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Passing contact switches

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I have traditionally used miniature toggle switches but recent experience makes me wonder if it

might be better to use the 'Hornby' type switches. I know they are much more expensive but on

the basis that you get what you pay for, are they so much better??

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Better to go for the PECO passing contact switch rather than the Hornby, especially if using a CDU.

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The previous reply has assumed you want them for switching solenoid point motors, but you did not actually say. This is what they are designed for.

What problem did you have with the miniature toggle switches?

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The previous reply has assumed you want them for switching solenoid point motors, but you did not actually say. This is what they are designed for.

What problem did you have with the miniature toggle switches?

I assumed it after reading of his problems with using momentary contact switches to operate solenoid motors.

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/132487-baffledpoint-motor-electrics/

Edited by Free At Last

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The idea of changing switches resulted from responses to a different thread. I think some of my switches have been

damaged through re-use [probably poor soldering skills!]resulting, it seems, in one/some of them being permanently on. So

A fresh start with new switches seems a good idea. Thanks for your comments.

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After years of using mini toggles I decided to splash out on peco switches and housings recently, I've had no issues with them and the passing contact versions are great for point motors as you don't have to use a CDU with them if you don't want to.

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Having read your other thread, Hornby switches are not suited to CDUs.

CDUs take a short while between uses to recharge. Hornby passing contact switches will first discharge themselves across the coil which was selected, then have inadequate recharge time before passing over the contact for the new selection. You can get around this by pausing the switch in neutral but this would quickly become annoying.

I have used push buttons, which would have burned out quickly without a CDU.

 

Edited by Pete the Elaner

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Many thanks Pete, some useful information. One continues to live and learn [and enjoy]!!!!

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My preference is for on/on switches rather than passing contact with a separate press button to energise.

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The OP mentions "miniature" toggle switches in his first post and later that some of his switches are permanently ON. This suggests that the switches were under-rated in the first place and not capable of handling the several Amps current involved using solenoid motors. Switches without robust internal contacts and adequate separation gaps will fail exactly like mentioned as contacts get welded together.

 

Richard

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The OP mentions "miniature" toggle switches in his first post and later that some of his switches are permanently ON. This suggests that the switches were under-rated in the first place and not capable of handling the several Amps current involved using solenoid motors. Switches without robust internal contacts and adequate separation gaps will fail exactly like mentioned as contacts get welded together.

 

Richard

"Miniature" (and "subminiature", "ultra subminiature" etc) are specific terms when it comes to switches etc. And "miniature" is the largest that is commonly found. A quick check suggests most are rated for at least 3A.

 

It seems more likely the OP has the wrong variety of switch, as discussed above.

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