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It is possible to make excellent replica corrugated iron in 2mm scale using Slaters' 20 thou diameter round plastic. However, I guess that that would be a bit expensive for a building as big as this.

 

Corrugated iron certainly wasn't the only material used to construct hop-pickers' huts, vertical timber boarding, brick and even concrete panels were also used - although roofing was most often c/i.

I have had similar thoughts and have wondered if I can make a dye from the 1/2 round stuff ideally it would be 15 thou but  I say I'm still considering the issue

 

thanks for your input

 

 

i see you can get 0.75mm brass strip which equates to roughly 5"

 

Nick

 

edit for researched info

Edited by nick_bastable

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I have had similar thoughts and have wondered if I can make a dye from the 1/2 round stuff ideally it would be 15 thou but  I say I'm still considering the issue

 

thanks for your input

 

 

i see you can get 0.75mm brass strip which equates to roughly 5"

 

Nick

 

edit for researched info

 

I have a similarly large building for my layout that was clad in corrugated tin. I have built a die from 20 thou round plastic rod as you describe by glueing strips on to a small piece of plasticard. I've only tried it on thin kitchen foil so far, pushing the foil in to the grooves with a finger nail. It produces a nice representation, but is very fragile. The die only needs to be small if producing small, say 8' by 4' scale sheets. I plan to try again with heavy duty kitchen foil when I get some and see if it is more robust while still following the grooves. 

 

Another possibility, which I haven't tried is to use an M3 threaded screw pressed with, or without rolling along the foil on the plastic rod die, rather than finger nails. M3 has a 0.5mm pitch, so good for 3" pitch tin. More experimentation!

 

Mim

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This 3D printed sheet I have made available on Shapeways is about 14cmx8cm

 

http://shpws.me/M91Q
 

The 3D model is made up from individual 'standard' 12 foot sheets. If you let me have dimensions, I could do a complete roof 3D model for you. It is not exactly cheap, but it is true to scale.

 

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All the coorogated iron on TM and the Colliery is done useing heavy tin foil and the serrations on the edge of a coffee pot lid. I've no idea if they are scale or not, never counted them but I'm happy with how they look. I do think we can get a bit too hung up on strict scale and end up not being able to see the wood for the trees.

I don't bother with individual sheets either, doing long strips which are much easier to handle. I suggest joints at the painting and weathering stage. I stick the strips to a plasticard carcas with strong double sided tape.

It's also very cheap!

 

 

post-1074-0-33673900-1516096783_thumb.png

 

Jerry

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Another possibility, which I haven't tried is to use an M3 threaded screw pressed with, or without rolling along the foil on the plastic rod die, rather than finger nails. M3 has a 0.5mm pitch, so good for 3" pitch tin. More experimentation!

 

Mim

 

the M3 thread is a interesting idea  :scratchhead: 

 

The 3D model is made up from individual 'standard' 12 foot sheets. If you let me have dimensions, I could do a complete roof 3D model for you. It is not exactly cheap, but it is true to scale.

 

Ian Morgan

 

 I was not aware you did this wonder when Shapeways next has a post free offer, although the understandable thickness would require a redesign

 

I do think we can get a bit too hung up on strict scale and end up not being able to see the wood for the trees.
I don't bother with individual sheets either, doing long strips which are much easier to handle

 

Jerry 

 

I think you may well be right the initial tests I made using a ratio sheet as a die and Mrs B's Dye/Embossing machine  looked quiet good if a trifle over-scale they had the advantage they embossed into card or card makers foils ( its a bit like a pie dish foil only flat and a bit thicker )  I think I will revisit this idea first and make a mock up

 

thanks everyone for your helpful assistance

 

Nick

 

 

Edited by nick_bastable

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All the coorogated iron on TM and the Colliery is done useing heavy tin foil and the serrations on the edge of a coffee pot lid. I've no idea if they are scale or not, never counted them but I'm happy with how they look. I do think we can get a bit too hung up on strict scale and end up not being able to see the wood for the trees.

I don't bother with individual sheets either, doing long strips which are much easier to handle. I suggest joints at the painting and weathering stage. I stick the strips to a plasticard carcas with strong double sided tape.

It's also very cheap!

 

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1547.PNG

 

Jerry

 

I've admired pictures of your corrugated iron buildings and am hoping mine isn't too poor in comparison. Can you remember which brand of coffee the lid came from by any chance?

 

Mim

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Nick,

 

If you fancy going the 'R-T-R' route there are a couple of examples available from the USA:

 

http://www.builders-in-scale.com/bis/parts-metal.html

 

Page down and you will find N scale (strictly 1:160) corrugated sheets in a number of sizes. I have some and it is very good but on any small projects such as huts it can be a nightmare to use as it is very delicate.

 

Another that I have used in the past is:

 

http://www.campbellscalemodels.com/product_p/0801.htm

 

A number of different size sheets are available. Some might be a bit sniffy about it being HO but it is robust and can be cut cleanly with a sharp knife. The larger scale means that it has good definition even after painting and weathering whereas with a truer to scale version can end up looking a bit flat. I used it quite a lot on Ley Hill and nobody commented that my corrugations looked overscale. Perhaps I was just lucky!

