest. I want to lay track, weather my stock, build buildings realistically, make realistic scenery etc (I like your stuff NHY581). But I haven't even laid any track.

 

I've no doubt that I have the skills, or can develop the skills, I've always loved making things, but so far I've made nothing for model railways in 30 years.

 

I'm still working, children still at school / college age, so time is precious. I hate having to re-do something, or fix mistakes, it's such a waste of time, time I have little of.

 

For this reason I want my first layout to be my only layout and therefore perfect.

 

And that's probably why I'm over thinking everything: planning, design, ideas and more ideas.

 

And then I saw your posts above. Rob, your suggestions is just what I needed. Instead of going big on my first layout I should have something small on a plank instead. But now I'm thinking, unlike steam where I could have a pannier and two or three wagons and introduce a point for a siding or loop, modern locos are long, rolling stock is long, so the plank/shelf would have to be really long in order to have some interest, otherwise it'll be just a length of single track going over-and-back.

 

I'll need to think this through a bit more, but certainly I like the idea of a plank/shelf to get me started.

 

Thank you both.

Edited by Damo666
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1 hour ago, chuffinghell said:

 

How are things and more importantly how are you doing today?

 

Chris

 

Bit better, got the replacement gasket set for the loco and did a rebuild of the cylinder arrangement last night. Applied PTFE tape to all the gas and steam joint so should hopefully steam tonight and start running in.

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7 hours ago, Damo666 said:

 

I dropped into this thread, probably for different reasons than others.

 

I'm just looking for some way to stop thinking and start doing. I've got two blank baseboards, modern stock & locos, and that's it. I'd love to have a nice large roundy-round layout with lots of interest. I want to lay track, weather my stock, build buildings realistically, make realistic scenery etc (I like your stuff NHY581). But I haven't even laid any track.

 

I've no doubt that I have the skills, or can develop the skills, I've always loved making things, but so far I'm made nothing for model railways in 30 years.

 

I'm still working, children still at school / college age, so time is precious. I hate having to re-do something, or fix mistakes, it's such a waste of time, time I have little of.

 

For this reason I want my first layout to be my only layout and therefore perfect.

 

And that's probably why I'm over thinking everything: planning, design, ideas and more ideas.

 

And then I saw your posts above. Rob, your suggestions is just what I need. Instead of going big on my first layout I should have something small on a plank instead. But now I'm thinking, unlike steam where I could have a pannier and two or three wagons and introduce a point for a siding or loop, modern locos are long, rolling stock is long, so the plank/shelf would have to be really long in order to have some interest, otherwise it'll be just a length of single track going over-and-back.

 

I'll need to think this through a bit more, but certainly I like the idea of a plank/shelf to get me started.

 

Thank you both.

A possible answer to the loco length problem for modern image is to go industrial, which can include a few internal user older wagons.  But I endorse the idea of a plank to get you going; it'll build your confidence, teach you a lot, and be a lot of fun.  And it could be incorporated as a branch or siding off your eventual bigger layout, so nothing is wasted, and you have something to use as a test running track in the meantime.  Win win.

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1 hour ago, The Johnster said:

A possible answer to the loco length problem for modern image is to go industrial, which can include a few internal user older wagons.  But I endorse the idea of a plank to get you going; it'll build your confidence, teach you a lot, and be a lot of fun.  And it could be incorporated as a branch or siding off your eventual bigger layout, so nothing is wasted, and you have something to use as a test running track in the meantime.  Win win.

Thanks Johnster, Brilliant way of looking at it. Recycling.

 

Apart from the experience to be gained, as you say, there would be:

A Branch, Siding or spur that can be used for the eventual layout

or

a Programming track come running-in track.

 

So it's part of the overall scheme and not a waste.

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17 hours ago, Damo666 said:

 

I dropped into this thread, probably for different reasons than others.

 

I'm just looking for some way to stop thinking and start doing. I've got two blank baseboards, modern stock & locos, and that's it. I'd love to have a nice large roundy-round layout with lots of interest. I want to lay track, weather my stock, build buildings realistically, make realistic scenery etc (I like your stuff NHY581). But I haven't even laid any track.

 

I've no doubt that I have the skills, or can develop the skills, I've always loved making things, but so far I'm made nothing for model railways in 30 years.

 

I'm still working, children still at school / college age, so time is precious. I hate having to re-do something, or fix mistakes, it's such a waste of time, time I have little of.

 

For this reason I want my first layout to be my only layout and therefore perfect.

 

And that's probably why I'm over thinking everything: planning, design, ideas and more ideas.

 

And then I saw your posts above. Rob, your suggestions is just what I need. Instead of going big on my first layout I should have something small on a plank instead. But now I'm thinking, unlike steam where I could have a pannier and two or three wagons and introduce a point for a siding or loop, modern locos are long, rolling stock is long, so the plank/shelf would have to be really long in order to have some interest, otherwise it'll be just a length of single track going over-and-back.

