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Gladiator WW2 Railgun


Garethp8873
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Gladiator WW2 Railgun has been announced by Oxford.

 

OR76BOOM01 WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330

OR76BOOM01XS WWI Boche Buster - Camouflage and ROD2330 DCC Sound

OR76BOOM02 Railgun Gladiator WWII Railgun

Edited by Garethp8873
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Excited for this! Were manufacturers actually listening when I was complaining about the lack of WW2 era stock a couple of years ago? :P since had WARWELLS from Oxford & Hattons , and soon to have warflats from Bachmann, an abundance of Southern wartime liverys from Hornby and the original Merchant Navys, the USA Dock tank from Model Rail Offers. Being thoroughly spoilt as a Southern Wartime modeller! Now if we can just have a Hunslet Austerity in as-built pre LNER condition... :P

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They picked quite a big gun too. 14in weapons (probably those originally intended for a Chilean battleship OR taken from those intended for the Greek Salamis).

 

I wonder if they will do the smaller 9.2in types some day?

 

Option 1 is Dean goods plus gun.... Hmmm would fit in with my SECR I suppose....

 

Cannot find pics of Gladiator (assume 14in too). Boche Buster was given an 18in weapon in WWII but that lacked range so never used.

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Strangely I think this will sell well.. it'll have a market beyond model railways (military museums / military collectors, even wargamers might want this). 

 

However when it comes to wish lists, I suspect Oxford takes the prize for starting at the bottom of the list and working up.

Edited by adb968008
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Traces of the specially-laid track, between Guston and St Margaret's, can be seen on the relevant OS maps. One route is still visible on Google Earth:-

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Dover/@51.1502245,1.3227435,2360m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x47dea4d1553332ff:0x32785c875ad74851!8m2!3d51.1278758!4d1.3134027?hl=en

It's next to what appears to be a solar panel site, just east of the A2.

I don't know how much is visible on the ground, or if the site is even publicly accessible. What I did notice that far fewer traces are visible on the current iteration of the image than were visible a few years ago.

Edited by Fat Controller
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Traces of the specially-laid track, between Guston and St Margaret's, can be seen on the relevant OS maps. One route is still visible on Google Earth:-

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Dover/@51.1502245,1.3227435,2360m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x47dea4d1553332ff:0x32785c875ad74851!8m2!3d51.1278758!4d1.3134027?hl=en

It's next to what appears to be a solar panel site, just east of the A2.

I don't know how much is visible on the ground, or if the site is even publicly accessible. What I did notice that far fewer traces are visible on the current iteration of the image than were visible a few years ago.

Only one bit remains, discovered when we cleared the road to Fan Bay..

Dscf4761_640.jpg

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They picked the bigger UK rail gun carriages. The carriages had 13.5in 14in and 18in.

 

I suspect Oxford's tool is for 13.5in only.

18in missed WWI and range was too short for WWII. 14in (originally intended for a Japanease battleship) were used only on 2 carriages in the last few months before the end. The 14in were disposed of  post WWI (not UK standard, while the 13.5in were).

The 13.5in could reach the French coast, especially when super charges were introduced.

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I am astonished by the low price!

 

I presume that, unlike the Bachmann crane (see RMweb passim), this won't be a movable and functional model, it will just be moulded as a fixed position on the bogies. I suspect, too, that they may be willing to compromise quite a bit on the appearance, on the basis that very few people will notice any detail errors!

 

So, while I still think that a sub-£50 price is optimistic, it looks like the right ballpark. That would also fit in with suggestions that they're aiming this as much at the military modellers and wargamers as railway modellers.

 

It should still be a heck of a model, though. I'm already wondering how I can justify the presence of one on my layout.

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The pricing doesn't make sense. Apparently they will sell you one for £49.95, or with an ROD Dean Goods thrown in for the same price, or with sound in the Dean Goods for only £99.95, dramatically less than the price of a sound-equipped Dean on its own. 

 

And I suspect at these prices the gun barrel isn't fully proofed. 

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Traces of the specially-laid track, between Guston and St Margaret's, can be seen on the relevant OS maps. One route is still visible on Google Earth:-

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Dover/@51.1502245,1.3227435,2360m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x47dea4d1553332ff:0x32785c875ad74851!8m2!3d51.1278758!4d1.3134027?hl=en

It's next to what appears to be a solar panel site, just east of the A2.

I don't know how much is visible on the ground, or if the site is even publicly accessible. What I did notice that far fewer traces are visible on the current iteration of the image than were visible a few years ago.

A couple of the Middleton Press line books have interesting images. Dover to Ramsgate (plates 30 and 31) shows the fan of sidings mentioned above, and a side view of "Peacemaker" with a 13.5 inch gun. Mention is also made of Boche Buster (with an 18 inch gun) being allocated from November 1941 with 4 LMS diesel shunters. In Faversham to Canterbury plate 71 shows the sidings at the former Stonehall Colliery site. This location between Kearsney and Lydden Tunnel was used for gun servicing and preparation and one line from the north end of Lydden Tunnel to Martin Mill via the Kearsney Loop was reserved for gun movements. I have also found a photo of a rail-mounted gun at Martin Mill, allegedly with an 18 inch gun . This is in a volume called "Kent at War" by Bob Ogley. Edited by mikeharvey22
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A rail mounted gun does seem pointless, in the big scheme of things.

 

It’s not a tank, i presume it can’t turn, so limited to pointing in the direction of the rails. The ricochet surely could be damaging to the rails it’s sits on, and how long is it to reload ?

 

It kind of feels like the last gasp of sieging a castle based warfare, was it a gun to fire at inbound ships in case of invasion ?

Edited by adb968008
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A rail mounted gun does seem pointless, in the big scheme of things.

 

It’s not a tank, i presume it can’t turn, so limited to pointing in the direction of the rails. The ricochet surely could be damaging to the rails it’s sits on, and how long is it to reload ?

 

It kind of feels like the last gasp of sieging a castle based warfare, was it a gun to fire at inbound ships in case of invasion ?

 

The rail mounting means you can have a very big battleship type gun, when tanks were fitted with only very small guns.

To aim the gun you run it along a curving siding until it is pointing in the right direction.

As the gun fires over the end of the wagon it sits on recoil is taken up by the whole gun rolling backwards down the track, presumably stopped by having the brakes part on. 

As they were based in Kent I would assume that anti invasion work was what they were intended for.

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