Jump to content
2mmMark

The new 'fonly?

Recommended Posts

Looking around on that online auction site, I've seen a few of these pop-up:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC-24V-100W-Mini-Lathe-Beads-Machine-Woodwork-DIY-Lathe-Standard-Set-Rotary-Tool/152526444106

 

s-l1600.jpg

 

Just to recap, here's a link to a 2-part article on Peter Clark's original 'fonly.

http://www.2mm.org.uk/articles/fonly/fonlypt1.htm

They look like having potential for the small hand turning jobs (chimneys, domes, whistles etc.) for which the 'fonly was intended. A Jacobs-type chuck like the one fitted to this lathe can be very accurate. As it comes, it's got a 7 step speed control but coupled with a suitable PWM speed controller (again from ebay) to give finer control, this could make a useful addition to a 2mm modellers workshop. 24V at 100W suggests a minimum of a 5 amp controller but I'd suggest 6 to 10amps to be on the safe side. This would be my choice:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-40V-PWM-Motor-Speed-Controller-10-Amp-Suit-All-DC-MOTORS-up-to-10A/142684977183

Judging by the photos, the tool rest looks to be further away from the chuck than is ideal but the design is such that it could easily be modified to improve this. Possibly simply reversing the rest would do the job.

 

There some videos on youtube showing the lathe in use for wood turning.  Here's one that's pretty informative

 

Used for wood turning, it does appear to need clamping down but for gentler turning of items like chimneys where one would be starting with round brass rod, a heavy wood base ought to be suitable.

 

I'm seriously tempted to get one to see what can be made of it.

 

As always with machine tools, proceed with caution & safety.  Even a small tool like this could launch the chuck key most vigorously.  Some of the processes shown in the auction photos are definitely questionable!

 

Mark

Edited by 2mmMark
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks quite good.

 

I shall have to put it on the Birthday Pressie list, and see if UI can swing it.

 

Otherwise, my next job is to build the 'Fonly Lathe on the last page of the 2mm Mag.

 

Thanks & regards

 

Ian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking around on that online auction site, I've seen a few of these pop-up:https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/DC-24V-100W-Mini-Lathe-Beads-Machine-Woodwork-DIY-Lathe-Standard-Set-Rotary-Tool/152526444106

 

 

Just to recap, here's a link to a 2-part article on Peter Clark's original 'fonly.

http://www.2mm.org.uk/articles/fonly/fonlypt1.htm

They look like having potential for the small hand turning jobs (chimneys, domes, whistles etc.) for which the 'fonly was intended. A Jacobs-type chuck like the one fitted to this lathe can be very accurate. As it comes, it's got a 7 step speed control but coupled with a suitable PWM speed controller (again from ebay) to give finer control, this could make a useful addition to a 2mm modellers workshop. 24V at 100W suggests a minimum of a 5 amp controller but I'd suggest 6 to 10amps to be on the safe side. This would be my choice:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-40V-PWM-Motor-Speed-Controller-10-Amp-Suit-All-DC-MOTORS-up-to-10A/142684977183

Judging by the photos, the tool rest looks to be further away from the chuck than is ideal but the design is such that it could easily be modified to improve this. Possibly simply reversing the rest would do the job.

 

There some videos on youtube showing the lathe in use for wood turning.  Here's one that's pretty informative

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfE6ZkPfbbY

 

Used for wood turning, it does appear to need clamping down but for gentler turning of items like chimneys where one would be starting with round brass rod, a heavy wood base ought to be suitable.

 

I'm seriously tempted to get one to see what can be made of it.

 

As always with machine tools, proceed with caution & safety.  Even a small tool like this could launch the chuck key most vigorously.  Some of the processes shown in the auction photos are definitely questionable!

 

Mark

Mark,

I've just ordered one, should be here within a week. I will let you know how useful it is. It looks as if the tool rest is reversible and it would be relatvely easy to make longer or shorter ones. I would like to find out if it is possible to get a chuck to fit into the tail stock.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mark,

I've just ordered one, should be here within a week. I will let you know how useful it is. It looks as if the tool rest is reversible and it would be relatvely easy to make longer or shorter ones. I would like to find out if it is possible to get a chuck to fit into the tail stock.

