Jump to content

Great Southern Railway (Fictitious) - Signalling and Carriage Trucks


Recommended Posts

Hi Mike,

That's helpful, thanks. I've been using mostly the same settings as you, except that I've been doing 50 micron layers, and so exposing for 10 seconds. I might add a couple of seconds to that as the parts are still quite soft when coming off the printer.

I say, that file looks awfully familiar!

I think I'm finding that the further from the centre of the bed I print, the more likely parts are to peel off the build plate. Does that suggest I need to relevel it? Alternatively, I wonder if I might be better slicing the coach body into two halves...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

10 seconds should be fine for 0.050 layer thickness. but it will not harm to increase it a bit, it will just take longer to print.

 

Yes that file should look familiar and was idea for me to show what I meant with internal supports.

 

Peeling off the build plate can be put down to the following:

  • Bed needs levelling
  • Resin/bed too cold when bottom layers are printed
  • Incorrect exposure settings
  • Insufficiant raft size on bed

Slicing the coach into two halves would have the advantage that each half could be tilted say 10 degrees. I had to do this with JCL's GNR Railcar:

IMG_8175.JPG.2ae2badde238f2be4f2bc67679c67914.JPG

 

IMG_8179.JPG.b47e0d5f4bf70a1354701b72b0ab9c56.JPG

 

IMG_8231.JPG.322369d4634b1d1bf44952189a710389.JPG

 

  • Like 3
  • Craftsmanship/clever 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just thought. I have seen references to people roughening the bottom of the build plate with sandpaper to improve grip but personally would exhaust all other options first.

 

I assume your build plate is flat and not bowed in any way?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi there, also, with the printer I have, there is a minimum temperature for operating based on the resin being used. Standard resin should be at 25C+ and the 'HiTemp' should be 30C+ . For this reason I have a seedling heater pad inside the cabinet of my printer. The floor of the coach might also be causing the problem as it increases the suction between the part and the vat. It's one of the reasons why a lot of people print at an angle. I've decided not to print floors because of this problem.

  • Informative/Useful 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks all for the useful information. I'll probably have another poke at the printer this evening but I'm out at the Glenrothes exhibition today. 

 

I've spotted a Hornby T9 (no.729 with narrow cab and six wheel tender in Southern green) and I'm tempted... But what would need doing to backdate it to 1900-1910 condition? Obviously the smokebox is too long but are there other details I've missed?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Well, it's been a while - I've been rather playing catch-up with life over the past few weeks.

I bought the T9 at Glenrothes, and also The Drummond Greyhounds of the LSWR by D L Bradley. This book, apart from one useful drawing, doesn't actually contain much by way of details of the modifications to the class which would be relevant to this model. It does, however, have a general arrangement drawing, so the loco will eventually be backdated as a narrow-cab version, possibly also receiving a cross-tube firebox. The model came fitted with a DCC chip, although this was removed and passed on to a club member who uses DCC in exchange for a blanking chip, which he seemed happy enough with. It was then given a running-in turn on the club's Glendevon layout on a railtour - how else does one explain an ex-LSWR T9 in Scotland? It runs very sweetly indeed. I may even be able to forgive the traction tyres!

 

image.png.91aa0fcb18c98bd1d5b837b10f5948f4.png

 

I also picked up something rather different - an old Stewart-Reidpath 0-6-0 chassis (still in its original box and with instruction sheet. These instructions include the wonderful line "LUBRICATION is important. ... DO NOT use heavy oils - a light machine oil is best - certainly NEVER use the drainage of a car-sump or even olive oil!").

