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Great Southern Railway (Fictitious) - Mr. Adams' Finest

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The fully-lined one is about to be re-released

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I know...

 

I'm still not that well-off!!!

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26 minutes ago, Edwardian said:

The fully-lined one is about to be re-released

 

Ooh, if only I had any savings! Trying to find a house has really messed up my finances.

 

On an entirely unrelated note, how long can a human survive without food?

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2 minutes ago, TurboSnail said:

 

Ooh, if only I had any savings! Trying to find a house has really messed up my finances.

 

On an entirely unrelated note, how long can a human survive without food?

 

It was on the Bachmann stand at York this April.  Guy Rixon and I observing ...

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2 hours ago, Edwardian said:

The fully-lined one is about to be re-released


Yes, at an RRP of £224.95! Rather more than I can afford at the moment...

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2 hours ago, TurboSnail said:

On an entirely unrelated note, how long can a human survive without food?

About three weeks, but only five days without water. 

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Well, while I'm unemployed, I might as well make the most of my free time... I dug out an old kit that I'd been intending to build for a while - a Wills Saxby & Farmer signal box. Being (I believe?) an 1880s design, it suits my idea of Linton being resignalled circa 1890-2 (just after the Regulation of Railways Act 1889 mandated lock, block and brake) quite well. I'll need to build up the running signals to resemble Saxby & Farmer products, to go with the 'box, but I feel it makes sense for a small railway company to call in a signalling contractor rather than design and manufacture their own.

 

Having mostly seen these kits built in green and cream, it does look a little odd in GSR blue and cream, but I'm sure it'll bed in nicely with the blue rolling stock and other buildings once they come to fruition. It has been a long time since I've built anything for the layout, and this signal box will hopefully eventually have lighting (albeit quite dim, given the 'box would most likely have had a single paraffin lamp hanging from the ceiling, possibly with a candle for filling out the train register?), so a full interior is being provided, from the Ratio range. Some parts of this kit have been discarded as too modern (the anglepoise lamp on the desk, for example!).

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The front wall has not yet been attached, to allow easy access to the interior, and I'm pondering a few touches to make the 'box more homely. I can't get away with a wireless, or anything electronic. What would a signalman do with his spare time in the Edwardian period?

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2 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

What would a signalman do with his spare time in the Edwardian period?

Some of them tended a small allotment adjacent to the box, or worked on the flower beds on the platform.  You could have a few potted plants around, both inside and around the box.

 

Jim

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In some of the more rural locations all sorts of things went on to fill the time between trains. The Dahlia beds tended by the Baynards signalman were notorious, and I've also heard of signalmen acting as barbers and bicycle repairmen! As Jim says, allotmenting was very common (we've actually got a small allotment behind Alresford box, I'll try to get a photo next time I'm there...)

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I was going to mention the Alresford plot. I recall Adrian Vaughan mentioning that one of the Challow signalmen did barbering. And Baynards' Dahlias were legendary!!!

 

Don't mention Bicycle Repairmen... ;)

 

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Ah, I prefer Oh Mr Porter over Oh Doctor Beeching any day - And it's such a shame that Northiam was scrapped as a nice themed gala on the MHR, as per the Titfield one on the NNR a few years back, would be fantastic! There's no preserved A12 or X6 either, so any event would be at best 'inspired by'.##

 

Is it bad that I can think of MHR volunteers who could fill the three lead roles? :O 

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Posted (edited)

So, last night, I headed off to York with my partner for a weekend away. This had been booked and paid for before I got the news about no longer having a job. Today we started working our way through the NRM. We'd picked this weekend because the L&YR signalling school model railway was being operated, and I'd never seen it before. Arriving a little early, we got chatting with the volunteer who was setting up, and after mentioning we'd come down from Scotland and an interesting chat about the Lock, Block and Brake requirements mentioned above, we were invited behind the barrier for a closer look!

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The layout dates from 1912, when it was built by apprentices at Horwich locomotive works, while the rolling stock was provided by Bassett-Lowke. It's a gauge 1 layout, although the locos and stock are rather shortened caricatures. The lamps (head, tail and side) are oversized to make them more visible to the trainees, and each "signalbox" has its own collection of red, yellow and green flags (in miniature!). In the morning, there was an explanation of absolute block signalling, with much ringing of bells and clattering of instruments and levers. In the afternoon came a demonstration of the cause of the Warrington collision of Nov. 4th, 1880 (see the BoT report here). A very minor collision, with no injuries and the only damage being broken buffer-castings!

We spent most of the day wandering around the North Shed, being basically the warehouse of material not on display in the main halls, and what a treasure trove it is! Sadly I didn't get as many pictures as I would have liked, but we will be going back again tomorrow to continue looking, as we haven't managed to look around the great hall yet.

We did get some shots of a couple of pre-grouping locos in the other building though. One for Gary here:
 

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And one a little closer to Linton (albeit in a slightly odd shade of green):

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And, of course, what trip to York would be complete without:
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There'll be plenty more tomorrow, and if anyone has any requests for detail shots, let me know before about 1pm!

Edited by Skinnylinny
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Well, being a cheeky sort - Some detail (and wider) shots of the 3-SUB car would be very useful. I took a few when I was up there last month, but nothing like enough. 

 

Also, a game for you to play - Count the NLR Adams 4-4-0T Models... ;) 

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Sure, I can do that - any areas of the 3-SUB in particular of which you want photos?

