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MartynJPearson

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Hi Phil

 

Worlds End is possibly the most boring layout I have seen in the last 12 months.

 

It certainly isn't going to be top of the list if you want varied and intensive operation- World's End easily makes my list of favourite layouts around at the moment, but it's the architectural modelling that blows me away, the trains are almost incidental for me.

 

I've seen it several times over the last year or so and haven't got bored with seeing it yet- I'm still seeing new things I hadn't noticed before- but even if I could achieve those standards of architectural modelling, it's a style of layout I'd never contemplate building for myself because the operational interest and variety isn't there- but for me, that's the whole thing with railway modelling, it's a broad church with a huge variety of interests and approaches and I can usually find some degree of interest in most of them, even though they might not be something I'd want to model myself

 

On a personal level, I don't get the 'I only look at what reflects my own modelling interests' to attending exhibitions or magazine content-  Although my modelling is mainly pre-nationalisation steam, I'm just as happy to spend time at a show watching a really good modern image D+E layout,  There have been a few layouts mentioned (Mostyn, Tonbridge West Yard amongst others) that hit the mark for me as much as anything that fits my major 1923-48 LMS interests

Edited by Invicta
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It certainly isn't going to be top of the list if you want varied and intensive operation- World's End easily makes my list of favourite layouts around at the moment, but it's the architectural modelling that blows me away, the trains are almost incidental for me.

 

I've seen it several times over the last year or so and haven't got bored with seeing it yet- I'm still seeing new things I hadn't noticed before- but even if I could achieve those standards of architectural modelling, it's a style of layout I'd never contemplate building for myself because the operational interest and variety isn't there- but for me, that's the whole thing with railway modelling, it's a broad church with a huge variety of interests and approaches and I can usually find some degree of interest in most of them, even though they might not be something I'd want to model myself

 

On a personal level, I don't get the 'I only look at what reflects my own modelling interests' to attending exhibitions or magazine content-  Although my modelling is mainly pre-nationalisation steam, I'm just as happy to spend time at a show watching a really good modern image D+E layout,  There have been a few layouts mentioned (Mostyn, Tonbridge West Yard amongst others) that hit the mark for me as much as anything that fits my major 1923-48 LMS interests

Hi Invicta

 

It is an architectural model with as you say an incidental inclusion of trains. Just differing taste I suppose, bit like some people model pre-grouping railways and some people need to be the first with a model of the latest new livery on a class 66. Isn't that varied likes that need to be in an inclusive magazine not one for each perceived branch of the hobby. We have enough diverse modelling groups (who produce their own magazines) already.

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Twickenham MRC's Addison Rd will be at Ally Pally next weekend with LNW Oerlikons.

 

post-4476-0-07295400-1508878883_thumb.jp

 

Mmmm ... Oerlikon units ... nice ... now they're what I call real trains ... and "plum and split milk" - an excellent choice of colour scheme!

 

I might have to visit "Ally Pally" to see these.

 

(OK - I might also be visiting this show for other reasons - and to see a few people - but I definitely don't want to miss those LNWR Oerlikons.)

 

 

Huw.

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Twickenham MRC's Addison Rd will be at Ally Pally next weekend with LNW Oerlikons.

 

post-4476-0-07295400-1508878883_thumb.jp

Indeed, and I think I mentioned it! Looking forward to coming and seeing it on Sunday...

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Mmmm ... Oerlikon units ... nice ... now they're what I call real trains ... and "plum and split milk" - an excellent choice of colour scheme!

 

I might have to visit "Ally Pally" to see these.

 

(OK - I might also be visiting this show for other reasons - and to see a few people - but I definitely don't want to miss those LNWR Oerlikons.)

 

 

Huw.

 

They definitely look better in that colour scheme than they did in BR green!

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The lswr had 3rd rail on suburban lines before the first world war. The lbscr had their overhead system in place (at least in part) by 1909, the system lasting until 1928 when replaced by the cheaper lswr 3rd rail system.

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I'm surprised this one hasn't been mentioned . Most emphatically pre-grouping

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/2646-lancaster-green-ayre-now-moved-to-its-new-home/page-55&do=findComment&comment=3086955

 

And it really won't do to suggest that non-steam traction was entirely marginal until 1956-7.  3rd rail traction was a major part of the Southern Railway scene by the mid/late 30s

 

One minor curiosity is why 1500V DC on the Great Eastern is never modelled even though modelling the MSW scheme is a very well-established niche. It can't be the difficulty of modelling the OHLE as it's the same stuff as over Woodhead

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Locos.

