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5 hours ago, CF MRC said:

One couldn’t sleep easy in one’s bed knowing that a lamp iron was missing from the tender inside front sheet. So I fitted one. 
783B49AD-07F2-4F9D-92B4-6C71D3C22ECE_zps

i also reduced the size of the sandbox horizontal linkage. 

Tim

 

You win Tim. I give up trying to find things for you to add

 

Unless you want to go for the second fire iron bracket for a full house!

 

2104125745_ButlerHenderson04052008012.jpg.64bf06bf678bd0249818b69a00cbd6a1.jpg

 

You can just make out our recently departed mutual friend Roy in the background so it was worth showing the photo for that alone.

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Good point Tony.  I had forgotten about that.  The fire irons might actually offer some protection to the front cross. 
 

Tim

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A few details at the back and the second fire iron support. 
5B099AAF-2D12-4609-BC98-1ADC7F104B63_zps

Tim

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Gorgeous! (The tender, not you Tim!).

 

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On 09/10/2019 at 13:16, CF MRC said:

The GNR N2 failed to proceed on Copenhagen Fields at Fareham last weekend. It was made by the great Denys Brownlee and has run for 30 years, probably covering many hundred of real miles in that time.  

962DB80B-F26C-454C-8ED3-21ABC5BE308D.jpeg.5dd50efb137696b1201cb9b842adcf85.jpeg

It is very rare for me to have two engines on the go at once, but I thought this deserved a ‘12 hour chassis’ - so it jumped the queue. 

 

On examination, I found that the 1/16” axles were worn by 0.1mm. 

D1833277-6250-4B06-B934-5828151336C1.jpeg.f0af9b8541863bf8d57fc2f4693d2b5c.jpeg

They were put in a step collet and have been re-profiled to 1.5 mm diameter. 

D829B7BD-AFF8-4A21-BCDE-ECBB0928A82D.jpeg.fc6ba40ee886c5b13d8deeac464b9102.jpeg

A3FD6382-18B9-4730-BF8D-7435F4138A66.jpeg.e58a0e55b64f563d1e82b5d96199b6d9.jpeg

On looking closer I also noted significant wear on the coupling rod pins.  Denys had used remarkably thin  (for him) steel for the rods and it had ‘cut in’.  The new rods will be made twice as thick. 

 

The chassis has been made with brass frames and tapped acetal spacer blocks.  The frames were separated from the blocks and one sweated to two pieces of brass to act as a pattern for the replacement chassis. 

75C6A607-AF31-46B8-878C-E2FFDE00CAAC.jpeg.a0fcfc004bf7620d84c6d50dc57b2b94.jpeg

 

The old holes were located using an equivalent size drill upside down as a plug fit in the drill press, with the frames held accurately in a vice on the X - Y table of my mill - drill.  Once the location was correct, the drill was used correct way up to make the hole.   The axle holes were drilled by dead reckoning, using the table to set the coupled wheelbase (the rods will be made the same way). 

87D4E51F-B0E1-4E90-B70D-EBAE95847B10.jpeg.251408ae6b66c4b996ebb7c6f0c648e4.jpeg

Once all the holes were made, the new chassis was filed up to shape using the old one as a pattern: the image shows the three pieces still sweated together. 

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I am fairly confident that I will be able to re-use some of Denys’ acetal spacers.  It would be appropriate to keep as much of the original as possible. 

 

Tim

 

 

 

Thanks for that Tim, I've always wondered how to exactly position drills into pre-existing holes...and there you go!

Cheers

Simon

 

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You’re welcome Simon.  I try to put hints and tips into these posts that may not be immediately obvious unless you’ve been there...
 

Tim

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I spent a pleasant weekend at the London Model Engineering exhibition whittling some styrene on the MRC demonstration stand.  All it has to do now is cast OK. 
6A3F5317-D0D5-42CC-90AF-9FAB0C0ABE19_zps

 

Tim

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That's a b****y big shovel that's sitting in the fire hole!  How does the fireman manage to manipulate that?  :jester:

 

Jim

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1 hour ago, CF MRC said:

I spent a pleasant weekend at the London Model Engineering exhibition whittling some styrene on the MRC demonstration stand.  All it has to do now is cast OK. 
6A3F5317-D0D5-42CC-90AF-9FAB0C0ABE19_zps

 

Tim

 

How many of the model engineering folk passed by muttering about your sanity?

 

Most of them won't ever have seen components that small for anything in their lives.

