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Atso

Atso's occasional workbench

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1 hour ago, jwealleans said:

In the brick bunker on the corner of Hills Road?   That's where I was although it's a few years ago now. 

 

I bet a lot of the same staff are still there, though.   It's one of those places where you spend a whole career.   Warn him now.

 

It's all on one site in a fancy new building roughly on the site of the old fuel sidings.  It's called "Cambridge assessment" now.

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@52.1878142,0.1331236,447m/data=!3m1!1e3

I think he enjoys it and finds Cambridge ok to work in, his fiancee is a solicitor and works only a few hundred yards away.

 

 

Sorry Steve....I do wander off topic a bit sometimes...:rolleyes:

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LOL Steve!   Nice Enterprise model.   I started designing something similar back in 2013 for someone else.   The project ended before I got it finished, but I did make some nice progress :)

 

I should finish it one day and 3D print it!

 

Ross.

 

Saucer_13m.jpg.e2ec20cdc0f0e5d14375220743c52ef2.jpg

Nacelle_Port_16m.jpg

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On 18/05/2020 at 13:10, chris p bacon said:

Sorry Steve....I do wander off topic a bit sometimes...:rolleyes:

 

Not to worry Dave, I like it when threads wander a bit! However, you and Jonathan must stop trying to undercut me when I'm trying to sell dodgy certificates!

 

On 20/05/2020 at 07:14, RBTKraisee said:

LOL Steve!   Nice Enterprise model.   I started designing something similar back in 2013 for someone else.   The project ended before I got it finished, but I did make some nice progress :)

 

I should finish it one day and 3D print it!

 

Ross.

 

Saucer_13m.jpg.e2ec20cdc0f0e5d14375220743c52ef2.jpg

Nacelle_Port_16m.jpg

 

Ross, the Enterprise D CAD looks incredible! That is not an easy subject to render... Please do finish and print it!

 

 

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So a bit of time where not much has happened. However that's now changed with some more progress being made on no.s 3286 and 4436.

 

238595544_3286443624-5-20.jpg.dad8ce35ca928697532457d50060ee66.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Hi RBTKraisee

 

As a Star Trek fan myself aswell as real and model railways I would be interested to see the finished product.

 

Please do finish the ship

Edited by 313201
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On 26/05/2020 at 10:04, 313201 said:

Hi RBTKraisee

 

As a Start Trek fan myself aswell as real and model railways I would be interested to see the finished product.

 

Please do finish the ship

 

Okay, I'll add it back into my list of projects.   Don't expect to see any progress soon though, I have to finish up my Gresley Restaurant Triplet Set and King's Cross models first.   Also that Enterprise-D was going to be 8ft long, so I should probably re-scale it a little bit ;)   In N gauge it would be close to 4.5m long, even in TT it would be 1.6m.   1/10th of TT might be realistic :D

 

Ross.

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On 24/05/2020 at 04:32, Atso said:

So a bit of time where not much has happened. However that's now changed with some more progress being made on no.s 3286 and 4436.

 

238595544_3286443624-5-20.jpg.dad8ce35ca928697532457d50060ee66.jpg

 

Steve, what is your criteria for choosing to model the handrails and buffers with brass parts instead of trying to integrate them directly into the 3D print?

 

Ross.

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1 hour ago, RBTKraisee said:

 

Steve, what is your criteria for choosing to model the handrails and buffers with brass parts instead of trying to integrate them directly into the 3D print?

 

Ross.

 

Hi Ross,

 

My criteria is usually based on the durability of the component and whether it's integration into the print hinder painting and lining. I like to have separate handrails on my locomotives (rolling stock is another matter) and these are best done using brass handrail knobs and wire. To print them would require supports and I think that keeping the handrails intact would prove impossible for any length of time; the same thing with lamp irons. Buffers are another component where a brass turning is far superior to a print. You can get a thinner section to the buffer head in brass while still retaining far more strength than a thicker print. As the buffer beams of these locos need to be lined out, it makes things far easier for the bow pen (or decals) if the buffers are painted separately and added last. As an additional benefit, you can remove and replace the buffers should they ever get damaged - I speak from experience having ruined an early printed body that suffered damage to its printed buffers and changed my approach following this.

 

Hope this helps.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, RBTKraisee said:

 

Okay, I'll add it back into my list of projects.   Don't expect to see any progress soon though, I have to finish up my Gresley Restaurant Triplet Set and King's Cross models first.   Also that Enterprise-D was going to be 8ft long, so I should probably re-scale it a little bit ;)   In N gauge it would be close to 4.5m long, even in TT it would be 1.6m.   1/10th of TT might be realistic :D

 

Ross.

