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On 15/02/2020 at 16:53, bécasse said:

Exhibiting British-based layouts in continental Europe and continental-based layouts in the UK may well become all but impossible from next January. Unless the UK and the EU remain in a Custom's Union, which given the recorded thoughts of chairman Cummings seems very unlikely, each layout will need a carnet de passage des Douanes, effectively an insurance policy that says that if you don't return the layout to its home base the insurance company will pay all the import duties which become due. The carnets don't come cheap.

 

Very good point.

 

Which raises the question of valuations! Valuing layouts for insurance seems a vexed enough question - how on earth would you go about valuing it for customs?!

 

I guess hand luggage sized layouts give another advantage of being unlikely to be questioned, whereas a van-full of layout is a different question.

 

J

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23 hours ago, justin1985 said:

 

Very good point.

 

Which raises the question of valuations! Valuing layouts for insurance seems a vexed enough question - how on earth would you go about valuing it for customs?!

 

I guess hand luggage sized layouts give another advantage of being unlikely to be questioned, whereas a van-full of layout is a different question.

I worked for Sealink car ferries in the early 1970s before the UK joined what was then the EC and I certainly remember carnets de passage, but in those days nobody took layouts to overseas shows so it was only the likes of musicians that needed them (for their instruments). Even then carnets were frighteningly expensive.

A friend who is a renowned specialist musician (of mediaeval music and instruments) has been trying to get quotes for the potential (and probable) new situation and it seems that somewhere around £ 1000 may be the starting point even if some mainstream insurers come back into the market. I was talking to a Dutch acquaintance yesterday who has regularly exhibited in the UK in the past, and he said that even visiting the UK will be too much hassle in the future, let alone bringing a layout - many Europeans don't possess passports (I don't) because they travel everywhere in Europe on their ID cards, but the UK has said that it will refuse to accept ID cards from 2021 on the rather spurious basis that they are less secure than passports.

Edited by bécasse

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Maybe it's better to just wait and see what happens. It could be wise not to book your layout to a 2021 overseas show until everything is clear.

I'm glad I can still bring the little layout I'm working on to the DJLC in June!

 

Jan

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On 23/02/2020 at 10:49, justin1985 said:

 

Very good point.

 

Which raises the question of valuations! Valuing layouts for insurance seems a vexed enough question - how on earth would you go about valuing it for customs?!

 

I guess hand luggage sized layouts give another advantage of being unlikely to be questioned, whereas a van-full of layout is a different question.

 

J

 

The value for insurance purposes and the value for customs will almost certainly be entirely different figures, if people are sensible about it.

Coming back from Dortmund Intermodellbau back in 1998, the van containing Copenhagen Fields was stopped at Dover Customs but when Tim opened the van up, the customs officer took one look and obviously thought better of checking any further.

One interpretation of the government guidance is that carnets are required for commercial purposes. It's possible that layouts and associated items may not require one.

Having travelled with "The Pizza" as hand luggage, the only interest from officialdom has been for security purposes.  A mini-exhibition was staged for the TSA agents at Boston Logan last time I flew with it.

 

I've also had to use carnets professionally and as long as someone else picks up the cost (i.e. my employer in my case), it's reasonably straightforward, just a bit delaying as you have to use the red channel to clear customs.

It would be a great pity if leaving the EU removes a nice interchange of layouts at model railway shows.  Yet one more foot we've shot ourselves in.

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19 hours ago, bécasse said:

 he said that even visiting the UK will be too much hassle in the future, let alone bringing a layout - many Europeans don't possess passports (I don't) because they travel everywhere in Europe on their ID cards, but the UK has said that it will refuse to accept ID cards from 2021 on the rather spurious basis that they are less secure than passports.

 

So that's how the hospitality industry will be able to cope with fewer foreign workers. Fewer guests to look after. Well done HM Govt!

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But surely none of you sophisticated Europeans will want to come to the UK? Now that it is in the dark ages with no electricity, no au pairs, no foie gras, no Lithuanian strawberry pickers? A veritable cultural backwater. Nice job (try) Messrs Barnier er al...

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11 hours ago, Yorkshire Square said:

But surely none of you sophisticated Europeans will want to come to the UK? Now that it is in the dark ages with no electricity, no au pairs, no foie gras, no Lithuanian strawberry pickers? A veritable cultural backwater. Nice job (try) Messrs Barnier er al...

 

Oh, you'll be fine. Why would you be interested in foreign layouts any more than you are in foreign workers? Those 8m economically inactive persons can also be gainly used in creating more home grown layouts. Presuming that isn't what they are already doing with their time.

 

Presumably you will still be allowed to model continental prototypes...

 

Chris

Edited by Chris Higgs
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Well, thanks for all the post Brexit doom and gloom. Maybe we should just wait and see what comes about?

