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NHY 581

Bleat Wharf. Breakfasts and Backwaters. The continuing adventures of Norman Lockhart.

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Bleat Wharf is the latest entry into the Cameo Competition, following on from my intial entry of 'Mutton'.

 

 

Bleat Wharf

 

{ Ex-S&DJR Goods only branch }

 

British Railways 1955- 1962

 

 

 

Bleat Wharf is a small inland quay 'somewhere in Somerset' and is at the end of a spur off the Highbridge branch of the S&DJR, set in the 1950s.

 

 

Goods only, the area is run down and approaching closure. Traffic is mostly vans or covered carriage trucks serving the few remaining quayside businesses. Services run as required and haulage is provided by wheezy ex-Midland 3F tender locos with the occasional 4F or 1P 0.4.4T.

 

The origins of the name' Bleat Wharf' are not what you might expect. The name evolved from the original name for the area, 'Scheepswerf' which is Dutch for 'Ship yard or boatyard'.

In the early years of the 19th Century, Jan Van Der Plank, a Dutch shipwright set up a small boatyard in the area. The boatyard closed when Van der Plank returned to Holland following his retirement in 1840 but the name for the area was adopted by the locals.

 

With the arrival of the railways to the area in 1850, a short branch from Highbridge Whard was created to what later became known as Bleat Wharf, named after Ebenezer Bleat, a local business man and importer of manufactured goods. Other cargoes handled early on were minerals and agricultural items, including livestock.

 

 

Both world wars saw extensive use made of the wharf and few original buildings remain with successive alterations being made over the years. During the Second World War, a number of tin buildings were erected by the Royal Air Force who operated a couple of Air Sea Rescue launches from there to patrol the Bristol Channel.

 

Moving along to the period modelled, the main industry is ' C K Maddocks ', a small precision engineering firm who took over the buildings previously occupied by the RAF in 1944/45. The original buildings of Maddocks were bombed in January 1941 by a lone Junkers 88, later brought down over the Bristol channel by Pilot Officer Stein of 263 Squadron flying a Westland Whirlwind out of Exeter.

 

After the war, things settled down and a general air of peaceful neglect descended on the wharf.

 

Maddocks continued to be a well respected producer of quality engineering but freight traffic was light, running as required by the time of the period modelled.

 

 

Overall size of the layout is now confirmed and will be 7ft x 2ft.

Baseboards will be my now usual IKEA shelfage.

 

Track will be PECO Code 75.

 

Buildings will be a variety of Ready To Plant from Bachmann and Hornby.

 

Locos will, as mentioned above, be ready to run Midland types from Bachmann. Rolling stock will also be ready to run. All stock buildings etc will be weathered accordingly.

 

 

A photo or two from Sheep Lane taken by Norman Lockhart in August 1960, illustrates the atmosphere I am looking to recreate on Bleat Wharf

 

Rob.

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Edited by NHY 581
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Gets my vote mate

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Sheeps Wharf is the latest entry into the Cameo Competition, following on from my intial entry of 'Mutton'.

 

Sheeps Wharf is a small inland quay 'somewhere in Somerset' and is at the end of a spur off the Highbridge branch of the S&DJR, set in the 1950s.

 

 

Goods only, the area is run down and approaching closure. Traffic is mostly vans or covered carriage trucks serving the few remaining quayside businesses. Services run as required and haulage is provided by wheezy ex-Midland 3F tender locos with the occasional 4F or 1P 0.4.4T.

 

The origins of the name'Sheeps Wharf' are not what you might expect. The name evolved from the original name for the area, 'Scheepswerf' which is Dutch for 'Ship yard or boatyard'.

In the early years of the 19th Century, Jan Van Der Plank, a Dutch shipwright set up a small boatyard in the area. The boatyard closed when Van der Plank returned to Holland following his retirement in 1840 but the name for the area was adopted by the locals.

 

Main industry is 'Matthew & Son ', an agricultural engineering firm who took over buildings previously occupied by American troops in 1944/45. The original buildings of Matthew and Son were bombed in January 1941 by a lone Junkers 88, later brought down over the Bristol channel by Pilot Officer Stein of 263 Squadron flying a Westland Whirlwind out of Exeter.

 

Overall size is to be confirmed but I suspect it will be 7ft x 2ft ish. Baseboards will be my now usual IKEA shelfage. Track will be PECO Code 75.