 

Are you sure about your sums here Ross? Depending on whether you use continental or British TT gauge the 'D' would be between 5.35m and 6.32m. I think that 1/1000 scale would be a good size with the 'D' coming out at 64.25cm in length and fitting in nicely with the Polar Lights' 1/1000 scale series of TOS and TOS movie ships.

 

Speaking of 1/1000 scale TOS ships, I've been playing around with suggesting panelling and relief on the smooth saucer of my Enterprise while trying not to overdo things.

 

20200527_174719-1.jpg.de10f646344bda49438fa7b681163cba.jpg

 

All airbrushing effects with the lines radiating out from the center being shaded using Tamiya German Grey before applying a light(ish) coat of Tamiya Royal Grey. The circles were done using paper masks and more Royal Grey with a couple of drops of German Grey being added to the mix. To my eye, this is much more pleasing than one solid colour, although I understand that others might disagree. This is my first attempt at this kind of effect and I'm reasonably happy with how it has turned out.

 

 

Edited by Atso
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G'Day Folks

 

If you 'UP' scaled Enterprise....................................You could 'Live' in it  ....:P:P

 

manna

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Posted (edited)

Happily skipping down this rabbit hole... :lol_mini:

 

Andrew Probert told me he designed Ent-D to be 2,108ft long (643m).    Divide that by 148 and I get 4.34m for N.   Damn, I did mean T, not TT.   Thought it was 1:400.   But in 1:450 (correct) it would be 1.43m.

 

PS - *LOVE* that paint effect.

 

manna, a few years back there was actually a plan to build a full scale 290m long ToS Enterprise on the Las Vegas Strip, as a casino.   It hasn't come together so far, but did attract quite a bit of attention at the time.

 

Ross.

Edited by RBTKraisee
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On 27/05/2020 at 13:40, Atso said:

 

Hi Ross,

 

My criteria is usually based on the durability of the component and whether it's integration into the print hinder painting and lining. I like to have separate handrails on my locomotives (rolling stock is another matter) and these are best done using brass handrail knobs and wire. To print them would require supports and I think that keeping the handrails intact would prove impossible for any length of time; the same thing with lamp irons. Buffers are another component where a brass turning is far superior to a print. You can get a thinner section to the buffer head in brass while still retaining far more strength than a thicker print. As the buffer beams of these locos need to be lined out, it makes things far easier for the bow pen (or decals) if the buffers are painted separately and added last. As an additional benefit, you can remove and replace the buffers should they ever get damaged - I speak from experience having ruined an early printed body that suffered damage to its printed buffers and changed my approach following this.

 

Hope this helps.

 

Thanks Steve, this is a very useful insight.   I'm learning a lot about 3D printing things in N, so tips like this are really going to help me improve things.   Coincidentally, I just received my first handrail knobs from N Brass too.   Shocked how small they are, not sure I have the skill to do them properly, but I'm going to give it a bash and see if I can get something to look half as good as yours!

 

Cheers,

 

Ross.

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6 hours ago, RBTKraisee said:

 

Thanks Steve, this is a very useful insight.   I'm learning a lot about 3D printing things in N, so tips like this are really going to help me improve things.   Coincidentally, I just received my first handrail knobs from N Brass too.   Shocked how small they are, not sure I have the skill to do them properly, but I'm going to give it a bash and see if I can get something to look half as good as yours!

 

Cheers,

 

Ross.

 

No problem Ross. I suppose that you'll be shocked to learn that N gauge handrail knobs are overscale! The 2mm Association offer etched handrail knobs but I've never gotten on with them.

 

A tip for handling the handrail knobs is to lay a piece of masking tape sticky side up and secure it with a couple more pieces. Then place the handrail knobs into the sticky surface and thread the wire into the hole, tilt slightly and push the handrail knob along and repeat. Then glue/solder the knobs onto the model and remove the wire once set. Then cut a piece of wire to length and thread back through the handrail knobs. 

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It seems that I've been a bit remiss with updating this thread - things have slowly been happening.

 

The C1s have progressed from basic painting to an advanced stage of lining out using bow pens and brush work.

 

3286_&_4436_1-6-20.jpg.5b50c593bb4635b533a51ab867413ab5.jpg

 

Some tidying up required on the mudhole door lining below.

