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Kylestrome

Kinlochmore – West Highland, 4mm P4

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That does look very good and Santa was on the money !  At least you also get a new biscuit  tin/ sarnie box for work and a loco for home time - ultimate win, win I guess.  Layout does look so very good and as noted by many evocative of the area and time.  

Festive greetings as well. 

 

Robert     

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Wow! David this really is a fantastic layout. Everything about it is spot on. It just oozes West Highland atmosphere. Great backscene, scenery and attention to detail. 

This is such an inspiration for my own layout. You've set the bar on the top notch. If mine looks half as good I'd be happy. Really enjoyed catching up with this thread this morning. Please keep posting pics.

 

Andy

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Stunning layout. You have captured the feel of the West Highlands so well. Takes me back to my youth. Lovely! 

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In the open wagon, what product have you used to represent the whisky barrels? 

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Hi another question, but what size is the layout please?

 

Also would love to see some more pictures of the layout.

 

Thanks

 

David

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On 01/03/2020 at 16:26, Ben04uk said:

In the open wagon, what product have you used to represent the whisky barrels? 

 

Base-Toys L01 - '54 gallon Hogshead Large Barrels', 16 in a pack. I got mine from Hattons.

 

David

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15 hours ago, Windjabbers said:

Hi another question, but what size is the layout please?

 

The scenic section is 250 x 45 cm (8' 2" x 1' 6" in old money). There is a four road fiddle yard traverser which is 96 cm (3' 2") long that can accommodate a maximum length of train equal to a Class 37 and two coaches. At the other end is a single track fiddle yard which represents off-scene industrial sidings.

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i don't know how many times iv'e been back to your thread the last couple of days because i'm blown away with it and it's really giving me inspiration for my forthcoming build especially the less is more approach , now i just need to decide if i need the 50+ locos i have or whittle it down to a select few highly detailed ones , excellent work

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Just spent a very pleasant half hour reading through this thread - my family are from this part of the world and many of them worked on the railway so the West Highland Lines are in my blood as it were.  This is masterful stuff - despite your backscene's Irish origins it really evokes the Lochaber area and I love the way it is cleverly blended in with the rest of the layout.

 

I too treated myself to SLW's 24009 a couple of months back and despite the fact that my own layout is little more than a plank at the moment (but will eventually become somewhere near Morar) it's already given me hours of fun - my first loco since starting afresh in the hobby but convinces me of there fact it's worth saving the pennies and only having the best, here's hoping Accurascale's '37's make the grade....

 

Something else that stands out is the very subtle weathering on your locos and MK1 coaches, this is something that is so often overdone, could I ask how you achieved this?

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9 hours ago, Solo said:

..................... could I ask how you achieved this?

 

Mostly with an airbrush, would be the short answer. I find it difficult to explain exactly what I did – it was a long time ago and I tend to just do what seems right at the time. In other words, I have no particular technique.

 

From what I can remember, the Mk1s were first reduced to their component parts. The ribs were sanded off the roofs before respraying. The underframes, bogies and wheels were sprayed black and then oversprayed with 'dark earth' (or similar). The ends got a bit of the dark earth treatment and the rubbing plates some additional rust colour. 

 

So far, I've only weathered the Class 25 and 27, both of which are relatively clean. The layout is set in 1968/9 so the blue livery would not really be that dirty yet. The roofs have been sprayed a dirty black colour, being careful to spray down vertically so as not to hit the sides or ends. Some the paint along the cant rail was then wiped off, in a downward motion, with a cloth to give a 'feathered' appearance. The ends just have a little bit of 'pin wash'* of some brownish colour to indicate some dirt in the seams and corners. The chassis were heavily weathered separately.

 

David

 

*https://youtu.be/LfsFGZbiDLM

 

 

 

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That's really interesting, thanks David.

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On 11/06/2019 at 14:03, Kylestrome said:

 

1449460163_ScreenShot2019-06-11at14_00_12.png.797f57836a4027fd783fa773ce25ddaa.png

 

Let's just say it's a cottage on a croft. Or a crofter's cottage? ;)

 

Thanks for your kind comments.

 

David

Careful, now: a 'cottar' was the lowest form of life hereabouts, back in the day, so 'cottage' could be taken as something of an insult;) Absolutely tremendous layout, with cracking atmosphere:clapping_mini:

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Fantastic!  The last shot of the 25 is the closest I have seen yet to reality - absolutely nothing to give the game away!  The lighting is spot on.

 

Best wishes, 

 

Paul

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On 01/08/2020 at 20:35, Kylestrome said:

In an effort to produce some reasonably decent photos of the layout, I’ve been playing around with various lighting setups in conjunction with focus stacking. I’ve also been experimenting with simulating sunlight using off-camera remote flash. Focus stacking with remote flash is relatively simple with the Olympus camera that I use. Once I have worked out how many frames are needed at what intervals, and the flash power, the process is then ‘fire and forget’ with the camera taking the shots automatically.

 

Here are some of the results after combining in Helicon Focus.

 

David

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

:O :swoon:  Blown away - superb David...

 

Edited by bcnPete
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The craftsmanship/clever button just doesn't cut it for these pics. All of the above and also inspiring and motivating for my own efforts so thanks for that.

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