On testing, it runs powerfully and surprisingly well for its age and motor/gearing combination (3-pole motor with 25:1 gearing), with the armature acting as a surprisingly powerful flywheel, helping the chassis run well over points and isolating sections. My plan for this chassis is, if I can't find a genuine bodyshell, to design and 3D print a facsimile of the Stewart-Reidpath generic 0-6-0. The first model of NWR no.1 (well, the first *electric* model!) was such a beast, and I'd very much like to have GSR no.1 be the same basic design. image.png.275ec6343230a87afe8c58621d72b6f5.png

 

I also very nearly bought a rather nice model of Stepney, but the price was a little too high at £4 so I passed...
image.png.231d982d8c69674efbcc39e2ebcc4460.png

I've also been playing around a little more with the Photon - I seem to be getting better and better results as I tune the machine and get to know its foibles, although there are still occasional strange occurrences. I've nearly finished re-drawing my SER D-ended open wagon (which I had previously designed for laser-cutting) and decided to do a test print. In general it's come out rather nicely!
image.png.36be6785b582b4511d931e4108ba18d3.png
However, there are a couple of minor flaws on the other side - a couple of raised lines which have printed for some reason on only one face of the model, and a chunk missing from the bottom of the solebar. The axleguard is missing because I broke it off while removing supports - I'm going to be beefing these up a little as well as making the solebars and springs a little deeper. The photo does show just how crisp the details that can be produced with the Photon printer are, and I'm delighted with it, although drawing up 3D models definitely takes much much longer than the laser-cut kits.

image.png.67f113640dafb64bdc3cbf9b7df9c136.png

I reckon that If I were to get to a point where I were able to sell these wagons, the price point would not be far off that of a laser-cut kit, maybe a pound or two more a wagon.

Finally, last Tuesday was the Edinburgh and Lothians MRC model building competition. Having won this last year with two of my laser-cut Stroudley coaches, I decided to enter a complete goods train, this time with my backdated Bachmann LBSC E4 (I know it's still missing a numberplate and handrails!), an LSWR open (Cambrian kit), the above 3D Printed wagon, and assorted SER and LBSC wagons and brake, laser cut by myself. To my surprise, having brought back the trophy for the competition, I promptly walked back out with it again!

IMG_20190521_2117212102.jpg

  • Like 7
  • Craftsmanship/clever 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Skinnylinny said:

Well, it's been a while - I've been rather playing catch-up with life over the past few weeks.

I bought the T9 at Glenrothes, and also The Drummond Greyhounds of the LSWR by D L Bradley. This book, apart from one useful drawing, doesn't actually contain much by way of details of the modifications to the class which would be relevant to this model. It does, however, have a general arrangement drawing, so the loco will eventually be backdated as a narrow-cab version, possibly also receiving a cross-tube firebox. The model came fitted with a DCC chip, although this was removed and passed on to a club member who uses DCC in exchange for a blanking chip, which he seemed happy enough with. It was then given a running-in turn on the club's Glendevon layout on a railtour - how else does one explain an ex-LSWR T9 in Scotland? It runs very sweetly indeed. I may even be able to forgive the traction tyres!

 

image.png.91aa0fcb18c98bd1d5b837b10f5948f4.png

 

I also picked up something rather different - an old Stewart-Reidpath 0-6-0 chassis (still in its original box and with instruction sheet. These instructions include the wonderful line "LUBRICATION is important. ... DO NOT use heavy oils - a light machine oil is best - certainly NEVER use the drainage of a car-sump or even olive oil!").

On testing, it runs powerfully and surprisingly well for its age and motor/gearing combination (3-pole motor with 25:1 gearing), with the armature acting as a surprisingly powerful flywheel, helping the chassis run well over points and isolating sections. My plan for this chassis is, if I can't find a genuine bodyshell, to design and 3D print a facsimile of the Stewart-Reidpath generic 0-6-0. The first model of NWR no.1 (well, the first *electric* model!) was such a beast, and I'd very much like to have GSR no.1 be the same basic design. image.png.275ec6343230a87afe8c58621d72b6f5.png

 

I also very nearly bought a rather nice model of Stepney, but the price was a little too high at £4 so I passed...
image.png.231d982d8c69674efbcc39e2ebcc4460.png

I've also been playing around a little more with the Photon - I seem to be getting better and better results as I tune the machine and get to know its foibles, although there are still occasional strange occurrences. I've nearly finished re-drawing my SER D-ended open wagon (which I had previously designed for laser-cutting) and decided to do a test print. In general it's come out rather nicely!
image.png.36be6785b582b4511d931e4108ba18d3.png
However, there are a couple of minor flaws on the other side - a couple of raised lines which have printed for some reason on only one face of the model, and a chunk missing from the bottom of the solebar. The axleguard is missing because I broke it off while removing supports - I'm going to be beefing these up a little as well as making the solebars and springs a little deeper. The photo does show just how crisp the details that can be produced with the Photon printer are, and I'm delighted with it, although drawing up 3D models definitely takes much much longer than the laser-cut kits.

image.png.67f113640dafb64bdc3cbf9b7df9c136.png

I reckon that If I were to get to a point where I were able to sell these wagons, the price point would not be far off that of a laser-cut kit, maybe a pound or two more a wagon.