 

Buildings will be RTP.

 

A photo or two from Sheep Lane taken by Norman Lockhart in August 1960, illustrates the atmosphere I am looking to recreate on Sheep Wharf

 

Rob.

I hope there will be somewhere for Norman to buy a cup of cold coffee and a piece of cake.

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I hope there will be somewhere for Norman to buy a cup of cold coffee and a piece of cake.

 

There will be but Norman won' t have to be up at eight.

 

The Eagle caff opened in 1943 to cater for the Anerican troops in the area. When they left, it remained open and continues to offer an Anglo American menu.

 

Norman is very fond of the Apple pie served there.

 

 

Rob

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There will be but Norman won' t have to be up at eight.

 

The Eagle caff opened in 1943 to cater for the Anerican troops in the area. When they left, it remained open and continues to offer an Anglo American menu.

 

Norman is very fond of the Apple pie served there.

 

 

Rob

Just like Mom's I suppose.

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Was it Jan Van Der Plank's cousin, Days van Hire, who ran the 19th Century equivalent of Uber in the 'somewhere in Somerset' area Rob?

 

Looking forward to this one, I'm sure it'll have the same atmosphere as Sheep Lane & will be another cracker! It's also an idea I've long wanted to try out, so Ialso look forward to much inspiration!

 

Keith

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Hi Keith,

 

Days van Hire ran a cartage company in Bristol, in the late 1800's and occasionally brought loads to the area. When he sold up , the firm passed to another Dutch chap, Dwight van Mann who was one of the first to use small lorries to deliver items.

 

 

But I digress....... once again .....!!!

 

 

Rob

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I will knock up a plan......when I have one......

 

For now, while work continues on Mutton, updates will be in the form of work done to stock and buildings in preparation.

 

This way, when I do start, things should progress quickly.

 

 

I am hoping to have Sheeps Wharf ready around December/January.....ish

 

 

For now, here are a few photos, including a corker by Mr H.J.Sutters, father of our own Phil Sutters. I hope these convey what I am trying to achieve.

 

I will now have to add a 2P into the loco roster. How I have over looked this lovely loco I don't know......and I have a couple tucked away.

 

 

Also includes one of Norman strolling around....

 

 

Rob

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Edited by nhy581
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I will knock up a plan......when I have one......

 

For now, while work continues on Mutton, updates will be in the form of work done to stock and buildings in preparation.

 

This way, when I do start, things should progress quickly.

 

 

I am hoping to have Sheeps Wharf ready around December/January.....ish

 

 

For now, here are a few photos, including a corker by Mr H.J.Sutters, father of our own Phil Sutters. I hope these convey what I am trying to achieve.

 

I will now have to add a 2P into the loco roster. How I have over looked this lovely loco I don't know......and I have a couple tucked away.

 

 

Also includes one of Norman strolling around....

 

 

Rob

You sure that's Norman? Looks more like Sir John Bitumen.

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Take two cameo layouts into the shower?

 

You are brave, Sir, but the very best of luck!

 

I do like the idea of Highbridge Docks.

 

And that was indeed the Poet Lorryet strolling around.

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Take two cameo layouts into the shower?

 

You are brave, Sir, but the very best of luck!

 

 

Lightweight...

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Take two cameo layouts into the shower?

 

You are brave, Sir, but the very best of luck!

 

I do like the idea of Highbridge Docks.

 

And that was indeed the Poet Lorryet strolling around.

 

 

Thanks, CK. Not sure it's a good idea but I really fancy doing this. A slightly bigger, wetter, more buildingy version of Sheep Lane.

 

 

Hopefully I can quietly bring all the elements together once Mutton is properly underway.

 

 

Also by doing/planning/ working on two projects it may keep things fresh.........

 

 

( I also have some slight revision in mind for Sheep Lane. Structural as opposed to modelling....

 

 

Rob.

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You sure that's Norman? Looks more like Sir John Bitumen.

 

I suppose you could say Tar?

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I suppose you could say Tar?

 

Jack Tar has the Frog and Bucket, a nearby public house.

 

 

Rob.

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Jack Tar has the Frog and Bucket, a nearby public house.

 

 

Rob.

 

Ah yes, I can remember seeing it now in the distance.

I knew him as Jolly Jack Tar, he puts on a lovely thick spread enjoyed with a glass of the black stuff........

Perhaps that is were Mr Bitumen is off to?