John

 

I haven't yet ordered one but intend to.  Adding tailstock chuck also occured to me. 

 

There are a couple of options.

 

Something like a Dremel 4486 chuck would be about the right size but would require an adapter to fit in the tailstock. The adapter shaft could made to be a sliding fit in the tailstock bearing so that could be locked in place while drilling.

 

Alternatively, a pin chuck with a non-knurled shaft could be used. Might need a sleeve to match the bearing size.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks quite good.

 

I shall have to put it on the Birthday Pressie list, and see if UI can swing it.

 

Otherwise, my next job is to build the 'Fonly Lathe on the last page of the 2mm Mag.

 

Thanks & regards

 

Ian

 

If you or anyone else is considering building the semi-'fonly on page 23 of the Feb/March 2018 magazine or even an actual 'fonly, it's worth noting that motor/chuck/mounting bracket combinations are available on ebay.  Searching for "Mini Hand Drill DIY Lathe" should show up a range of options. Some seem more robust than others, with a choice of 5-12v and 12-24v motors.

 

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

Well, my "Mini lathe beads machine" arrived today, from Equipment Transhipment Solution Ltd, M8 8HF. It looks as if it would do the job for turning boiler fittings and other small items, using gravers and files. The advantages are that it is small, the bed is 300x60mm, with an actual footprint requirement of say 340x70x70mm high. Other details as follows:

Headstock - Heavy bent aluminium angle motor and chuck support, clamped to bed with 4 Allen screws (Allen key NOT included)

Chuck - 3-jaw, 0.6 - 6.0mm, with key (marked San Ou)

Tailstock - Sliding, clamped by 2 wing nuts

Live centre - Shank 5.8 dia, 15.8 long. Bearings (pair) 12.9 dia, 13.0 long, clamped by Allen screw (Allen key NOT included).

Tool rest - light aluminium extruded angle, 30x30x1.7 thick, 50 long, slotted 6.1 wide across centre, fixed by single screw.

Distance between centres (chuck face to live centre) - Maximum 130mm approx

Covers - U-shaped sliding acrylic covers to motor and tailstock.

Power Supply Unit - 230v AC to 24v DC, variable, in 7 steps.

So far so good. However one of the acrylic covers was smashed in 6 pieces and one clamping screw was missing. Nothing that a bit of cyano wouldn't fix and that seemed much better than having to send the whole thing back and wait for a replacement, so that's what I did.

As to the tailstock, a standard Dremel chuck has a shank outer diameter of about 9.2mm so a 'top-hat' sleeve with that bore and an outer diameter of 12.9mm should allow a small chuck to be fitted in the tailstock, cyano glued into the sleeve and then clamped into the tailstock.

Equally, it shouldn't be much of a problem to make a series of tool rests to suit a range of needs.

When at high speeds, the machine is very noisy and vibrates considerably. As has been suggested, it would benefit from being mounted on a base, perhaps with an offcut of carpet underneath.

I hope that this is of some help, let me know if you would like more info.

Best wishes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follows Mark's original link shews that the item is out of stock. Has anyone found an alternative supplier of this or a similar item?

 

MarkAustin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follows Mark's original link shews that the item is out of stock. Has anyone found an alternative supplier of this or a similar item?

 

MarkAustin

Mark,

Try Googling 'mini bead lathe' or similar - you should find various suppliers of what appears to be the same product, at differing prices. I got mine from Equipment Transhipment Solution in Manchester M8 8HF. It arrived in about a week but was slightly damaged in transit.

Hope that this helps,

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Follows Mark's original link shews that the item is out of stock. Has anyone found an alternative supplier of this or a similar item?

 

MarkAustin

 

'fonly there was some sort of large searchable online auction site...

 

:jester: 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.