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Hot water will help, but not too hot depending on the grade of whitemetal used in the kit, if you use water too hot it may start to melt! Acetone will also soften it.

 

HTH

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Hi All

Can any one tell me how I can dismantle a white metal loco that has been built using epoxy resin?

Thanks Bob

 

 

Nitromos paint stripper will do most of the work, you can then boil it if you want the W/M will not melt in boiling water, unless you can get the water to above 133deg. OK dont use a pressure cooker.

 

ATB

 

OzzyO.

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Nitromos paint stripper will do most of the work, you can then boil it if you want the W/M will not melt in boiling water, unless you can get the water to above 133deg. OK dont use a pressure cooker.

 

ATB

 

OzzyO.

 

 

I second this, I use Nitromores all the time to dismantle old kits. Sometimes I have to revert to boiling water in an old saucepan, don't let the metal touch the bottom. Larger bits need to be held in the water longer as it takes them longer to heat up (and cool down) than smaller bits.

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  • RMweb Gold

Although I haven't done this for a long time, I have dismantled whitemetal kits by putting them in a pan of boiling water. It often helped if I had removed the paint in Nitromors first.

 

But.... don't try it all in one go by boiling the Nitromors!!! :O ;)

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Although I haven't done this for a long time, I have dismantled whitemetal kits by putting them in a pan of boiling water. It often helped if I had removed the paint in Nitromors first.

 

But.... don't try it all in one go by boiling the Nitromors!!! ohmy.gif wink.gif

 

 

Captain Kernow,

I never thought about boiling the Nitromors,

God knows what that would do to your kitchen decor!!!!!!!!!!!

blink.gif Maybe I should have said dont do it AS IT WILL KILL YOUblink.gif .

 

ATB

OzzyO.

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Captain Kernow,

I never thought about boiling the Nitromors,

God knows what that would do to your kitchen decor!!!!!!!!!!!

 

ATB

OzzyO.

 

After the fumes of boiling nitromors have killed you...the state of the kitchen decor will be the very least of your worries........It is exceedingly noxious.........

 

To heat the metal safely in water, put a glass or china plate in the bottom of the pan, it will diffuse any excess heat. Most epoxy will give at about 105c, softening at 100c. Superglue gives at about 90c, and completely breaks down at 100c.

The white metal should not be effected by these temperatures at all, even the plate should in theory not be needed as the water absorbs the heat from the hot base, but better safe than sorry,

 

Stephen.

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After the fumes of boiling nitromors have killed you...the state of the kitchen decor will be the very least of your worries........It is exceedingly noxious.........

 

To heat the metal safely in water, put a glass or china plate in the bottom of the pan, it will diffuse any excess heat. Most epoxy will give at about 105c, softening at 100c. Superglue gives at about 90c, and completely breaks down at 100c.

The white metal should not be effected by these temperatures at all, even the plate should in theory not be needed as the water absorbs the heat from the hot base, but better safe than sorry,

 

Stephen.

 

 

Please see the amendment to the message above as of some urgency.

 

ATB

OzzyO.

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Er,.......... my comment is I hope correct, do not even warm Nitromors it fumes an irritant gas.

It is quite safe to boil the locomotive though....the glue will break.

Also it is possible to freeze the whole thing and the joints will break, but this is a last resort, and some resins are too rubbery for it too work.

 

Stephen.

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Er,.......... my comment is I hope correct, do not even warm Nitromors it fumes an irritant gas.

It is quite safe to boil the locomotive though....the glue will break.

Also it is possible to freeze the whole thing and the joints will break, but this is a last resort, and some resins are too rubbery for it too work.

 

Stephen.

 

 

OK,

Please see amendment to message No 9. Boiling Nitrmose is NOT GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH OR YOUR HOUSE.

 

That is what I meant.

 

OzzyO.

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Just soak it in cellulose thinners for a couple of days. Ive dismantled a number of kits this way. It will also remove any paint as well. A lot less dangerous than using nitromors hot or cold. :)

 

Tony

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I use as an alternative to placing model in a pan of boiling water, is to place model in a tray/container and pour boiling water over the model straight from the "just boiled" kettle.

 

Pete

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I believe heat will only work with wimpy '5 minute epoxies'. Heat is used to cure the real stuff.

 

Don't use heat with any paint stripping solvents - they are inflammable, corrosive or give off noxious fumes, or any combination of these.

 

I used hot caustic soda to strip a Dublo 'Castle' once. It worked, but don't follow my example! I got away with it, you might not - caustic soda is very corrosive especially hot. (Soap is made by dissolving sheep fat in boiling soda.)

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Hi,Not too sure but I think I dissolved a white metal casting using Nitromoors,left in overnight.Also wear rubber gloves when handling,(not marigolds as they will dissolve) but the industrial red gloves.MickD.

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Do you really mean the metal casting?....Nitromors will not attack white metal, it may attack Mazak, (toy metal), and will attack resins etc.,

On older Dublo bodies for instance Nitromors is safe , but do no let it dry on, and do not leave in contact too long.

 

Most kits are made from white metal which is lead tin alloy, or lead free pewter, which is tin zinc alloy.

 

Stephen.

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Hi,

I was facing a kit built W/M loco with a wonky boiler and so I put it in a fast food plastic tray with lid and added about 5mm of nail varnish remover (cheap stuff from Lidl) and put it in the shed, within 2 days the epoxy was rubbery and peeled/scraped off easily. Hope this may be of some use.

Liddy

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Do you really mean the metal casting?....Nitromors will not attack white metal, it may attack Mazak, (toy metal), and will attack resins etc.,

On older Dublo bodies for instance Nitromors is safe , but do no let it dry on, and do not leave in contact too long.

 

Most kits are made from white metal which is lead tin alloy, or lead free pewter, which is tin zinc alloy.

 

Stephen.

 

My recently acquired, latest Dublo Duchess has survived several coverings of paint stripper. (Homebase not Nitromors but basically the same stuff.) Her paint was in a dreadful state due to neglect and my trial of acrylic BR blue (Reeves artist colour) didn't help! Some still lurks in the crevices (Dublo paint is very resistant!), but it's surprising how much detail is hidden by the paint (Dublo paint is also quite thick - the same applies to Dinky Toys).

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Thanks again to all those that answered this post. In the end I decided to try Cellulose thinners, for two reasons 1: I had some 2: it is safer to use than Nitromoors. 48 hours in a can of thinners and the loco came apart easily. The strange thing was some of the glue went soft and rubbery, and some went brittle and snapped apart. I can only think the original builder used glue from two different suppliers.

 

Bob biggrin.gif

 

 

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