Jump to content

Quarryscapes

FR Van 116 in 16mm - a modified One12 Models kit

Recommended Posts

Those of you who've read my 16mm Scale loco construction threads will know that I like to include as much detail as I can in 16mm scale, and like to get the construction as close to prototype as I can. I was very happy to hear about One12 models' selection of FR wagons that seem to share those aims - so I bought the Van 99 kit. Just like with the locos, this will go off piste quite quickly where necessary to improve the model. 

 

Van 99 was actually built as number 116, so there's the first deviation before even beginning. New numberlates will be needed. It has proven very difficult to find photos of the prototype. A few years back I must have spend a good half hour stood next to it photographing Princess being polished, but took not one picture where the van was the subject!

 

The instructions are available on the website - so we'll start at the beginning, or rather point 8 in the instructions as I'd prefer to get the underframe done first. First thing is first, identify the bits of timber. The first thing I notice is that the cuts are not square, most of them are trapezoidal in section which means that some opening up of the slots is necessary in order for everything to slot together neatly, which is how I start off. I haven't added any of the details, they are better off fitted afterwards in my opinion which will allow sanding of the timbers without having to work around bits of detail. I decided to mark each join by number and labelled each timber, so that each piece was filed to fit a specific place. The middle rail and outer crossmembers were glued together first ensuring that they are square. Once set the other pieces were filed so that they were a snug but drop in fit. 

 

post-21854-0-33696100-1525546851_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-30611200-1525547091_thumb.jpg

 

Then the headstocks are dry fitted. At this point it became obvious that the slots in the side rails were all 1mm too far along the rail, which was easily corrected by filing until the rails dropped between the headstocks without a gap and didn't project out width ways either. 

 

post-21854-0-60969900-1525547081_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-53815500-1525547109_thumb.jpg

 

Now that has all been glued, I have turned my attention to fitting the hardware. The axleboxes and brake shaft trunnions are nicely machined brass. The axleboxes I have opted to screw on using countersunk M1 screws as per the prototype, the same goes for the inner brake trunnion. The outer however will be secured by 1.3mm headed rivets passed through the frame and soldered to the brass trunnion inside the frame. I have redrilled the holes accordingly - the kit enviasges a c==single central fixing outside, wheres the prototype used two bolts set diagonally. 

 

post-21854-0-60909700-1525547135_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-62108400-1525547172_thumb.jpg

 

And that's as far as I've got! See you next time!

 

 

 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely wheels, without the usual over-scale rims. Are they lost-wax castings?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely wheels, without the usual over-scale rims. Are they lost-wax castings?

 

CNC machined, they are works of art! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CNC machined, they are works of art!

 

 

Thanks. They are indeed works of art.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today has been spent on the patio building an oak frame which will keep the ply sides in check - yes, this is the subject of my thread on straightening wibbly wobbly thin plywood. Every panel of it is warped to some extent, which is not necessarily a bad thing as it gives a bit of character to the finished model, but in this case the body is just a 4 sided box with a roof, there's nothing to keep it straight whilst it's being constructed. 

 

So I cobbled up some crude frames from some spare oak strips - 6x12mm so nice and sturdy! The first one I glued the strips bit by bit to the side, which was a mistake - the second I have built the frame off model on a sheet of glass and will apply the plywood to it as a skin. The one built up piecemeal is seen here in a clamp which is pulling the side straight whilst the glue sets. 

 

Otherwise, I have formed the corner pieces and re-drilled the sides to take the rivets that mate them, I have filled up the holes from the number plates (After doing some net research I came to the conclusion those supplied were too long and the hole spacing on the replacement wouldn't match) and added the floor to the underframe and drilled through the bolt holes for the axleboxes and drawgear.

 

post-21854-0-55531400-1525704458_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-29670500-1525704526_thumb.jpg

 

 

The latter highlighted an error in the model - in Festiniog wagon building practice, the headstock and rails are joined dovetail fashion, but the joints are staggered so that the headstock sits above the sides by an amount equal to the floor planking. The lowest plank of the body sides is thus deeper than the lowest plank of the end in order to cover the ends of the floor planks. The model assumes a flat floor. There's not a lot I can do about this, since the holes in the strapping for the rivets are already positioned. I am thinking about maybe adding an extra slice of wood to headstocks to raise them slightly and maybe filing away the headstocks between the longitudinal beams of the underframe correspondingly. 