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40 minutes ago, Caley Jim said:

That's a b****y big shovel that's sitting in the fire hole!  How does the fireman manage to manipulate that?  :jester:

 

Jim

 

Might it be a spare from a 4mm version? ;)

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11 hours ago, CF MRC said:

I spent a pleasant weekend at the London Model Engineering exhibition whittling some styrene on the MRC demonstration stand.  All it has to do now is cast OK. 
6A3F5317-D0D5-42CC-90AF-9FAB0C0ABE19_zps

 

Tim

 

Cast? Purely for single-piece strength, and added weight if in heavy metal? Or are you now making preparations for building a fleet of locos with similar cab fittings?

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4 hours ago, gr.king said:

 

Cast? Purely for single-piece strength, and added weight if in heavy metal? Or are you now making preparations for building a fleet of locos with similar cab fittings?

It’s a pattern for investment casting, Graeme. A one off.
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Will certainly add useful weight in the right place.  One 9P is enough!

 

Tim
 

 

Edited by CF MRC

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It's the 9Qs which you'll be building a small fleet of then presumably ;-)

 

Simon

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The only other GC engine that could grace CF would be a Director, Simon. That is exceedingly unlikely now we have Valour on the way. I’m also not sure that I really like their proportions. 
 

Tim

Edited by CF MRC

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Tim,

 

There are actually quite a few other GC types that made it to KX in the period covered by CF, but, given that another Pullman or a Cleethorpes/Grimsby special isn't really representative of the broader picture, I think that Valour is an entirely fitting representative of the GC.  All the more so given the intended purpose of the real loco and the quality of your workmanship on the model.

 

Simon

Edited by 65179

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10 hours ago, 65179 said:

Tim,

 

There are actually quite a few other GC types that made it to KX in the period covered by CF, but, given that another Pullman or a Cleethorpes/Grimsby special isn't really representative of the broader picture, I think that Valour is an entirely fitting representative of the GC.  All the more so given the intended purpose of the real loco and the quality of your workmanship on the model.

 

Simon

 

1556020037_1340LH380514KingsCrossSta.LNER6101.jpg.116a451ef8652f2d18419f778c8728ee.jpg

 

To illustrate Simon's point about other ex-GC locos appearing at KX, another photo from the camera of my late grandfather; this one has recently been digitally restored by Steve Armitage who has also added the caption and copyright information at the bottom. I don't know if this would be within the time period on CF?

 

Andy

Edited by 2mm Andy
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Cracking picture, Andy, but not as pretty as a 9P, in my opinion.  Modelling ‘typical’ means that one GC engine is enough for CF. 
 

Tim

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23 hours ago, CF MRC said:

The only other GC engine that could grace CF would be a Director, Simon. That is exceedingly unlikely now we have Valour on the way. I’m also not sure that I really like their proportions. 
 

Tim

 

Not necessarily Tim,

 

http://shedbashuk.blogspot.com/2016/01/kings-cross-1933-1951.html

 

Interesting to note an B2 and B7 at King's Cross shed on the 29th April 1933 (OT: there are a couple of D49s listed too!). 25th May 1935 shows two A5s (some where based there), a B4, an N5 and an O4. Finally, the 27th February 1938 finds a solitary B2 representing the former GCR.

 

Some spotter notes that I have covering 1935-36 shows a B2, two B3s, two B4s and a B7 being copped between King's Cross and Hadley Wood. Furthermore, the RTCS green series states that C4 got transferred to Cambridge between April 1936 and April 1938 (Yeadon's states this too), which was used mainly on the slow trains to King's Cross and occasionally the buffet express (although this was rare due to a 40mph speed restriction on the loco between Cambridge and Hitchin).

Edited by Atso
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Sorry Tim.  I didn't mean to set a hare running!

 

Simon

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Looks excellent Tim but I'm not sure I'd want that poured in my fillings - looks a bit hot to me!

 

Jerry

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Gold is a beautiful and durable restorative dental material, but is used less and less these days.  Don’t worry, Jerry, it is generally fitted as an indirect solid restoration.  However, cohesive gold (leaf) could be malleted into a cavity - I wish I could say I had done some, but it had completely fallen out of favour in the UK by the time I graduated.  If this casting had been made of gold it would have put some useful weight where it’s needed. The casting fits perfectly, but I am currently working on a signal gantry for CF, so final finishing will wait a while. 
 

Tim

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Are you going to get the pipework copper plated, or does the lab no longer have the gear for that now that copper band impressions are no longer used?  ;)

 

Jim

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No real need Jim. It’s quite a warm alloy as it is.  I used to like using compo, copper rings & copper dies for inlays: Cecily has one that is now 42 years old. 
 

Tim

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