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Annie's Virtual Pre-Grouping, Grouping and BR Layouts & Workbench


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I decided that the Foden loco with the long canopy roof would be the new engine assigned  to the small sub shed at Elgar Wood.  Once I have the Foden properly fettled I'll start to add some extra details like lamps and handrails.  The Foden is going to be No. 09 and it will be getting a proper numberplate.  The water tank will more than likely be lettered for the Hopewood Tramway and I'll have to do something about a set of footsteps on that side of the engine as well.  The other side has all the big gears and drive chain so I won't be putting any footsteps there, though perhaps I'll put a shunter's step at the front of the locomotive.

No.09 has been getting test driven a lot while I've been working on setting up its brakes.  It does sound wonderfully agricultural and I'm glad I persisted with what seemed like a mad idea to put together a suitable sound file.  I was surprised to discover that it's easier to drive No.09 on the steam controls instead of the DCC controls.  Though just as I was starting to have fun No.09 got the sulks and refused to move, - so plainly I still need to do a few fine adjustments to the engine specs.

 

nYDRk1q.jpg

 

vw0NKKj.jpg

Edited by Annie
can't spell for toffee
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52 minutes ago, NeilHB said:

I do love those Foden locomotives Annie - they are really quite delightful and funky! 

They're an awful lot of fun Neil.  Similar kinds of home built geared engines used to lurk about on the timber tramways here in New Zealand during the 1900s-1920s.

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After some small adjustments the Foden is running better under the steam controls.  The sound files are working better too and the amount of coal and water the loco is using is much more realistic.  All of this adds up to a small and quirky engine that's a whole lot more fun to drive.

 

 

0f2gFuO.jpg

Edited by Annie
added a picture
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Further testing under the steam controls.  The sound files are a bit quiet so I'll have to see if I can adjust them.  The Foden is running a bit better, but I'm going to have to do some more tinkering with the blower settings since they aren't huffing and puffing at the fire very well and the boiler pressure drops if the loco sits still for too long.  At least the injectors are working properly now.

 

 

 

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Back again!  N3V released a SP4 'update' for TRS19 which utterly trashed everything, but with me being obsessive  about backing up my digital work for Trainz as well as my Trainz installs on my computer I was able to restore it all back to how it was again.  It was a lot of work though and the whole time I was worried that I was going to lose some of the work I'd done.

Fortunately I had backed up everything for the Foden geared locomotives including the latest version of the sound files.  I was eventually able to find documentation on how to set up a sound file for steam engines in Trainz, though with the Fodens being single cylindered locos it was a little different to the usual kind of thing.  The present sound file stops working at about 9 mph, but now that I know that what I've done so far is reasonably alright I can go ahead and sort out the sound files for higher speeds (15 mph Wow!).

 

 

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On 16/10/2021 at 00:14, Regularity said:

He’s popped along the footplate to wind up the spring…

 

As far as I can make out from other photos, the rear of the driving wheel splasher above the frames was a solid panel, so presumably it was possible to walk round to oil the motion while travelling, squeezing between the boiler and splasher?

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On 15/10/2021 at 23:15, Annie said:

Broad Gauge cheer up picture:  An unusual photo of an unidentified Convertible 3021 class 2-2-2  built in 1891.

'Oiling round' was a standard feature of 19th century operations and, for example, was mentioned as a contributory factor in the BoT report on the 1913 accident at Ais Gill on the Settle & Carlisle line.   By then, the procedure was probably unnecessary but continued as a routine practice'.

 

Broad Gauge (BG) engines had the advantage of greater foot[plate width and (except for convertibles) many had an outside hand rail.  I often think that a BG footplate is more like the deck of a ship, with its rail around the edge.

Edited by MikeOxon
typo - 'Bread' gauge (loaves to go with the fishplates?)
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I think I've got the Foden properly sorted now so I'm going to call it done and dusted and it can can become officially assigned to the sub shed at Elgar Wood.

 

 

At Hopewood on Sea after a successful test run down from Elgar Wood.

 

WS7znHA.jpg

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19th century locomotive cheer up picture:  Shrewsbury & Hereford Railway 2-2-2 of 1854 by Vulcan Foundry.

I made the tender for one of these locomotives back in my intrepid P4 days, but never got very far with the locomotive as I'd seriously taken on a model that was outside my capabilities at the time.  In 4mm scale it would have been a tiny little thing and a major piece of watchmaking.  The tender turned out very nicely though and I was quite proud of it.  Unfortunately it got lost when too much life happened (sigh).

 

kiocZxS.jpg

 

uLzjjd8.jpg

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Nice drawing.  Is it yours? The numbers are maker's numbers.  Later re-numbered to 215-20 when with GWR

 

According to Ahrons, one of these engines could still be seen "lying in a heap of scrap behind Swindon Works in 1886".

Edited by MikeOxon
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43 minutes ago, Northroader said:

That’s a very brave deed to contemplate tackling that valve gear, Me? I’d run a mile in the opposite direction.

In my defence I have to confess that I didn't realise what I was about to attempt.

 

35 minutes ago, MikeOxon said:

Nice drawing.  Is it yours? The numbers are maker's numbers.  Later re-numbered to 215-20 when with GWR

 

According to Ahrons, one of these engines could still be seen "lying in a heap of scrap behind Swindon Works in 1886".

The drawing is a tracing from the Vulcan Foundry archives.  I had to smile when I saw it as I would have been in my early 30 somethings when I last laid eyes on a copy of this drawing.

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1 hour ago, MikeOxon said:

Your photos also jogged my own memory.  I started a thread on GWR Absorbed Engines back in 2014.  This engine, plus several other oddities, was mentioned, with some discussion of the outside valve gear, in the various posts.

 

Seeing this Geelong & Melbourne Railway Co. engine  in your old thread Mike suddenly reminded me that around two years ago I was given two digital models of G&MRCo engines, - No.34 and No.42, - in post 1860 condition.  Their maker had responded to a query I'd made on the Trainz forum about setting up engine specs for single driver engines and very kindly gave me a pair of his (at the time) WIP engines he'd made for an early Victorian Railways project as well as three engine spec files for mid 19th century engines..

Titania Side View HO Scale Whit Background.jpg

 

This is No.34, - it's either 'Oberon' or 'Titania', - I'm not sure which.  I wish my own WIP efforts looked as good as this.

 

2n9AtEr.jpg

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2 hours ago, Northroader said:

That’s a very brave deed to contemplate tackling that valve gear, Me? I’d run a mile in the opposite direction.

Gooch, if I'm not mistaken.  Been there, done that.

DSCN0292.JPG.cbc82797d1a7385fe8aca8267f7e6607.JPG

 

Jim

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3 hours ago, Compound2632 said:

 

If it looks impossibly fiddly to make you can guarantee that someone's done it in 2 mm finescale!

Difficult we do every day.  The impossible takes a wee bit longer!  :D

 

Jim

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