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4472 Flying Scotsman 5"


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Thanks for the positive response . Following a set of Don Youngs drawings . Think i`m going to stick with A1 earlier variant . Decided to keep the frame lightening holes from the off . So just need to follow it through and not mix era`s . Reference and more reference  required to keep me in check . Reading through all the blog posts and forum posts with pictures has been a must . Last error i found on the drawing that i needed to verify . Was the centre line of the buffers on the front beam . The holes measure  as central of the beam on paper . But the dimension calls for an off set . Dimension was 7/8 from top face i believe . So took a trip through the modeleng proboard and found your freshly drilled front beam and then checked for early pics of FS . Off set it was .  And yes i think the Star and Intermediate Boiler Stay are now one item , not separate . Learning all the time and enjoying it i must say . While i`m here . If i get any conundrums in the future on keeping the right parts for the era , and can`t solve it on my own . Would it be possible to contact you via the new blog ? I wont pester as i like to try and find things out myself . But i would be stupid not to ask someone who has gone to a lot of trouble to get as much information as possible .

    Again , thanks for the enthusiasm . Good luck with your own wonderful model .

       Cheers for now ,

                                    John .

      

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Hi John

 

By all means sir, feel free to contact me at any time...you won't be alone, there are a number of builders who ask the odd question here and there.  I'd like to think that I know FS very well now but always finding something new as my reference libary continues to grow.

Don Young's 'Doncaster' is the best set of model drawings out there, very close to full size in detail and accuracy.

You won't go far wrong using those as your basis.

 

Keep up the great work, I hope you do start a thread, I for one will follow it closely.

 

Regards

 

Pete

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Hi guys
I've changed a few parts on the relief valves, as mentioned last time, I planned to tidy up the adjusting screws a little, well I did a little more than that after doing some long pressure tests. Not much changed but details can be found on the same link as last time. I could probably remove the protruding part of the adjuster screw completely to make it very much as per prototype but think it prudent to leave alone for now.
 

 

Pete

20201127_175421.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi guys/gals

This isn't an update so much as a behind the scenes introduction to my recently acquired test boiler which once tested, cleaned down and with some new fittings will be used to test all of the backhead fittings, clacks, safety valves and injectors as they are built. It has also been pointed out to me that this monster should easily be able to test the chassis in steam straight after she is set up on air. That could prove to be a worthwhile bonus in getting the timing right from the offset, we shall see..

 

Next update shouldn't be too long away, it will contain the fitting of the 3 cylinder slide bars.

Pete

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Evening all, it's been a few weeks but I have now uploaded the latest blog entry. This time it's the fitting of the slide bars, well two of them, I'll fit the last bar over the weekend. Note to self, I need scale sized fingers...

 

http://4472flyingscotsman.co.uk/slide-bars-2/

 

Pete

 

NB: I give up with the image... see it in the blog guys... sorry

20201211_172531.jpg

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Evening all, a new entry for the blog although I have added this to the 'news' section as it's not actually part of the build but important none the less. This entry covers the building/design of my weighbridge, very simple to do and can be made to fit anyone's loco stand.

http://4472flyingscotsman.co.uk/weighbridge-to-measure-individual-axle-wheel-weights/

Pete

 

 

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Tonight's update (sorry for the delay, I had a break over Xmas) covers part 1 of the crosshead fabrication. In Don's words, he states that the trickiest part on the whole model was probably the steam sander bodies? well tricky maybe but the crossheads are going to take some time to complete and probably as much work as the coupling rods with their fish bellied profile which included the fluting. Anyway, here's part one which covers getting the blanks ready for profiling.

 

http://4472flyingscotsman.co.uk/crossheads-part-1/

 

Pete

20210107_145049.jpg

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3 hours ago, tigerburnie said:

What material do those faces run against Pete?

 

Gauge plate, both the slide bars and the slippers are of the same material.. there will be a constant layer of oil between the two.

 

Pete

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When I worked building machine tools we used Turcite in that sort of situation, just wondered if it would be an upgrade? Had it been running on bronze then I guess the need would not arise,just a thought.

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Hi Tiger

 

An interesting suggestion which I think your saying to use for the slipper,  I see why you suggest turcite with it's self lubricating properties but I doubt that it has enough tensile strength. The slipper although just a sliding part will also be subjected to some hammer blow from the action of the con rod, a plastic isn't likely to last long in such a situation, IMHO, of course. Some use bronze to good effect and again I can see the reasons why, in fact the drawings state 'bronze' although this would need tinning to look right. However I have spoken with some fellow model engineers who have found gauge plate very good with many years of use with no wear if lubricated properly. I guess one could use mild steel with gauge plate slide bars but I prefer to use gauge plate for its strength and stability. I wonder what they use full size?

 

Kind regards

 

Pete

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ah... just read up on Turcite, should have done that first...:)  I had assumed it was like acetal...no, most certainly not suitable as a bearing surface... reading it's description, it captures grit and destroys bearing surfaces very quickly... that would be very bad on a steam locomotive with all the ash which gets everywhere...:)

 

Pete

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It was used in machining centres on the slideways for the tables and also on the headstocks, dirty areas where a lot of swarf was about, but of course, not subject to shock forces as would happen in a steam engine application. It was tough stuff, we used to cut the oil ways by hand which took some effort. It was eventually replaced with linear bearings, I think gibs on lathes and milling machines are still faced with turcite where bearings aren't employed.

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Crossheads Part 4... I'm now at a stage where I can breathe a little easier, I have finished the machining for the front area (rear will be the last part to do). From this stage on it's all down to hand grinding/filing and polishing, I have made a very small start at the end of this entry. On a footnote, can anyone tell me what a full-size cotter pin measures? preferably that as fitted to an LNER/BR Pacific? thanks
 

http://4472flyingscotsman.co.uk/crossheads-part-4/

 

Pete

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Crossheads Part 5... there's a lot of work in this one and I still have a long way to go. I was hoping to have finished the crosshead and mounting plates for this entry but the lathe decided to shred its V belt which meant I couldn't turn up the last 'button' required. probably a good thing really as this entry was getting a bit long. Hope you find it of interest.

 

http://4472flyingscotsman.co.uk/crossheads-part-5/

 

Pete

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The crossheads are very close to being called finished (for now that is, there will be some fine polishing for all parts made to date at the end) As can be seen the oil reservoir has been made and bolted to the slipper. I decided to silver solder the inner bolt heads as the model doesn't need 4 practical bolts to hold the reservoir on, makes life easier. The top side face of the crosshead where it touches the slidebar has also been rounded off as mentioned last time. I have made a 5/32 x 40 oil plug with a small central hole to avoid a vacuum which would stop the oil flowing.
The last job to do here other than the 'drop link', is a small copper pipe which comes out of the bottom of the reservoir, is angled approx 45 degrees towards the front (others will be handed) and then snakes back to the centre of the gudgeon pin. I hope to post a blog update covering all of this end of the week, count this as a taster...

 

Pete

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good day, all.. well, I think that I can finally say that the crossheads are completed. I still have the drop links to make but they are separate parts, I'll make those next. I do have one final operation to do which I detailed in the blog, it's only cross-drilling the little end journals, that will be my first job Monday.
I also listed the next stage of the build, when that work is done, (could take a while) I'll have pistons connected with the wheels, another important milestone reached.

 

http://4472flyingscotsman.co.uk/crossheads-part-7-oiling-system/

 

Pete

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