 

People love 'em much more than they love EMUs, and the Ex-GE areas barely had any (one to shunt cars at Ilford?).

 

The other pre-WW2, let alone pre-WW1, electrified lines are rarely modelled I would suggest for the same reason. The Met gets some attention because of the Metrovicks, and SR has always had a loyal fan-base, but LOR, Wirral, L&Y, NER, NLR/LNWR etc etc, get very little love.

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Twickenham MRC's Addison Rd will be at Ally Pally next weekend with LNW Oerlikons.

 

post-4476-0-07295400-1508878883_thumb.jp

 

 

Now that looks something special!  Has it appeared in the model press yet?

 

Phil

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Has it appeared in the model press yet?

 

Not yet. ;)

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Locos.

 

People love 'em much more than they love EMUs, and the Ex-GE areas barely had any (one to shunt cars at Ilford?).

 

The other pre-WW2, let alone pre-WW1, electrified lines are rarely modelled I would suggest for the same reason. The Met gets some attention because of the Metrovicks, and SR has always had a loyal fan-base, but LOR, Wirral, L&Y, NER, NLR/LNWR etc etc, get very little love.

 

The NER is a curious one. They had the locos, but nobody has ever seen a model of the Shildon-Newport line, even though Mike Edge reports that his EB1 / EF1 kits are amongst his best sellers. The Newcastle area 3rd rail has very occasionally been modelled

 

But it would be very easy to tweak history and assume that BR were a little more enthusiastic about the GE scheme than in reality. Before I built Blacklade the alternative scheme involved a version of the Timesaver shunting puzzle done as a London Thamesside wharf served by an electrified 1500V branch off the GE in the 1950s - Timesaver meets Newcastle Quayside. It's easy enough to propose that some of the E London freight lines could have been electrified on a test-bed basis and the Shildon-Newport electrics dug out of store to do the sort of things the 15s and Bow Road 20s actually did.  Modellers' licence is employed far more on many layouts we see built

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I like it.

 

There were some wharves on the Seine in Paris served by OLE electrified branches using very similar locos - i’ll see if I can find a photo.

 

Well, look down in here to see pictures of the ones used at Port D’Austerlitz https://www.karodaxo.fr/le-mf67-ligne-par-ligne/ligne-5/

 

I get deeply confused about which lines were interconnected here, but I think the Port lines joined with those of P.O., who also used this type of loco (theirs were contemporary with and almost identical with the NER ones), but the Metro was in there too.

 

The photo below is a P.O. loco, used on the tunnel section from Austerlitz to Gare D’Orsay, where the station is now an excellent art museum. A model of this c1910 would make a fabulous layout.

 

Excuse this intrusion of French pre-grouping electrics, please folks!

post-26817-0-83734900-1521141107_thumb.jpeg

Edited by Nearholmer
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I can’t find a French equivalent of nls maps, so this is the best I can do.

 

Gare D’Orleans is the old name for Gare Austerlitz. Main line comes in from SE, and the c1900 extension, worked by electric locos, is highlighted in blue, heading NW to Gare D’Orsay. The metro punchedright through the station at high level, and crosses the river on a bridge, heading towards Gare de Lyon. The red highlighter shows where the electrified quayside railways of Society Magasins Paris-Austerlitz were.

 

Seriously trendified now https://infos.parisattitude.com/en/mode-design/

 

Raven ser only has to switch capitals to get his perfect prototype!

post-26817-0-30876500-1521146815_thumb.jpeg

Edited by Nearholmer
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I'm surprised this one hasn't been mentioned . Most emphatically pre-grouping

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/2646-lancaster-green-ayre-now-moved-to-its-new-home/page-55&do=findComment&comment=3086955

 

And it really won't do to suggest that non-steam traction was entirely marginal until 1956-7.  3rd rail traction was a major part of the Southern Railway scene by the mid/late 30s

 

One minor curiosity is why 1500V DC on the Great Eastern is never modelled even though modelling the MSW scheme is a very well-established niche. It can't be the difficulty of modelling the OHLE as it's the same stuff as over Woodhead

You answered this question yourself earlier in this thread.