 

In the meantime, I would be grateful if we could keep this thread 'on topic', namely my 2mm finescale layout.

 

Cheers,

David

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That looks absolutely superb David :yes:

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Great stuff David - your work is so wonderfully neat.

 

Cheers,

Steve

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Posted (edited)
On 15/03/2020 at 19:07, Pixie said:

Great stuff David - your work is so wonderfully neat.

 

Cheers,

Steve

 

Thanks for the compliment. :blush:

 

David

Edited by Kylestrome
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Posted (edited)

The harbour at Kylestrome would look rather empty without some form of maritime vessel, so what better than a traditional wooden fishing boat or two?

 

P4190133.jpg.324082e796f9b978adabc77a5d1d1477.jpg

 

I had already built one, using the Artitec resin kit (also available from Langley Models, I believe), which I think came out reasonably well. As it comes it is very much a continental design, presumably based on a Dutch prototype, but with some new masts and rigging it can be made to represent a typical British boat. The stern is somewhat different in form but I’m willing to live that in order to achieve a quick and relatively easy result.

 

P4190138.jpg.cbc5e3e9585031301c20296c69da4e65.jpg

 

Having bought a second kit, I thought it would be a good idea to make some changes to it to make it look different to “Lilly Ann”. It will be based on this photo that I found on the Internet:

https://fishingnews.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/WATN-1-Border-Lassie-cropped.jpg

 

P4230317.jpg.1dd76893cbd59ea2e1185bed738ab76a.jpg

 

I have shortened the cabin by sawing out a section behind the door, and I have removed the ‘hood’ shaped item in the bows. I have also made a start with painting it, in the typical varnished wood style which would still have been seen in the late sixties (Kylestrome is set in 1968/9).

 

More maritime modelling to follow.

 

David

Edited by Kylestrome
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Very nice.

 

I can recommend the Clyde Puffer from Gramodels for something properly Scottish. Makes up nicely, with a few tweaks.

 

Lyra_on_Loch_Tat.jpg.a4f11feed7c16b47ecd3853302ca455f.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Do they do models of Para Handy and Sunny Jim to go with it? You wouldn't need one of McPhail as he was always down in the engine room! 

 

Jim (in sunny Biggar) 

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1 hour ago, Caley Jim said:

Do they do models of Para Handy and Sunny Jim to go with it? You wouldn't need one of McPhail as he was always down in the engine room!

 

I did suggest it to the ModelU guy, but no response yet.

 

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On 24/04/2020 at 16:26, Caley Jim said:

Do they do models of Para Handy and Sunny Jim to go with it? You wouldn't need one of McPhail as he was always down in the engine room! 

 

Jim (in sunny Biggar) 

 

22 hours ago, Ian Morgan said:

 

I did suggest it to the ModelU guy, but no response yet.

 

Plus one for that idea (4mm for me though).:yes:

 

Nice work on your vessels David and Ian. I'm modifying a Peedie Models "Puffer" as "Auld Reekie" for Crinan just now.

 

Martyn.

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Scalescenes have one of those listed.  I don't think it includes any figures mind.

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Posted (edited)

Have you ever watched an old western where one character says to another “it’s quite out there”, and the other one says ”too quite!”. That’s usually the cue for the war-painted indians to line up on the brow of the nearest hill. I’ve had many modelling moments that run to a similar script. Just when things are going well, and you’re really enjoying it, you discover you’ve assembled something back-to-front and upside down.

 

Well so far, with this project, that hasn’t happened and I’m feeling unjustifiably chuffed with it. Cue: fishing boat expert, stage left, who will point out to me my ‘obvious’ errors. Until then, I’m having lots of fun putting this together.

 

DSC03888.jpg.7c07aa8f142446f5a3776c98ae13ce9f.jpg

Some extra hatch details in styrene.

 

DSC03889.jpg.3aed8bb2b53fd7608fcd39d032ee732e.jpg

Masts and sundry bits are cut from brass tube so that other fixings and details can be readily inserted. 'Eyelets' are twisted 10 amp fuse wire. The fittings for the mast stays were adapted from the kit etchings.

 

P4260323.jpg.03c8cc77a3ad083ed955a6c6aa7826be.jpg

 

On with the rigging!

 

David

Edited by Kylestrome
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Silver-Dollar-1.jpg.30e213bd30388e52dafb3d03b3f3ba7a.jpg


I’ve now completed the rigging, using elastic polymer thread fixed in place with cyano glue. The boat’s registration numbers and name were printed on glossy photo paper which was then sanded down extremely thin and glued in place.

 

Silver-Dollar-2.jpg.cabe86e587c65fd97c17a8a32744b525.jpg

The name “Silver Dollar” is a tribute to the film “Local Hero” and this scene in particular:

https://youtu.be/yWIiRimsXBo

 

All the general ‘clutter’ of a working boat still remains to be detailed.

 

David

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