 

I'll need to think this through a bit more, but certainly I like the idea of a plank/shelf to get me started.

 

Thank you both.

 

Hi Damo, 

 

I am really pleased that the discussion here has proved helpful to you. Rob's advice really is great - better to try something small and manageable to get going and test your skills. Smaller, micro layouts offer the opportunity to try a range of skills and tasks through a project that doesn't need to last a lifetime, doesn't have to be expensive or take up a great deal of space. Rob's use of the Ikea shelves is a fantastic way of utilising an instant baseboard to get going quickly. Another advantage of these type of projects is that, if the worst happens and it doesn't work out, you haven't lost very much at all, in terms of time and funds. You can then recycle 90% of the materials and start again!

 

Ultimately the hobby is about giving things a go - nobody is perfect or gets everything right first time. We only learn by attempting things and making mistakes! All I can do is encourage you to give a little layout project a go...... you've nothing at all to lose!

 

7 hours ago, Damo666 said:

Thanks Johnster, Brilliant way of looking at it. Recycling.

 

Apart from the experience to be gained, as you say, there would be:

A Branch, Siding or spur that can be used for the eventual layout

or

a Programming track come running-in track.

 

So it's part of the overall scheme and not a waste.

 

More sound advice there. A minimum space plank offers the best solution in my view. I am biased, but small, industrial locos are a great idea too! A small project can also offer potential for extension and expansion in due course. That's one of the beauties of using some such as the Ikea shelving units (other brands are available!!) where the standard size of the units means that multiple units could be developed in due course as time, funds and skills allow. They are also so easily stored! 

 

Anyway, I'll stop rambling but hope the chat here is of some encouragement. It certainly has been for me. 

 

Cheers,

David 

 

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On 12/04/2019 at 09:32, Damo666 said:

 

I dropped into this thread, probably for different reasons than others.

 

I'm just looking for some way to stop thinking and start doing. I've got two blank baseboards, modern stock & locos, and that's it. I'd love to have a nice large roundy-round layout with lots of interest. I want to lay track, weather my stock, build buildings realistically, make realistic scenery etc (I like your stuff NHY581). But I haven't even laid any track.

 

I've no doubt that I have the skills, or can develop the skills, I've always loved making things, but so far I'm made nothing for model railways in 30 years.

 

I'm still working, children still at school / college age, so time is precious. I hate having to re-do something, or fix mistakes, it's such a waste of time, time I have little of.

 

For this reason I want my first layout to be my only layout and therefore perfect.

 

And that's probably why I'm over thinking everything: planning, design, ideas and more ideas.

 

And then I saw your posts above. Rob, your suggestions is just what I need. Instead of going big on my first layout I should have something small on a plank instead. But now I'm thinking, unlike steam where I could have a pannier and two or three wagons and introduce a point for a siding or loop, modern locos are long, rolling stock is long, so the plank/shelf would have to be really long in order to have some interest, otherwise it'll be just a length of single track going over-and-back.

 

I'll need to think this through a bit more, but certainly I like the idea of a plank/shelf to get me started.

 

Thank you both.

Don't start with a plank, splinters, pop down to Ikea and get yourself a shelf.

 

This chap here got me back into OO, including said Ikea purchase(s) , simple plans, amazing models.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, Coldgunner said:

I've wondered about building a layout on a plank and calling it plankton. My mind wanders occasionally...

I actually had a layout on a plank called Plankton back in the 80s; I claim no ownership of the name or idea, though.  It had a single track crane shunt fold around fiddle yard/headshunt called, for similar reasons, Battenborough Jc.  It was a kind of progenitor of Cwmdimbath in that the 'baseboard' came out of a skip.

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Evening all. 

 

Thanks for the mentions. By way of encouragement............

 

To save delving into the murky and sometimes somewhat disturbing world of the Sheep Chronicles, I have extracted the following images. 

 

This is Sheep Lane in its infancy back in early 2016. 

 

Main board is 110cm x 26cm. Fiddle yard is 80x26cm. Both are LACK shelves. 

 

Total cost back then was £18. 

 

Rob. post-14122-0-96435600-1453047395_thumb.jpg.d3fcf0ca9bdfdcfc7da82d48e3359412.jpgpost-14122-0-66365100-1452889754_thumb.jpg.fa51570122f91cf38057759d75596286.jpg

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Sometimes just getting through the week seems like an achievement ....

 

Wind back to last week, April 9. Car door drivers side mirror smashed . Car booked in for MOT anyway. Fails as it also has broken n/s spring I didn't know about. I suspect potholes. Garage has obtained  passenger side wing mirror so car has to stay with dealer an extra day. I get to use the bus more and the total bill is $600+. Not pleased!

 

Saturday: Mountsorrel Show. . Busy day, very good show, lots of interest on GCR stand, admired 'Saltdean' & other layouts. Chap on Coastal DCC stand told me what I needed to do to finalise the sound activation on a loco I'd never have worked out on my own. 

