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More work done on the other, shorter platform today. The top has again been made from card and covered with Scalescenes' paving. Next will be to add the edging stones. No pics, I'm afraid.

 

I did take the completed Belpaire 3P through and due to its long tender it only just fits the turntable, although the tender-engine gap could be shortened by a couple of mms. I found a Fowler tank sound decoder so I may fit that.

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi, Jonathan,

 

as it happens I am in the process of building a platform for Clecklewyke and anticipate covering it with scale scenes building papers, like you have. I’m struggling with the Scale scenes website and I wonder whether you are using this kit:

https://scalescenes.com/product/r008-station-platform/ ?

If not can you please give me a link to what you are using.

 

Also I wonder whether you will be representing the beautiful stone screen with the arched window at the platform ends. Quite a challenge!

 

Many thanks.

 

Ian

 

 

Edited by clecklewyke

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14 minutes ago, clecklewyke said:

Hi, Jonathan,

 

as it happens I am in the process of building a platform for Clecklewyke and anticipate covering it with scale scenes building papers, like you have. I’m struggling with the Scale scenes website and I wonder whether you are using this kit:

https://scalescenes.com/product/r008-station-platform/ ?

If not can you please give me a link to what you are using.

 

Also I wonder whether you will be representing the beautiful stone screen with the arched window at the platform ends. Quite a challenge!

 

Many thanks.

 

Ian

 

 

 

Hi Ian, that's the one I'm using. Might it be best to wait until the new version arrives end of June?

 

I'm conflicted about the station building and train shed. I cannot find enough photos to show the elevation facing the platform, also representing the lightweight nature of the train shed. I set out not to slavishly copy Buxton. I have been thinking about an extended version of Bakewell/Hassop/Rowsley buildings with Skipton-type canopies which would mean no fan window, but it's early days.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

(Accidental double posting deleted)

Edited by clecklewyke

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Hi Jonathan. Thanks for your advice. I’m afraid I’m too impatient to wait for the updated version. In any case what’s good enough for you and Derwent Spa…

 

i’m sorry I can’t help with pictures of the platform side of Buxton Midland buildings: I presume the Midland had house styles for windows and doors (in fact I seem to recall that there were several house styles at different periods of the Midland’s life).

 

Your approach of combining elements of related stations is good. That’s what David Jenkinson did when he designed Kendal Castle station.I don’t envy you the task of replicating the lacy filigree that the Midlands used for its canopy is et cetera. One of the reasons I chose the LNWR was that it’ avoided such luxuries!However I guess somewhere there will be brass etchings appropriate to your need.

 

Thanks again, Ian

 

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8 minutes ago, clecklewyke said:

Hi Jonathan. Thanks for your advice. I’m afraid I’m too impatient to wait for the updated version. In any case what’s good enough for you and Derwent Spa…

 

i’m sorry I can’t help with pictures of the platform side of Buxton Midland buildings: I presume the Midland had house styles for windows and doors (in fact I seem to recall that there were several house styles at different periods of the Midland’s life).

 

Your approach of combining elements of related stations is good. That’s what David Jenkinson did when he designed Kendal Castle station.I don’t envy you the task of replicating the lacy filigree that the Midlands used for its canopy is et cetera. One of the reasons I chose the LNWR was that it’ avoided such luxuries!However I guess somewhere there will be brass etchings appropriate to your need.

 

Thanks again, Ian

 

 

Rob Brooks on here has a blog on his model of Bakewell station. He got York Modelmakers to provide the parts to make the station building including doors, windows and some of the canopy parts which are available on request to the public, so I might see how much I will have to save up to buy the various parts.

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Posted (edited)

You could just make them yourself you know... :D

 

working004.jpg.3170d8c213c70f663811eb1569a751a6.jpg

 

 

 

Re Buxton, have you come across this collection?

 

http://www.sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/aaprint/bux.html

 

http://www.sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/ws-167.html

 

And there's a shot of Buxton Midland platform side here:

 

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/b/buxton/buxton(harden1953)old2.jpg

 

 

Cheers,

 

Al.

Edited by Alister_G
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11 hours ago, Alister_G said:

You could just make them yourself you know... :D

 

Re Buxton, have you come across this collection?

 

http://www.sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/aaprint/bux.html

 

http://www.sutherland.davenportstation.org.uk/ws-167.html

 

And there's a shot of Buxton Midland platform side here:

 

http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/b/buxton/buxton(harden1953)old2.jpg

 

 

Cheers,

 

Al.

 

Hi Al, thanks for the reminders, I'd forgotten about that Disused Stations elevation photo. I feel time is not on my side and if York MM will provide the detailed bits I can get on with the rest. As I've said, I don't want a copy of Buxton, but something that looks Midland. If I went for an overall roof the building would be partly hidden as would the trains hence my thoughts on canopies. I'm thinking of a mock-up to trial the idea.

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The surface of the shorter platform was completed today and after the edging was fitted it was glued to the platform walls and left to dry under weights.

 

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I am pleased with the height of the platforms and how they looked. Just the platform ledges to fit. For these I don't wrap the surfacing cover around the strips of card as its such a fiddley job, I just glue a piece to the face.

 

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Next job is to fill in the ballast to the platform walls. The mirror that no one can look into is there because from a certain place on the viewing side you can see the reflection of Ingleborough. 

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After finishing off the platform ledges to all sides, even those you cannot see, I mocked up a sort of station building front a la Bakewell, Rowsley, Hassop and put a couple of Skipton type hipped canopies in place.