 

post-9616-0-28191700-1516105291_thumb.jpg

 

David

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My experience with trying to produce corrugated sheets via a screw thread has not been good. Probably my lack of skill but also that the sheet has to be run through at the helix angle of the thread and tends to distort.

 

Izzy

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i see you can get 0.75mm brass strip which equates to roughly 5"

 

 

 

 

 

All the corrugated iron that I have seen in photos of hop-pickers' huts was of 3" pitch. The sheets would have been 26" wide (with a  minimum 2" over lap between adjacent sheets) and usually of 'whole foot' lengths between 6' and 12' (with 6', 8' and 10' being the most common). One didn't cut the stuff more than was absolutely necessary - around windows and doors and at the side of pitched roofs for example - as far as possible dimensions were accommodated by overlapping.

 

5" pitch corrugated iron was more usually used in civil engineering (shuttering for poured concrete was one use), although off-cuts could be found in general usage.

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I recently made some corrugated sheeting for a small shed using two lids, one of which is on a bottle of Carrs 188 solder paint and the other on a jar which once held styrene solvent (I think it was 'Plastic Weld', but it now has a label 'Polyclens' stuck over it!).  These have ribbing at a pitch I estimate to be just over 0.71mm, a scale 4¼ inches or thereabouts.  The downside is that the lids only have a usable depth of 14mm.  I used ordinary kitchen foil and fixed the (individual - wouldn't do that again!) sheets to the (styrene) roof by putting them in place, tacking the edge with cyano and then flooding cyano down the underside of the ridges.  The idea behind this was that the set cyano would give some strength and rigidity to the foil.

 

I have a small stone barn-type building to make for Kirkallanmuir and I intend to try roofing it in the same way.

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thank you all 

 

 very helpful  I do like the look of the American products but the most interesting one by the time you add  postage takes it  into VAT and clearance charges potentially making a $5.65 item potentially cost nearly £40   :nono:   I may have to take a trip around a supermarket looking at jars

 

I need to think about this as the station building and cook house would also be corrugated Iron  also  try to wrap my head around the Oast house spiral rooves  is  also given me brain fade   ( I may cheat and  build them as  square kilns) still at least that is  only a mix of brick wood cladding  and tiles..............

 

Nick

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.........  also  try to wrap my head around the Oast house spiral rooves  is  also given me brain fade   

Making conical roofs (any photos I've looked at don't appear to be spiral) should be fairly straightforward.  Draw out the building to scale; project the cone of the roof up to a point and then measure the length of the slope from tip to bottom edge.  Draw a circle of this radius on card, then a second one whose radius is the 'extra' bit you added on to take it to a point.  Cut this out then curve it round until it fits a circle whose diameter is the width across the base of the roof.

 

Seemples Igor!  :-)

 

Jim

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Making conical roofs (any photos I've looked at don't appear to be spiral) should be fairly straightforward.  Draw out the building to scale; project the cone of the roof up to a point and then measure the length of the slope from tip to bottom edge.  Draw a circle of this radius on card, then a second one whose radius is the 'extra' bit you added on to take it to a point.  Cut this out then curve it round until it fits a circle whose diameter is the width across the base of the roof.

 

Seemples Igor!  :-)

 

Jim

O level maths was forty years ago and I only scraped a pass then  however I will give the theory a try in time as I would prefer round kilns although research suggest square kilns where use originally

 

 

all this talk has made me itchy to crack on with this  what little time I have been inclined  to do actual model has been spent on the area groups plank,  sorting out fiddle sticks and then only at a CAD level although they now look ready to cut MkII

 

 

Nick

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I've admired pictures of your corrugated iron buildings and am hoping mine isn't too poor in comparison. Can you remember which brand of coffee the lid came from by any chance?

 

Mim

Afraid I've no idea what the lid I use was from, I've had it for years. Pretty much all lids have serrations of some sort to aid grip so a quick look around the shelves of your local supermarket should come up with something suitable.

 

Jerry

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Afraid I've no idea what the lid I use was from, I've had it for years. Pretty much all lids have serrations of some sort to aid grip so a quick look around the shelves of your local supermarket should come up with something suitable.

 

Jerry

Thanks Jerry

If anyone sees an apparently crazy person going along a supermarkets coffee aisle with a vernier caliper, stop and say hello. It will either be me, or Nick!

 

Mim

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Roofing tiles applied to round (or square) oast house roofs were the standard 10½" high x 6½" wide x ½" thick size first established by law in 1477 (yes, really).

 

They are best modelled in paper, standard printer paper at around 10 thou is actually way too thick but looks the part. Draw up a scale cutting guide and print it out, then for each line of tiles cut almost to the top of the line. This will enable you to lay each line of tiles horizontally as they will open up marginally to allow for the conical shape in exactly the same way as the prototype ones do. I would use artists' acrylic gloss varnish as the adhesive.