 

Sunday: Birthday, not quite 'old git' yet. Fixed loco [Ixion  Hudswell. Clark] which now emits noises from its own little speaker and has been reassembled after 9 months. Lunch at pleasant local pub with Mrs Dava. Shared bottle of Chapel Down. Good weekend.

 

Monday-Tuesday: Back at work, lots of crap and annoyance but feeling a a lot more resilient than a week ago. Have to go to Coventry tomorrow but on leave after that, even with lots to do. Weekend weather looks nice.

 

Planning to set up 'Coxheath Sidings' for a 3 loco DCC running gala.  Modeling is definitely helping as therapy, so is marriage I think.  Otherwise the world out there gets more crazy every day.  

 

Dava

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Evening all, I pop in on this thread every now and then. I heartily echo Rob’s post above - have a go. When I look back at what I have achieved over the past 2 years or so I can’t quite believe it. I’m not sure I’ve ever had depression or ‘black dog’, but I’ve documented my experiences of a nervous breakdown elsewhere and on here. I’ve also said elsewhere that the therapy of having some modelling to focus the mind was and is extremely important. What I really want to say here is I have kept a journal every single day now for almost two years. It started out as a means of listing all the good things that happened over the course of the day/week/month etc but has developed into a record of daily life - not a novel each day, sometimes just a few lines. But when I read back over it sometimes it is staggering to recall just how much I have done and how easy it is to forget. So when I think I haven’t done a lot, I look back and see that my present perspective is sometimes a bit warped. Our minds love playing tricks and it’s a full time job keeping mine in check! So chin up, have a go and keep a record so you can look back and be proud of yourself. 

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1 hour ago, Tricky said:

Evening all, I pop in on this thread every now and then. I heartily echo Rob’s post above - have a go. When I look back at what I have achieved over the past 2 years or so I can’t quite believe it. I’m not sure I’ve ever had depression or ‘black dog’, but I’ve documented my experiences of a nervous breakdown elsewhere and on here. I’ve also said elsewhere that the therapy of having some modelling to focus the mind was and is extremely important. What I really want to say here is I have kept a journal every single day now for almost two years. It started out as a means of listing all the good things that happened over the course of the day/week/month etc but has developed into a record of daily life - not a novel each day, sometimes just a few lines. But when I read back over it sometimes it is staggering to recall just how much I have done and how easy it is to forget. So when I think I haven’t done a lot, I look back and see that my present perspective is sometimes a bit warped. Our minds love playing tricks and it’s a full time job keeping mine in check! So chin up, have a go and keep a record so you can look back and be proud of yourself. 

 

You've a lot of admirers on here, it's not about how much you do, it's the artistry of what you do that matters and provides a bit of inspiration to the rest of us.

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I have been reading this thread on and off for a while now and can certainly relate to the feelings and thoughts of fellow rmwebbers and modellers about having projects that have seemingly ground to a halt in my case due a series of events and life things.

 

Having not had a layout of my own since my late teens I started to plan what would become my Speedlow layout back in 2010 via the traditional wallpaper backing paper and photocopied Peco point plans route and slowly developed the layout I had in mind for some time based on the Buxton/Peak District area in the 1989-1991 period. Wind the clock forward to now and the layout is still only at ballasted track stage with some partially completed kit-bashed quarry buildings, lots of rolling stock that needs finishing, converting etc. The layout is DCC operated and was shown at two local shows at the end of 2015 but not been out since and remains wrapped up in store. And still no further forward as I cannot put the layout up at home at present as not the room nor at my partners house to which she has very kindly given me some space upstairs in the back bedroom and the old kitchen table to permit me to slowly work on the quarry buildings. So at times the black dog does nip at my heels and I really do wonder what to do whether to just pack it all away and get rid of or persist and somehow try and finish the layout off? Even the thought of taking stock down to my local club to work on a Monday night does not have the same appeal anymore (nor does club membership sometimes). Ironic that the Buxton depot sector logo is a millstone grit wheel feels like I have one round my neck at times.

 

The idea of having a small layout somewhere I can run my wagons, locos and shunters to potter about rather than them sat in boxes and drawers does sound appealing... If you want to read more about Speedlow then I have a set of blogs but be warned apart from a minor update I am well behind with describing the progress of the layout as above.

 

Paul

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3 minutes ago, Coldgunner said:

Adding to Dava's post, part of the trick is to find things to look forward to. Should be at the Bluebell this weekend, hoping for good weather as its 'daaan saaath'

 

Definitely. Giving ourselves little treats is so important for our mental well-being. It doesn't have to be anything grand, expensive or ostentatious, just an afternoon out, a pint of beer, something nice to eat. It is really important, as there is a tendency for those suffering to punish ourselves, but breaking that cycle is crucial for recovery. 

 

I hope you have a great time at the Bluebell Railway - the weather looks cracking, particularly in the south, so fingers crossed you will be in luck! 

 

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