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I eventually made a start a couple of days ago, and now have the main frames assembled:

post-14390-0-12734100-1529006166_thumb.jpg

As I threatened to do, I've been filming most of the proceedings on a webcam. Once I've edited the footage into something slightly less mind-numbing and added a voice over explaining what I'm doing, I'll post the first installment...

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Here's the first video. Ironically, it features not my modelling, but a detailed inspection of one of Nigel's completed Jubilee chassis.

I thought it would be useful to start off knowing what the end product should be like!

 

https://youtu.be/nh8Inq15jSw

 

But never mind the chassis - I can't stop drooling over the weathered finish Nigel's achieved on 45601 - ingrained soot polished to a lovely dark shine... really impressive.

Edited by Nick Mitchell
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Here's Part 2. I'm actually doing something now - although it is mainly pontificating!

 

I realise that there are many different ways of approaching building a loco chassis. In these videos I will attempt to demonstrate and explain in detail my own current way of doing things. I make no claim that this is the best way, but so far it has worked for me.

 

https://youtu.be/NXajG5uOe30

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Brilliant stuff Nick, these videos will hopefully take some of the mystery out of chassis building and using one of Nigel's excellent kits is perfect. Despite being an old hand at building 2mm chassis Ive already picked up on the abrasive blocks you use. I normally use a fibreglass pen which does the job well but, like you, I'm not a fan of all those little bits and will certainly be visiting Eileens next time I see them.

Looking forward to more tips I can pinch!

 

Jerry

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Brilliant stuff Nick, these videos will hopefully take some of the mystery out of chassis building and using one of Nigel's excellent kits is perfect. Despite being an old hand at building 2mm chassis Ive already picked up on the abrasive blocks you use. I normally use a fibreglass pen which does the job well but, like you, I'm not a fan of all those little bits and will certainly be visiting Eileens next time I see them.

Looking forward to more tips I can pinch!

 

Jerry

Thanks for the encouragement Jerry, and keep a careful look out for the tips I've pinched from you!

 

No technique you'll see is my own invention. I was lucky to have been "brought up" in the Darkest Essex Area Group in the mid 2000s, where there were several very accomplished (and incredibly generous) modellers on hand to show me how to do things. Since that time I've continued to absorb and adapt other people's ideas to my own style. If I were to attempt to name those who have helped or influenced me, it would be quite a long list.

 

Nick.

 

P.S. When you get to Eileen's, bear in mind the price label on the Garryflex block in the video is a decade old!

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Here's Part 2. I'm actually doing something now - although it is mainly pontificating!

 

I realise that there are many different ways of approaching building a loco chassis. In these videos I will attempt to demonstrate and explain in detail my own current way of doing things. I make no claim that this is the best way, but so far it has worked for me.

 

https://youtu.be/NXajG5uOe30

HI Nick,

 

I've only built one chassis and I consider you a master at locomotive building. It's really great that you are producing these videos so people like me from other countries can see how you do things and learn from you. Thank you very much

 

Steve

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Here's the first video. Ironically, it features not my modelling, but a detailed inspection of one of Nigel's completed Jubilee chassis.

I thought it would be useful to start off knowing what the end product should be like!

 

 

But never mind the chassis - I can't stop drooling over the weathered finish Nigel's achieved on 45601 - ingrained soot polished to a lovely dark shine... really impressive.

Hi Nick.

 

Brilliant stuff, these videos. Thanks for sparing your time to produce and post these episodes. I can't wait for the next one! 

 

I've no idea why I drilled so many holes in the underside of the Jubilee body. Maybe, like the man who took all his clothes off and jumped on a large cactus plant, it seemed like a good idea at the time. It looks like my approach to chassis construction is more pragmatic than neat, though the really ugly work seems to be hidden from view when everything is assembled.

 

Nig H

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HI Nick,

 

I've only built one chassis and I consider you a master at locomotive building. It's really great that you are producing these videos so people like me from other countries can see how you do things and learn from you. Thank you very much

 

Steve

Hi Steve,

It has taken me a very long time to reach this point, starting several locos and getting stuck in different places with each of them.

Only in the last couple of years does my loco building feel to have come together where I can contemplate starting a project like this with confidence that I will end up with a well-running chassis in a reasonable time frame.

If you've already built one chassis, you're well on the way. What's your second one going to be?

Nick.

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Here's my progress so far, on the Farish replacement etch.

 

Tender:

post-1489-0-06462300-1529266851_thumb.jpg

 

I made the PCB material for the cyclinders oversize and then filed to shape after soldering to the etch:

post-1489-0-35922500-1529266905.jpg

 

After reading the instructions from the Black 5 I decided to use 1.5 mm i/d tube to support the pistons, using the chassis and overlength tube as a jig and aid to getting everything square:

post-1489-0-53417200-1529267052_thumb.jpg

 

The right way up with motion bracket attached to PCB material:

post-1489-0-47390800-1529267172.jpg

 

I also realised that when I sold the original chassis I kept the bag of extras which include the valve ends, so I don't need to use the Black 5 castings.