 

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I think the elevation could do with being 2 bays longer. A plain wall with a large access door/gate would be carried on at the same height and the canopy continued to the end of the platform. This would continue around to the next platform with open canopy along until level with the end of the station building. Edward Walters designed Buxton and Bakewell et al, the style, doors and windows bearing his influence.

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skilfully made platforms. Very nicely done! very nice indeed

 

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12 hours ago, chuffinghell said:

skilfully made platforms. Very nicely done! very nice indeed

 

 

Thanks Chris, they are an improvement on the previous ones which was the general idea. It would have helped if I had laid the tracks parallel to one another but they converge by 5 mm to the buffer-stops  although you cannot tell in the photos. I'm still pondering the station building and canopies but have bought Scalescenes' coursed ashlar and dressed stone sheets in readiness.

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Hmmm. I have priced up some of the components I need to make the canopy supports and looking at the York Modelmaking prices has put me off, £16 for 4 columns and I would need 30, so unless they would give me a sizable discount I will have to have a rethink as I don't have the patience to make them from scratch unlike @Alister_G

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Right,, I have decided, more or less, that the way to go is for an extended, by two bays, Bakewell-type building with an overall pitched roof supported by the parapet wall on one side and columns on the island platform a la Buxton. A canopy will be put along the column side to cover passengers boarding at platform 3. I think the roof will be made of two sheets of rigid Perspex which will be supported on 14 trusses. The columns will support 7 girders and brackets for the canopy will be fitted to the girders. Glazing bars will be minimal so that the elevation of the building and trains can be seen. I've put in an order to York Modelmaking for the parts as well as Bakewell windows and doors which @RobBrooks1 has made available from his original order. Await an email for the cost!

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A tentative start has been made to the station building. This is about the only part I can make until the York Modelmaking folks give me my quote and fulfil my order. It's the more or less plain wall that continues the side support wall for the roof. The "textures" are Scalescenes' dressed stone and coursed ashlar mounted on 5mm foam board and card.

 

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That looks spot on Jonathan, just right.

 

Al.

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The plain section of supporting wall was taken to the layout and roughly placed where it will be but I forgot to photograph it, perhaps tomorrow. You can just make it out behind the short train in the far distance! Good news is I received a quote from York Mm and duly ordered windows, doors, girders etc. 2 week turnaround time.

 

Our roving camera man paid a visit to Derwent loco on Sunday afternoon by the look of the number of engines which were out and about. One of the fitters took him up the water tower for the first shot.

 

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Edited by Rowsley17D
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I do like the coal house Jonathan. You have definitely captured the essence of that style of midland coaling facilities. Are you going to add the narrow gauge track and coal tubs? I do believe I have drawing of the tubs somewhere. It's in  one of the midland records I have or in midland style I'll have a look for you. If I don't then Dave Hunt has either got one or access to one.

Regards Lez.    

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Lovely work, Jonathan.  I can’t recall a description of your turntable. Could you possibly point me to a description of  how you  made it?

 

Thanks,

 

Ian

Edited by clecklewyke

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19 hours ago, lezz01 said:

I do like the coal house Jonathan. You have definitely captured the essence of that style of midland coaling facilities. Are you going to add the narrow gauge track and coal tubs? I do believe I have drawing of the tubs somewhere. It's in  one of the midland records I have or in midland style I'll have a look for you. If I don't then Dave Hunt has either got one or access to one.

Regards Lez.    

 

Hi Lez

 

I would be most interested to see anything you can lay your hands on. I didn't know about NG track. I have made tubs. Two are on the coal hoist and a couple more on the floor after being filled from the wagons at the rear of coaling shed.

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7 hours ago, clecklewyke said:

Lovely work, Jonathan.  I can’t recall a description of your turntable. Could you possibly point me to a description of  how you  made it?

 

Thanks,

 

Ian

 

Hi Ian, the turntable is introduced towards the bottom of page 7 and although there's not really a blow by blow description of the build. The table itself is a 50' one made by London Road Models. It went together very well.

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Yes Jonathan. The plinth is not 4 sided. on some of the coal houses and a track ran through the "bridge" or even if that's wrong there was track either side of it for sure. They loaded the tubs at ground level and lifted them up with the hoist and into the tenders or bunkers and then picked the empties up with the other hoist and lowered them onto the track on the other side of the platform and then filled them from the coal wagons the other end of the building. Even if that isn't quite right it was something very similar or the whole concept is unworkable. In LMS engine sheds volume 2 there are enough pictures of that type of coal house to be able to piece together how they worked them. If you do it this way you can run the whole operation with just 4 tubs but you can figure out how many they used in any given coal house by the number of "bays" the buildings have each side of the hoist. Buxton had two bays each side of the hoist platform as can be scene from lots of pictures of Buxton shed. It is very similar to the one at St Albans shed. The only real difference is Buxton is built from stone and St Albans is built from brick, both from the most abundant local building materials. St Albans is only around 15 miles south of one of the largest blue clay deposits in the UK and Buxton is right in the middle of some of the largest limestone quarries in the UK. 

I'll have a look over the weekend and see if I can find this drawing for you.

Regards Lez.           

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Sounds like hard, dirty and dangerous work. But then labour (and life) was cheap then...

 

I have an LNWR stage at Gormley Junction whiich would have worked in a similar way. It’s  no wonder that BR replaced  a lot at larger sheds with electrically powered towers.

 

ian

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