 

I have also been looking into the replacement bits I need. I have decided to do away with the brake gear as supplied, there's nothing much wrong with it but the 3D printed plastic feels a bit vulnerable to me, so I am to replace it in Bronze castings which I even hope to incorporate a working ratchet mechanism. I will also do a proper buffer, which has been omitted from the kit, and replace the drawgear with functional bars and springs. I have ordered a Slaters centre buffer to use the ram and spring, and will have a printed body of correct pattern to match. 

 

post-21854-0-72533400-1525704422_thumb.png

 

post-21854-0-66929300-1525704442_thumb.png

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided I couldn't live knowing the ends were wrong, so I'm modifying them! 

 

First thing, plug the bottom rivet hole in the strapping with a soldered in rivet which is then filed down flush. Then a new hole is marked and drilled. Then a strip of 1.5mm wood is added to the floor, and a corresponding chunk taken out of the bottom of the end and straps.

 

post-21854-0-73732700-1526121944_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-90890800-1526122100_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-51238200-1526132922_thumb.jpg

Edited by Quarryscapes
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I screwed up on the other end and managed to cut the bottom off not only too much but also not square! Thankfully there is a solution: Iron-on Oak veneer edge strips. I had a massive roll left over from building my bookshelf (oak faced MDF, hence the need for an oak edging strip). A strip on the bottom of the end and a strip on top of the headstock and sand back down to correct level. 

 

I've also removed some material from under the headstock, leaving a raised patch at the end of each longitudinal beam, to complete the offset headstock appearance. You can really see the difference it makes in the appearance of the ends

 

 

post-21854-0-77876900-1526147899_thumb.jpg

post-21854-0-42331000-1526147912_thumb.jpg

post-21854-0-19651300-1526147923_thumb.jpg

post-21854-0-65720700-1526147970_thumb.jpg

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well this has quickly spiralled into an expensive project! 
 

Since the last instalment I've managed to assemble the sides and ends into a box using the brass corner plates bolted in place to keep it all together whilst the wood glue dried, the brass was then removed, cleaned and chemically blackened. The running gear was also blackened, and whilst it was off, I took the chance the build up the trapezoidal frame with filler and sand it back down flat so that the axleboxes are now actually parallel and the wheels can turn freely when all bolted into place. 

 

I managed to snap several of the 3D printed axlebox covers, so ended up designing and ordering new ones. 

 

Now I've turned my attention to the door side. This needs some work. As supplied the door is a single piece of 1.5mm glued to the side. Well that's no good! The real thing is not that thin,and has to clear the strapping (which isn't included in the kit) so is not that close to the body. I laminated the door with the discarded false roof and trimmed down to size, bringing it up to 3mm thickness. Then I mocked it all up in Fusion 360 to see what changes needed to be made to the mounting hardware. The result being that it all needs replacing. So that's not a single piece of the supplied 3D printed parts going into the model! 

 

My new parts include supports for the door runner, new hangers for the top of the door, new hangers for the body holding the top rail (replacing etched stanchions), New corner brackets with runner rollers integral and most importanly a hasp and staple lock mechanism which is quite prominent in pics but not supplied at all in the kit. 

 

post-21854-0-35211000-1526741522_thumb.png

 

post-21854-0-15454100-1526742428_thumb.png

 

Lastly, I'd designed a printed one piece roof with cornice mouldings and gutter strips which replace the supplied parts that need fabricating and trimming. Total cost of the van is now getting close to £200! 

 

 

Edited by Quarryscapes
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the brake side hardware has all arrived, and it looks good! The door side has now been ordered too. 

 

post-21854-0-26464000-1527408786_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-03799700-1527411471_thumb.jpg

Edited by Quarryscapes
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suppose the next step is logically to make the brakes work... I've ordered the push rods in WSF to try them out, it could get expensive if I have to have each part in brass or bronze!