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I used newsprint ( just an A4 sized piece cut from a newspaper) for the slates on my signal box.  I worked out that 10 sheets = 0.6mm, i.e.a sheet is 0.06mm thick.  This falls neatly between the scale 0.083mm of a ½" thick slate and the 0.0415mm of a ¼" thick one.   80 gsm is around 0.01mm thick (10 sheets = 0.1mm).   Painting with acrylic paints gives a slight sheen to the finish.

 

Jim

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See also Julia's "mangle" at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=23703&start=100#p434453

 

Similar to David Long's suggestion, I picked up some from an exhibition fairly recently (probably Railex 2016 or 2017). I think it was from Ambis, and profile appeared to be about 0.5mm so fairly accurate for 2mm scale. See details of their larger products at http://ambisengineering.co.uk/EIW.pdf

 

I've also had some success in using a suitable razor saw blade to "scrape" styrene sheets, though only on small areas.

 

David

Edited by Gingerbread

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See also Julia's "mangle" at http://www.rmweb.co.uk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=23703&start=100#p434453

 

Similar to David Long's suggestion, I picked up some from an exhibition fairly recently (probably Railex 2016 or 2017). I think it was from Ambis, and profile appeared to be about 0.5mm so fairly accurate for 2mm scale. See details of their larger products at http://ambisengineering.co.uk/EIW.pdf

 

I've also had some success in using a suitable razor saw blade to "scrape" styrene sheets, though only on small areas.

 

David

If I had the skills and lathe the mangle is preferred option but  someday's  I can barely solder let alone use  anything clever   :nono:

 

however the Ambis stuff reading their site is imported so sound like one of the products suggested by David  earlier,  no online  ordering facility so will see what my mail brings but at £4.50 a pack looks most suitable

 

Watch this space

 

Nick

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Another possibility to consider - Nigel Ashton used Redutex to good effect for his corrugated goods shed for Llangerisech. See http://festiveroad.net/wealden2mmblog/archives/541 and I think the product is found at https://www.dccsupplies.com/item-p-107506/corrugated-roofing-weathered-redutex-148ti121.htm

 

As I recall the general opinion of Redutex is that scale is very variable, this is one of their more accurate offerings.

 

You can also see some of my buildings using a mixture of techniques on the Wealden Blog at http://festiveroad.net/wealden2mmblog/archives/691

 

David

Edited by Gingerbread

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If I had the skills and lathe the mangle is preferred option but  someday's  I can barely solder let alone use  anything clever   :nono:

 

however the Ambis stuff reading their site is imported so sound like one of the products suggested by David  earlier,  no online  ordering facility so will see what my mail brings but at £4.50 a pack looks most suitable

 

Watch this space

 

Nick

Nick,

 

If it's any use, i've got a spare packet of the 'Builders in Scale' corrugated aluminium that David mentioned. It's the N scale, 10ft wide version (item code 402). Happy to pop it in the post if you send me your address by email/pm.

 

Andy

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This model of the footbridge at St Erth uses Campbells HO scale corrugated iron.

I see no point in even making the stuff when products like this are available. I agree with Jerry and others that in this case effect is more important than exact scale.post-9850-0-52447800-1516346021_thumb.jpg

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Andy is kindly sending me some Builders in Scale  corrugated aluminium  I have also sourced some from Ambis mentioned by David it is extremely thin and delicate but look the part   their web site is a bit naff but a email exchange and paypal order yesterday produced delivery today, I will need to redesign the huts but thats not a huge issue

 

 

 

 

Canterbury show tomorrow so may be a few days until I get round to doing anything

 

Nick

Edited by nick_bastable
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I dug out the coffee jar lids I use to make "corrugated stuff" and grabbed a couple of shots.

post-7249-0-48849800-1516467312_thumb.jpg

 

post-7249-0-77845200-1516467339_thumb.jpg

 

 

They are 1990s vintage Nescafe lids.  The lids nowadays are a bit "designer" and are unsuitable so other brands or products might have more suitable lids.

 

Pitch of the ribbing is about 0.70mm, overscale for iron but as people have said earlier, the HO scale product appears to work OK in a 2mm context.

 

The lids I have are tapered so they need to be used as shown, in opposition to each other.

 

Just ordinary aluminum kitchen foil will do. I'm using Tesco Strong Foil here.

 

Incidentally, it will never, ever  be "nesslay" to me, always "nessuls".  The Milky Bar Kid says so.

 

Mark

Edited by 2mmMark
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well this has prompted a interesting thread,    Andy's  care package  arrived today very similar to the Ambis stuff only wider. 

 

Having watched Rolvenden  https://www.scalefour.org/shows/S4North2012/rolvenden.html   today at the Canterbury show with close interest they have got a lot awfully right  including the gauge....   If line No16 comes close to capturing Kent like that I will be very happy

 

Tomorrows master plan is cutting the fiddle sticks for the area groups plank and hopefully cutting the hoppers huts  ( my side bet is these are famous last words  :jester: )

 

Nick

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