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14 minutes ago, Reorte said:

 

What would a laser system do that a bit of metal hanging in the right place can't?

 

(OK I can think of one or two, such as being able to measure for the route the train is supposed to be taking, but on the surface it feels like making things high tech for the sake of it).

Thats what they used to use, only the metal was mercury in a glass U shaped tube that was meant to break when struck and breaking the current supply.

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With the number of different wagon and container types around nowadays, diverting such trains is a nightmare for Controls. In fact, during the Lamington Viaduct closure in early 2016, a container train was routed (on Control authority) from Barassie towards the GSW route via Annbank instead of via Kilmarnock, only to be stopped at Falkland when we realised it was not authorised via Annbank ! That one cost us quite a few delay minutes........

 

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4 hours ago, RJS1977 said:

Bring back loading gauges.... ;-)

Apparently the loading gauge at Wakefield Europort was turned off as the loco kept triggering it, the report is somwhere on the RAIB site. 

I don't know about Australia but in the late 90s in USA there was a diverted stack train that shaved the roofs off a few containers and knocked some box's off its wagons when it went under a Freeway bridge

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33 minutes ago, RP82 said:

Apparently the loading gauge at Wakefield Europort was turned off as the loco kept triggering it, the report is somwhere on the RAIB site.

Its the same report as the Basingstoke canopy one

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/547c9006ed915d4c0d000187/R212009_090812_Basingstoke.pdf

They basically needed a curvy laser beam. Or a nicely shaped bit of wood hanging from an arm.....

Edited by Talltim
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On 21/01/2020 at 12:41, Reorte said:

 

What would a laser system do that a bit of metal hanging in the right place can't?

 

(OK I can think of one or two, such as being able to measure for the route the train is supposed to be taking, but on the surface it feels like making things high tech for the sake of it).

 

But this is the 21st century!

Something as simple as hanging a bit of metal would never do when a nice new high tech laser can do the job :rolleyes:

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20 minutes ago, Ken.W said:

 

But this is the 21st century!

Something as simple as hanging a bit of metal would never do when a nice new high tech laser can do the job :rolleyes:

 

Quite! Although I do admit to a bit of a built-in bias, because given half a chance I'd probably be saying "bits of flint have always been sufficient for everything!"

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I understand there's a new PhD course opening to investigate the creation of a laser beam which will follow a W8 loading gauge ..............................

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2 hours ago, Ken.W said:

 

But this is the 21st century!

Something as simple as hanging a bit of metal would never do when a nice new high tech laser can do the job :rolleyes:

Yes, but an automatic detection system could immediately contact the signalling centre to advise that the bridge has been hit, and so stop a train from derailing or worse.

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Here's a radical idea. Since HGV drivers are so useless, ban all trucks completely, and deliver everything in a massive fleet of Transit vans* instead. They're much lower, and aren't going to hit any bridges, are they...???

https://www.google.com/amp/s/metro.co.uk/2019/10/16/van-sliced-two-going-really-low-stonea-railway-bridge-10926417/amp/

It is believed the van was a write-off

No??? Really???

 

:tease: :fool: :jester:

 

* and before the inevitable "deliver everything by train" gets posted up, just a reminder that most town's railway goods yards went LONG ago, & even when they still existed, the railways often ran some of the largest fleets of road delivery vehicles at the time.

Heck, my nearest 'big town' of Dudley doesn't even have a Passenger Station, never mind a Goods Yard!! So much for "deliver by train".....

Edited by F-UnitMad
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On 21/01/2020 at 06:07, RP82 said:

I don't know about Australia but in the late 90s in USA there was a diverted stack train that shaved the roofs off a few containers and knocked some box's off its wagons when it went under a Freeway bridge

 

And at least one situation in the US where the main line has been lowered for double-stacks, but the loop alongside hasn't. Train diverted on to the loop ...

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2 hours ago, F-UnitMad said:

Here's a radical idea. Since HGV drivers are so useless, ban all trucks completely, and deliver everything in a massive fleet of Transit vans* instead. They're much lower, and aren't going to hit any bridges, are they...???

https://www.google.com/amp/s/metro.co.uk/2019/10/16/van-sliced-two-going-really-low-stonea-railway-bridge-10926417/amp/

 

 

No??? Really???

 

:tease: :fool: :jester:

 

* and before the inevitable "deliver everything by train" gets posted up, just a reminder that most town's railway goods yards went LONG ago, & even when they still existed, the railways often ran some of the largest fleets of road delivery vehicles at the time.

Heck, my nearest 'big town' of Dudley doesn't even have a Passenger Station, never mind a Goods Yard!! So much for "deliver by train".....

 

 

I think that there's at least one bridge just East of Bodmin Road (Parkway) which is/was close in an ordinary car and possibly one in Plymouth which is pretty tight.

 

 

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39 minutes ago, PhilJ W said:

Right alongside the NRM.

No - it's the bridge at the other end of Leeman Road, a good way past the NRM site.  The houses in the background area giveaway.

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Just in case bus drivers aren't familiar with what road signs mean

its actually got 'low bridge' painted on it. How much clearer can you make it! :)

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5 hours ago, The Stationmaster said:

No - it's the bridge at the other end of Leeman Road, a good way past the NRM site.  The houses in the background area giveaway.

 

Plus the bridge by the NRM site's more like a tunnel as it passes under the north end of the platforms.

That one's on the two-track section just past the TPE depot.

 

3 hours ago, rab said:

Just in case bus drivers aren't familiar with what road signs mean

its actually got 'low bridge' painted on it. How much clearer can you make it! :)

 

And it's signed as 10'9", you'd just about get a single decker through there, never mind trying to with a double decker :angry:

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At 10'9", I don't think I could get my motorhome through there.  I have the height of it on labels on the rear view mirror, in both Imperial and metric. (Doing conversions at 65 mph is a tad risky.)

(Apologies if I've posted this before)

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