 

20200604_160839-1.jpg.9032badf5686341352d7b2ba5e52fdc4.jpg

 

This was done using a brush moistened with white spirit (almost dry really) to remove the excess paint and smooth out what was left.

 

20200604_161950-1.jpg.c06dc346af4cf368c98c84e2cb745d57.jpg

 

Then the black lining was applied using a fine brush and cleaned up as above.

 

1590674296_328644365-6-20.jpg.1c10b54211506604449f804ccf096b01.jpg

 

This was then repeated for the other side bringing things to today's job of adding all the red lining to the locos and tender frames.

 

540026220_44367-6-20.jpg.2d41552f493768343ea4e90c246afd80.jpg

 

One down, three to go!

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, Atso said:

 

No problem Ross. I suppose that you'll be shocked to learn that N gauge handrail knobs are overscale! The 2mm Association offer etched handrail knobs but I've never gotten on with them.

 

A tip for handling the handrail knobs is to lay a piece of masking tape sticky side up and secure it with a couple more pieces. Then place the handrail knobs into the sticky surface and thread the wire into the hole, tilt slightly and push the handrail knob along and repeat. Then glue/solder the knobs onto the model and remove the wire once set. Then cut a piece of wire to length and thread back through the handrail knobs. 

 

Overscale?   Yikes.   :wacko:

 

Great idea with the tape.   I'll try that approach when I can muster the courage!

 

And I'm always so impressed with your paintwork.   Beautiful lining and details there.   Picked up some ruling pens recently and I'll be trying that soon too, but my eyes aren't sharp enough and my hands not steady enough to have a hope of getting your level of detail - but your models are an inspiration none-the-less.

 

Ross.

 

IMG_0107m.jpg.aaa5470e248d8e515ba1325220d1a6e3.jpg

Edited by RBTKraisee
Showing the handrail knobs!
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On 07/06/2020 at 08:20, RBTKraisee said:

 

Overscale?   Yikes.   :wacko:

 

Great idea with the tape.   I'll try that approach when I can muster the courage!

 

And I'm always so impressed with your paintwork.   Beautiful lining and details there.   Picked up some ruling pens recently and I'll be trying that soon too, but my eyes aren't sharp enough and my hands not steady enough to have a hope of getting your level of detail - but your models are an inspiration none-the-less.

 

Ross.

 

IMG_0107m.jpg.aaa5470e248d8e515ba1325220d1a6e3.jpg

 

Hi Ross, if it is any help, I suffer from nerve damage to my left hand (I'm left handed) from my days as a competitive figure skater and suffer from intermittent trembling as a result. I've gotten around this by always ensuring that my wrist is supported so that any trembles are reduced to an acceptable level. My eyesight isn't great either and I make good use of optical aids for lining, etc.

 

Bow/ruling pens are a very useful tool to have but they need to be correctly profiled and have some rules governing their successful use. Rather than try to explain here, I'll direct you to Mike Trice's excellent videos which cover the use (and profiling) of a bow pen.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn1tp9oWk2g_gRlbsWGpNxQ

 

I'd also highly recommend Ian Rathbone's book on painting and lining.

 

Just remember what I always tell myself: I might try and fail, but I'll learn far more for next time than if I'd failed to try. ;)

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It was my birthday last week and I was luck enough to receive a Dapol A4 (DCC Supplies returned item) in the guise of 'Sea Eagle'. I already have this loco in my collection of A4s so an identity change was in order.

 

Below is the loco body parts after being stripped down and having the identity removed.

 

20200608_155730-1.jpg.9b77879d00f202519a8a2196a13e4819.jpg

 

The result after some airbrushing and careful masking up.

 

2126282349_SilverLinkbasicpainting.jpg.2d59795d0eb160a735b21f881029b0b9.jpg

 

There are numerous inaccuracies in this representation of one of the first A4s in initial service condition (as outlined in Wright writes). Other than removing the tender beading, I'm content to leave these be and call this a quick and dirty repaint of a 'layout loco'. If I was designing my own version from scratch, I'd be more inclined to represent the detail differences. Each to their own. 

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Despite it being the loco with the most discrepancies to the basic Dapol offering, I've decided to give the A4 Silver Link's identity. All I can say is that the loco wouldn't have been accurate for any of the Silver A4s really so I can live with the inaccuracies.

 

Here are the body bits with Dapol's interpretation of Silver Fox behind it as a comparison.