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Ah! You have clearly met him before, Kevin.

 

I'm reliably informed courtesy if Norman Lockhart, Jack is very adept at reciting various Gilbert and Sullivan monologues after a few measures....

 

 

See the below of the first building purchased for Sheeps Wharf. Very happy with it apart from the questionable use of hinges.....a spot of work needed there methinks.....Aside from that it's exactly what I am after.

 

Rob

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Edited by nhy581
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Interesting building Rob, what are its origins ?

 

I think you're right about those hinges, with a little bit of careful surgery it'll look better.

 

G

Edited by bgman

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I do like the idea of Highbridge Docks.

 

And that was indeed the Poet Lorryet strolling around.

So do I.

post-14351-0-23993400-1501850070_thumb.jpg

 

There are more photos and information about the Wharf and its industries at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/gallery/album/4186-the-highbridge-wharf-project/

 

Incidently Sir John Bitumen might have been wandering down the Wharf to examine the 'pitch reservoir' at the western end. It is amazing how many industries there were in and around the Wharf. If I had a space 10 metres by 3 metres I would model the lot - and still have to find an add on for a brickworks across New Town Road!

Edited by phil_sutters
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That looks fab, Phil.

 

I think my efforts will be best described as 'a flavour of' or 'a nod to'( !!!) Highbridge and no where as faithful as yours.

 

Julia and Radstock look tremendous, I must say. Thank you for post.

 

In the small space I have I am looking to impart some of the open run down feel of the area.

 

You are of course spot on regarding the industry in the area which was perhaps not that evident at first glance. If I can only hint at it and provide an impression I shall be happy.

 

 

Rob.

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That looks fab, Phil.

 

I think my efforts will be best described as 'a flavour of' or 'a nod to'( !!!) Highbridge and no where as faithful as yours.

 

Julia and Radstock look tremendous, I must say. Thank you for post.

 

In the small space I have I am looking to impart some of the open run down feel of the area.

 

You are of course spot on regarding the industry in the area which was perhaps not that evident at first glance. If I can only hint at it and provide an impression I shall be happy.

 

 

Rob.

I should have given credit to Chris Handley for his information packed book - The Maritime Activities of the S&D - lots of useful photos too, although most are in my model's era or before. That is where I found the line drawings of the coasters, which kick started the whole project, although I had for a long time had a hankering for modelling the wharf, as I lived close by in the 1960s.

I expect that you have spotted Dad's photos of the latter years of the S&D at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/gallery/album/4076-sdjr-somerset-central-burnham-to-evercreech-junction/

Edited by phil_sutters

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Yes, Phil, those images if your Dads are a lovely collection with some fine views of 3F and 4F in particular.

I do like the view of 44411 whilst running around at Burnham.

 

 

Chris Handleys book on the Maritime Activities is very good......and provoked some thought. His other volumes on Radstock are also excellent with many fine photos and drawings and are recommended.

 

 

If I can just hint at the atmosphere of the wharfs, I shall be happy indeed.

 

Rob.

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There are some lovely views there, Phil.

 

This is my favourite........need a pillbox.....

 

 

Photo courtesy of the Newman family..

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Thanks, CK. Not sure it's a good idea but I really fancy doing this. A slightly bigger, wetter, more buildingy version of Sheep Lane.

 

 

So you're definitely not going to model the Somerset Ship Canal and have the MV Arkwright mooring up directly alongside Sheep Lane to unload 20,000 gallons of Baby Bio?

Edited by Captain Kernow
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In the small space I have I am looking to impart some of the open run down feel of the area.

 

 

Although many of the buildings around the railway are pretty tired and weather-worn in the 1950s-60s, have you noticed how well the track has been maintained. In the Burnham excursion photos you don't see weeds on the track, despite that bit of the line having been little used for ten or more years.

You can see how the tail end of the line fared after closure in a small new album in my gallery. I particularly like the little gasworks building http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/gallery/image/82171-highbridge-station-gasworks-9-1969/. If I was prepared to start being elastic with the wharf's already busy layout, I would love to include it. I can't remember if Paul Townsend has included it in his finescale blue era Highbridge Station layout. **

 

**edit - he did, although the MR July 2016 article photo only shows the gasometer end. Although the finescale track and detailed scale buildings impressed me, I couldn't fathom out why he used blue clerestory coaches and upper quadrant signals.

Edited by phil_sutters

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