 

post-21854-0-49979800-1527521618_thumb.png

 

Meanwhile on the bench, I've drilled the headstocks to accommodate the buffers

 

post-21854-0-32847200-1527521934_thumb.jpg

 

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is some progress to report! Brake gear has finally been ordered, and there is paint on the wood! I have spent today deciding on a colour. Not one of my various maroons, crimsons, indian reds, brick reds or red oxides was what I wanted - the end result being a combination of a basecoat of Phoenix BR Faded Crimson and a final light topcoat of Light Rust. This gives a lovely shade of reddish brown that is similar in tone to Phoenix brick red but the shade is a lot less cherry and much more brown, and is about what the modern day quarrymen's carriages are painted. It is finished in Gloss varnish and is seen here on the door as it shapes up with the black 3D printed hardware being added. 

 

post-21854-0-70003000-1529176039_thumb.jpg

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is progress going on slowly! Not a great shot, but you can see the underframe has received some black paint. Off camera the corner straps have been fabricated for the underframe and have been blacked. The strapping for the body has been cut to size and blacked. The brake gear has been blacked. Bolt holes for the buffer have been drilled and the buffers have received spacers to bring the heads in to correct depth. The door is temporarily attached, the new rail hangers were test fitted and I snapped one, so a replacement is on order. It won't be long now before the roof is here and can be test fitted along with the rest of the brake gear. I've even painted the number plates!

 

post-21854-0-83586700-1529856824_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-25896600-1529857474_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-06599000-1529857497_thumb.jpg

Edited by Quarryscapes
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More progress! The brake gear has started being assembled, though I managed to lose the crank and pushrod, ending up in the bin along with the piece of kitchen roll they were drying on! 

 

post-21854-0-51354800-1530899408_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-22108800-1530899419_thumb.jpg

 

So far so good, my measuring was somehow accurate and the system works! 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bit more progress on the door. I was somewhat concerned that my new door hardware would be vulnerable if the door was to take a knock as there is a gap of 1.5mm behind it, so I designed a spacer. It is screwed to the body and the door can be glued to it. 

 

post-21854-0-89183000-1532882124_thumb.jpg

 

post-21854-0-59893800-1532882132_thumb.jpg

 

Looks a lot better than the 1.5mm plywood door glued direct to the body don't you think?

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Alan,

Did you complete the van?  I'd been looking for 0n12 models, but they seem to have ceased, were the wheels slaters that you used, or were they part of the key?

 

Rich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It hasn't been completed yet, but it's nearly there!

 

The wheels are supplied in the kit, they are CNC milled brass on steel axles. I must get on and finish it actually. It just needs a few of the 3D printed details tweaking and replacing as I broke a few of them. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have decided to get a move on and do something with this, so I have literally brushed the dust off it and made a new start. The strapping is all now attached to the body, and I am just in the process of attaching some cross pieces inside the body to take Tee-nuts that will be used to secure it to the chassis. I decided not to glue it, because it's a lot easier to assemble the brake mechanism if I can get easy access inside the body. I also need to take the axleboxes off and add some washers to take out the excessive sideplay. Not sure why it even has any, it's only got 4 wheels! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some work done...

 

BFI-XT2A9820.jpg.254a04c70c2855101afede27cbba7b2b.jpgBFI-XT2A9821.jpg.057452a5a9e33d9ba2600ef3f40b29ce.jpg

 

Roof attached with countersunk screws...I thought it would be a simple matter to filler over them, oh no! My Squadron Green had gone too hard to get out of the tube so I opted for some cellulose stuff. I don't like using it because the solvent in it eats polystyrene, but I thought since this is Nylon it should be fine - except it ate the high build primer on the roof instead and left a right mess, which has taken all day to fill back up with more high build and lots (and I mean lots!) of sanding. It's still not perfect so more tomorrow.

 

Then there is the brake gear. I've very carefully cross drilled through the crank and cross shaft so they can be separated, since the shaft is going to have to be glued into the brake handle.

 

BFI-XT2A9819.jpg.fbb07f6cacf972afa0ef0fa126294835.jpg

 

I couldn't get the axleboxes off again, some idiot has already glued the 3D printed covers on them. Guess I'll have to live with the side play and the occasional collision twixt wheel and brake block. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.