 

147042272_SilverLink12-6-20.jpg.b147a4b53121fda4ed7a53f9fc9e78df.jpg

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I decided to start weathering the body bits for Silver Link today.

 

20200614_214648-1.jpg.f10e6e1fd8ab5709e0b92dcc02b4b8ce.jpg

 

20200614_214732-1.jpg.02f5286bf09714414f6a7c49057d518f.jpg

 

I followed a similar method to that described in Martyn Welch's 'The Art of Weathering'. I mixed a drop of Humbrol polished steel into some Railmatch roof dirty and thinned it quite a bit with white spirit. I then gave the model a dusting of this mix with my airbrush and allowed it to go touch dry. I then took an old brush that have become quite stubby and wetted it with white spirit and proceeded to take most of the weathering layer off the model. I then went back over with the brush being almost dry and created the streaking effects. The photos have been taken using a flash and I hope to take some more photos in natural sunlight tomorrow. I've not finished the weathering yet as there are some other techniques I want to try. Note that I have not matted down the loco, the gloss was knocked back by the weathering.

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Other than adding some vac pipes and a screw coupling, Silver Link is just about complete. Here's a couple of photos of the loco having worked hard non-stop from Newcastle and a reminder of what the loco looked like a few days back.

 

20200615_173749-1.jpg.ac5758d04d962ce33fca19a20c4b2d7a.jpg

 

20200615_173709-1.jpg.805a96fab64493e9c93e441607385c3d.jpg

 

20200608_155730-1.jpg.72598d4b8f563c8f415db146901523c2.jpg

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Somebody on another forum suggested that the top of the boiler should have heavier deposits of soot by the time the loco reached Hadley Wood. Out with some Humbrol Decalfix and 'soot' weathering powder and some stippling with an old brush produced this effect.

 

20200616_082758-1.jpg.9194b32293d79ffb58babe4a10e275eb.jpg

 

Finally another comparison with Dapol's 'Flying Fox' product. I think it really shows just how toy like a RTR locomotive looks when compared to a weathered loco.

 

20200616_091426-1.jpg.c02609ac6de61cf4247a8cd339600da6.jpg

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The soot looks really good, there’s always spot on top of the boiler.  How much have you weathere the wheels? They look really effective compared with the standard Dapol.  
 

It looks like a clean engine that’s been at work, and that’s really hard to do, well done!

 

Cheers

Simon

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Thanks Simon,

 

I'm please that people think that I've achieved the effect I was after; I had many moments when I thought I'd overdone things.

 

The wheels were initially painted with Precision Silver Grey to cover the red and then got a light dry brushing of the weathering mix (Railmatch Roof Dirty and Humbrol Polished Steel Metalcote - Gunmetal would be better but I couldn't find my tin at the time). Any significant buildups were removed and allowed to fully dry before using thinned out Humbrol Brown Wash on the wheels and removing the excess after a few minutes to get a slightly metallic/oily sheen.

 

Hope this helps.

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On 11/06/2020 at 05:39, Atso said:

 

Hi Ross, if it is any help, I suffer from nerve damage to my left hand (I'm left handed) from my days as a competitive figure skater and suffer from intermittent trembling as a result. I've gotten around this by always ensuring that my wrist is supported so that any trembles are reduced to an acceptable level. My eyesight isn't great either and I make good use of optical aids for lining, etc.

 

Bow/ruling pens are a very useful tool to have but they need to be correctly profiled and have some rules governing their successful use. Rather than try to explain here, I'll direct you to Mike Trice's excellent videos which cover the use (and profiling) of a bow pen.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCn1tp9oWk2g_gRlbsWGpNxQ

 

I'd also highly recommend Ian Rathbone's book on painting and lining.

 

Just remember what I always tell myself: I might try and fail, but I'll learn far more for next time than if I'd failed to try. ;)

 

Your work amazed me *before* you said that, its all the more impressive now.   It gives me hope! ;)

 

Mike's vids were actually the reason why I just got myself a set of ruling pens and have now started practising :)   I'm still a long way from being any good, but I do see a little improvement each time I try - and just as with the teaking technique that you and Mike have been pioneering, I'm gradually getting better at it.   I really appreciate both of you guys taking the time to share not just images of your work, but also your techniques!

 

Thanks for the recommendation of Ian's book, I'll definitely get a copy.

 

And this Silver Link above is just stunning!

 

Ross.

Edited by RBTKraisee
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Thanks Ross, just keep practicing and things will improve - not that your efforts aren't looking very good already!

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