Finally, last Tuesday was the Edinburgh and Lothians MRC model building competition. Having won this last year with two of my laser-cut Stroudley coaches, I decided to enter a complete goods train, this time with my backdated Bachmann LBSC E4 (I know it's still missing a numberplate and handrails!), an LSWR open (Cambrian kit), the above 3D Printed wagon, and assorted SER and LBSC wagons and brake, laser cut by myself. To my surprise, having brought back the trophy for the competition, I promptly walked back out with it again!

IMG_20190521_2117212102.jpg

 

Very impressive.  Great work on the SER Open and the goods train; a well-deserved prize. 

 

Very wise to pass on that Hornby Terrier; hold out for the Rails one. 

  • Funny 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Annie said:

Wow!  A Stewart-Reidpath 0-6-0 chassis.  Those are the stuff of legends; - what a great find.

 

He had another one too, but I decided on 4'6" driving wheels over the 3'9" wheels of the other chassis. I could be tempted though... Not bad for £17!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Update for today: The SER D-ended open now has all of its external detail added, and I never realised quite how many visible  bolts there are on a wooden-bodied wagon! Working on this model has given me a much better understanding of how a wooden-framed wagon was assembled.

I still need to do the internal strapping, and there are nearly as many bolts again to do, but given that I'd like to run at least one or two of these with tarpaulins on, now seems like a good time to do another test print!

image.png.c7add5fe78ca9e41654c7fdf13828ce3.png

 

Another advantage of a tarpaulin is that it can be arranged to cover up the lettering, as I had terrible trouble with the Fox SER transfers - it seemed like they just wanted to fall apart into several different pieces. I tried warm water, cold water, leaving them for less than my usual time and far longer, and every time they just collapsed. The 5 in the running number of the above wagon had to be coaxed together from 3 pieces, and that was one of the ones I considered useable! Does anyone have suggestions of anything that would help with this? The transfers were used within 24 hours of arriving from Fox...

220464479_TransfersFail.jpg.f3c45132ba99ebc4d65f24d6b0bfe391.jpg

  • Like 4
  • Craftsmanship/clever 5
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Skinnylinny said:

Update for today: The SER D-ended open now has all of its external detail added, and I never realised quite how many visible  bolts there are on a wooden-bodied wagon! Working on this model has given me a much better understanding of how a wooden-framed wagon was assembled.

I still need to do the internal strapping, and there are nearly as many bolts again to do, but given that I'd like to run at least one or two of these with tarpaulins on, now seems like a good time to do another test print!

image.png.c7add5fe78ca9e41654c7fdf13828ce3.png

 

Another advantage of a tarpaulin is that it can be arranged to cover up the lettering, as I had terrible trouble with the Fox SER transfers - it seemed like they just wanted to fall apart into several different pieces. I tried warm water, cold water, leaving them for less than my usual time and far longer, and every time they just collapsed. The 5 in the running number of the above wagon had to be coaxed together from 3 pieces, and that was one of the ones I considered useable! Does anyone have suggestions of anything that would help with this? The transfers were used within 24 hours of arriving from Fox...

220464479_TransfersFail.jpg.f3c45132ba99ebc4d65f24d6b0bfe391.jpg

I use Microscale liquid decal film to 'restore' old decals, seems to stop them breaking up. Then use Microset and  Microsol in the usual way to help the decals adhere to the contours.

Edited by PhilH
  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's helpful, thanks Phil. I'll have to see if that helps. At £5.25 a sheet, and each sheet being enough to do only one wagon, to say I was unimpressed would be an understatement! I realise that while I had used them promptly after arrival, I have no idea how long they were on the shelf at Fox, although I can't imagine transfers for a railway company that didn't even exist in the 20th century would have the fastest stock rotation...