 

D&E modellers like the Woodhead because it was always busy with freight and latterly, freight-only.  The GEML is overwhelmingly a suburban passenger network, even now, with hourly container trains, passenger services probably outnumbered freight by about 40 to 1.

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You answered this question yourself earlier in this thread.

 

D&E modellers like the Woodhead because it was always busy with freight and latterly, freight-only.  The GEML is overwhelmingly a suburban passenger network, even now, with hourly container trains, passenger services probably outnumbered freight by about 40 to 1.

I know a fat bald bloke who wants to have a go at the GER lines with the wires in place.

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I have seen a rather nicely done harton electric layout (harton gill iirc).

 

For a small test layout Natalie has thought about a part of the harton electric system with exchange sidings. I don't know much about the system however!

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Also on the "not seen a lot" list

 

post-13358-0-08485700-1521760478_thumb.jpg

 

We are hoping the other half of this DMU will be running on Hawthorn Dene at Ally Pally this weekend - this half (the 4-car buffet set) has two shows under its wheels but Mr Simon is expecting to have the other half done to make the correct 8-car Middlesbrough-Newcastle train.  All we need to manage is to consist the two power cars.

 

post-13358-0-07529900-1521760755_thumb.jpg

The buffet car, seen on test on Gresby.

 

Hoping to see people there.  Come and have a chat.

 

Les

 

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D&E modellers like the Woodhead because it was always busy with freight and latterly, freight-only.  The GEML is overwhelmingly a suburban passenger network, even now, with hourly container trains, passenger services probably outnumbered freight by about 40 to 1.

A quick look at the WTT will show it more like 10 to 1, but as I've explained here before, the GEML has plenty of opportunity to run all sorts of unusual trains that do run on the line using RTR stock.

 

Have been admiring the MRC's new OO layout which is a scale replica of Ingatestone station on the GEML. Looks good and will watch it being built with interest. I tihnk this will be a great GEML layout. They are trying to make it as accurate as possible, replicating the OHL as it exists today.

 

http://www.themodelrailwayclub.org/layouts/ingatestone

 

gallery_24698_4132_1067662.jpg

Edited by ruggedpeak
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There’s an interesting move afoot at our club, relevant to this thread.

 

The club’s main layout is a 30 foot long mainline junction station, western region modelled in the BR late crest, green diesel era. It is well developed and has been on the circuit for a few years now, attending most of the premium shows in that time and winning some of the silverware on occasions. There are rules about what is run, with the level of detailing, weathering and couplings etc all enforced to ensure a consistent high standard, appropriate to era and location.

 

When back in the club room however, a more relaxed approach sees a much greater variety of stock being run, reflecting the wider interests across members. We came to realise that with the exception of the MPD and perhaps some of the signalling, the infrastructure would have been pretty similar for some time into the diesel era. At the last local show, a two-day affair at Helston, we decided to have a ‘blue diesel’ day on the Sunday, scratching together what stock we could muster from across the membership. BR crimson and cream Commer vans were swopped over with yellow transits... some of the cars were replaced and hey presto, we have a modern image layout. OK at this stage not quite as meticulously adhering to the epoch as in it’s transition era guise, but it kind of worked.

 

The upshot is that as a club we have decided to pursue this with a bit more seriousness, and develop things to be flexible enough to cover both transition and blue diesel eras. The intent is that, without compromising its existing identity, it can also assume the guise of a still-to-be-modernised station in the early blue diesel era on some outings, or one of the days at a two-day exhibition.

 

The thing is, we often forget how enduring railway infrastructure can be. Yes, some stations have been completely rebuilt but there are many that have not, with only minor changes over quite a long timescale. This means you don’t have to be stuck in a time warp, and with a little ingenuity you can flex across eras when modelling railway prototypes whilst remaining appropriate to the different periods modelled.

Edited by Chamby
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Network Rail vans with BR blue stock? It's an interesting juxtaposition ;-)

 

I like that Ingatestone layout - looking good.

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Network Rail vans with BR blue stock? It's an interesting juxtaposition ;-).

Uh huh. There is a learning curve involved for many of us, when straying out of ones own comfort zone. It’s all part of the fun...

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