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Not especially, though some decent shots showing the whole of the car, and some overall shots of the bogies. I didn't get any of the front end of the unit, so any details round there would be very much appreciated. :) 

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I can do bogie shots but the end is hard to get to, the best position for photographing being in the turntable pit! With the driving car positioned between other stock, it's hard to get far enough back to get the whole vehicle in, but I think you ought to be well served for photos of the whole thing online. 

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I'm writing this from a Cross-Country train, returning from York to Edinburgh. The train showed simultaneously as "on time" and "cancelled" on the Network Rail website - it turns out it didn't run from its original starting point, so the original train was cancelled. They then started a new service from a few stops up the line.

The wonderful people who booked us the (one!) wheelchair space on this service managed to book us two seats at the opposite end of the carriage from the wheelchair space. About five minutes into the journey, with the help of the on-train staff and some lovely fellow passengers who were happy to swap seats, we ended up with two seats by the wheelchair space. However, the train's now so packed that people are sitting on the tables and peoples' luggage won't fit in the space, so the wheelchair is now behind a wall of cases.

 

Bring back booked compartments and loco-hauled stock (with luggage vans)! At least with loco-hauled stock, another carriage can be added to a train.

Oh, and the air conditioning has failed, so it feels like we're travelling in an oven.

The joys of the modern railway. I think that when I get home, I'll return to the pre-grouping era!

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3 minutes ago, Skinnylinny said:

I'm writing this from a Cross-Country train, returning from York to Edinburgh. The train showed simultaneously as "on time" and "cancelled" on the Network Rail website 
 

 

Aha! Schrodinger's train - you won't know which state it is in until you're on it.

 

Now I was once waiting for a late-running late evening train at an outer suburban station on the Munich S-Bahn; the clocks stopped at the booked arrival time and re-started when the train arrived. Evidently, in Germany, the trains run more reliably than the clocks!

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1 hour ago, Skinnylinny said:

I'm writing this from a Cross-Country train, returning from York to Edinburgh. The train showed simultaneously as "on time" and "cancelled" on the Network Rail website - it turns out it didn't run from its original starting point, so the original train was cancelled. They then started a new service from a few stops up the line.

The wonderful people who booked us the (one!) wheelchair space on this service managed to book us two seats at the opposite end of the carriage from the wheelchair space. About five minutes into the journey, with the help of the on-train staff and some lovely fellow passengers who were happy to swap seats, we ended up with two seats by the wheelchair space. However, the train's now so packed that people are sitting on the tables and peoples' luggage won't fit in the space, so the wheelchair is now behind a wall of cases.

 

Bring back booked compartments and loco-hauled stock (with luggage vans)! At least with loco-hauled stock, another carriage can be added to a train.

Oh, and the air conditioning has failed, so it feels like we're travelling in an oven.

The joys of the modern railway. I think that when I get home, I'll return to the pre-grouping era!

But  least you had wifi? 

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Posted (edited)

So, having got home late last night (after getting waylaid on the way home by some friends I hadn't seen in ages), and after a hospital appointment this morning, I've finally got a chance to go through the photos that were taken on Sunday and upload them.

First of all, we arrived early in order to get a chance to have a look inside the Shinkansen Series 0 - while this might be rather modern for the pre-grouping section, it is sobering to realise that at the time this sleek machine entered service in 1964, the HST was still 15 years away, and sustained speeds of 130mph were still a long way off the UK. Still are, in fact!
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Queen Adelaide's saloon is a rather beautiful piece of coachbuilding, and we spent a while admiring the intricately-lined underframe and headstocks, as well as its diminutive size compared to more modern rolling stock.

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We had booked tickets for the steam ride, as on the Sunday the rostered engine was the replica Rocket. We weren't disappointed, and it really brought home just how tiny this machine was compared to the hulking great 9F and larger overseas engines in the great hall! Fortunately, we got our ride in the open-topped carriage before the heavens opened in the afternoon.

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After this we had a wander around the rest of the Great Hall, admiring the elegant lines of the SECR D class...
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the stocky, workmanlike NER 1001 class...
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(which still has some absolutely gorgeous detailing - check out the lining on those coupling rods!)
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and of course the beautiful Topaz, resplendent in lake.
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We also had another poke around the various bits and pieces in the North Shed, the "archived" section if you will, where artefacts that aren't in the main museum are sort of half-heartedly on display, and found all sorts of treasures, from this model of an unknown loco (LB&SCR, based on the livery? The information card was missing)...
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...to an invalid chair...

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...to a company crest which confused me momentarily before remembering the existence of the Great Southern Railways Company of Ireland.
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...I might have to steal the garter though, unless I can get around to designing my own!

In response to sem34090's request - I've put up an album of the photos I was able to take of the 4-SUB driving car here on Imgur.

Edited by Skinnylinny
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And a little reminder of the eventual aim, an actual model railway! The signal box is nearly completed, needing just the steps, guttering, and a few bits of glazing, and three more parts for the interior: a signalman, a jacket hung on the peg inside the door, and a cat curled up, asleep, on the armchair. 

 

The box is shown here placed on the new E&LMRC layout which is still under construction but which makes an excellent photo plank for such things! 

 

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Well, it looks like the free time I currently have for modelling is about to be curtailed to some extent - I have received (and accepted) a job offer. It's a fair step down in terms of earnings, and a rather different field (being mostly IT based rather than engineering/manufacturing) working for a small chocolate company, but it's still much better than being on the dole.

On the other hand, hopefully I might be able to get around to getting some baseboards sorted out soon...

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