  • Friendly/supportive 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Seriously liking the SER wagon - though I'm still convinced that mixed media is the way to go - if you put one in my hands right now it would be off with the running gear and on with etched axleguards and 5&9 cast springs and axleboxes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Seriously liking the SER wagon - though I'm still convinced that mixed media is the way to go - if you put one in my hands right now it would be off with the running gear and on with etched axleguards and 5&9 cast springs and axleboxes.


That's entirely fair, and the beauty of these designs is that I could easily make that change for you in just a few minutes. Do you happen to know what the dimension is across outside faces of your etched axleguards, and how thick the spring castings are (to beef up the solebars if necessary)?

  • Like 1
  • Friendly/supportive 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Skinnylinny said:

Floor-bottom is 8.9mm from the axle centre-line, though that could be reduced slightly with printed pads if required. Increasing it would be a little trickier!

8.9mm would be about right. One could fit an RFM baseplate and shim very slightly to get the ride height correct. 

 

What buffers have you fitted? They're not a type I recognise.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The ones fitted here are very much not correct to prototype - they're the Bachmann round-headed sprung buffers. I still haven't drawn up buffers for the model yet. I'm not sure if the correct type are available from any small suppliers, but was considering making printed bodies to hold the H&A Models turned steel buffer heads for some strength, as I'm not sure plastic ones would be strong enough for actual buffing use. For the earlier versions of the wagon, with wooden buffer-pads, I was intending a 3D printed overlay to fit over the steel buffer head.

They should be SER-pattern three-rib buffers, which appear to have been mounted on wooden blocks on the bufferbeam.

Edited by Skinnylinny
Link to post
Share on other sites

So another print came off the printer earlier...

D47-222.jpg.2a190e06c242583320c07e9cf895969d.jpg

 

The first attempt at the roof is currently printing, and the underframe details are already printed. I'm not expecting the roof to fit perfectly first time, but we'll see how it goes. I'll put up photos of primed bits soon. There will be ridging on the roof, but Anycubic have released some new firmware that claims to be able to reduce the appearance of layering by antialiasing. I'll have to give that a try.

 

The final aim is one of these:

277196507_StroudleyD47-222FullBrake.png.742deec2a3860279398f7d27867566f5.png

Those of you who are paying attention may notice I am gradually working back towards longer prints such as the 26' coaches, as I get more confident with the printer.

Edited by Skinnylinny
  • Like 3
  • Craftsmanship/clever 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

The ones fitted here are very much not correct to prototype - they're the Bachmann round-headed sprung buffers. I still haven't drawn up buffers for the model yet. I'm not sure if the correct type are available from any small suppliers, but was considering making printed bodies to hold the H&A Models turned steel buffer heads for some strength, as I'm not sure plastic ones would be strong enough for actual buffing use. For the earlier versions of the wagon, with wooden buffer-pads, I was intending a 3D printed overlay to fit over the steel buffer head.

They should be SER-pattern three-rib buffers, which appear to have been mounted on wooden blocks on the bufferbeam.

I sell SER 3-rib buffers, including the mounting blocks. See the link in my signature. They are bored to take steel heads, with or without springs.

  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Skinnylinny said:

Ooooh, now that is useful; thank you. I foresee a Shapeways order in the next little while. What's the nominal diameter of the shaft that mounts into the bufferbeam please?

Spigots are 2.0mm, and I find it convenient to drill the headstock 2.1mm so that the print slides in. It needs to be a sliding fit so that the buffer can be rotated to the correct azimuth without damaging it.

 

BTW, these Stirling-era buffer-guides are not quite the same as those used with the wooden heads, so far as I can tell from photos. If I ever get good dimensions for the early buffers I may add those to the shop.

 

Please note also that if you are building an SER wagon with the "express" fittings, then those need to include the longer, coach-sized buffer-guides, which I also sell.

  • Informative/Useful 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Skinnylinny changed the title to Great Southern Railway (Fictitious) - Signalling and Carriage Trucks

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.