 

Now to start on the hard bit. This will be my first outside motion.  :)

 

Andrew

 

 

 

 

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Hi Nick,

 

Thanks for doing these.

Whilst I've no intention of building a Jubilee I'm learning a lot from them.

I'm particularly looking forward to the lessons on outside cylinders and valve gear and seeing how the springing is arranged.

Nigel did show me at one of the 2mm roadshows but I still can't quite get it.

 

Are there any plans to add these videos to the 2mm Society website?

They are great resource and useful to current and future members, it would be a shame to lose them in the depths of the web.

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Hi Nick,

 

Thanks for doing these.

Whilst I've no intention of building a Jubilee I'm learning a lot from them.

I'm particularly looking forward to the lessons on outside cylinders and valve gear and seeing how the springing is arranged.

Nigel did show me at one of the 2mm roadshows but I still can't quite get it.

 

Are there any plans to add these videos to the 2mm Society website?

They are great resource and useful to current and future members, it would be a shame to lose them in the depths of the web.

 

If Nick is amenable to the idea, I'm sure it could be arranged somehow. Maybe when he's got a bit further into the build though.

 

Andy

 

PS> I made a start on my Jubilee chassis last Thursday evening at a 2mm area group meeting. I haven't got as far as Nick has (have removed the tender frames from the etch and opened out the axle holes for the bearings).

Edited by 2mm Andy
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Hi Nick,

 

Thanks for doing these.

Whilst I've no intention of building a Jubilee I'm learning a lot from them.

I'm particularly looking forward to the lessons on outside cylinders and valve gear and seeing how the springing is arranged.

Nigel did show me at one of the 2mm roadshows but I still can't quite get it.

 

Are there any plans to add these videos to the 2mm Society website?

They are great resource and useful to current and future members, it would be a shame to lose them in the depths of the web.

 

Hi Argos - Glad you're finding them useful. There's a way to go before I get to the valve gear... I hope you can hold out that long!

 

If Nick is amenable to the idea, I'm sure it could be arranged somehow. Maybe when he's got a bit further into the build though.

 

Andy

 

PS> I made a start on my Jubilee chassis last Thursday evening at a 2mm area group meeting. I haven't got as far as Nick has (have removed the tender frames from the etch and opened out the axle holes for the bearings).

 

Yes, I'm amenable. There are plenty of Association members who don't subscribe to RMWeb, and some of them may be insomniacs too.

The videos themselves are on YouTube, so they're not going anywhere. All you need is a list of links. When I've done a few more, I might go back and embed some links within them.

It may even be worth thinking about a DVD for the actual Jubilee... but let's not get carried away until the thing is built.

 

Anyway, in the meantime, here is the next thrilling instalment. A bit shorter this time, but the next one is likely to be feature length!

 

https://youtu.be/KY8GYLd0Wnc

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Great stuff again Nick. Love the dodge with the cocktail stick. I've always done it the other way round, holding the nut down and centering with the cocktail stick and simply running a tap through after to clear any excess solder but your way is much neater - another idea pinched.

 

Looking forward to the next installment.

 

Jerry

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 Love the dodge with the cocktail stick.

 

That's how I always do it, but I can't remember if I thought of it independently, or was shown at the (very useful) chassis workshop in Oxford a few years ago.

 

It's not 100% foolproof for me :(

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Great stuff Nick.  I'm starting to understand why your work always looks so neat!  I was interested to see how you ream out the axle bush holes.  I always use a piece of mdf with a hole in so that the chassis etch side is flat whilst opening out the holes, but gripping it in the vice allows a bit more torque and saves on blunting the broach/reamer with the wood.

 

Simon

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Great videos Nick. While I'm not contemplating 2mm fine scale yet, I can see these being of much use when I finally get around to designing an N gauge chassis!

 

Thank you for taking the time to video your build and explain everything.

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Nick - I would just like to further reinforce my appreciation of you taking the time to produce these videos.

I was thinking that there are many chassis build articles written in the traditional way in the 2mm magazine. Whilst they do have a use, I think that this type of video is a superior medium for sharing information and learning.

In your videos I can see exactly how you are performing each task and picking up on the important subtleties that are invariably skipped over in the practicality of a written article. 

It's like a personalised workshop for the masses and I'm sure many of us will have greater confidence and knowledge to tackle a complete build in the future as a result of your good work here.

I'm already building up a list of useful tools that I need to acquire as well, so you are contributing to UK exports and economic growth as well ! :-)

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Nick,

 

I'm enjoying the videos very much. I'm intrigued that you can work on the chassis and get such good video without the camera getting in the way. Could we please see a photo of your camera setup?

 

David

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I'm enjoying the videos very much. I'm intrigued that you can work on the chassis and get such good video without the camera getting in the way. Could we please see a photo of your camera setup?

 

Hi David,

Here's where the magic happens...

post-14390-0-99983700-1529617916_thumb.jpg

The camera is a Logitech 9000 webcam. They were very good in their day, with a decent lens, but the resolution is not that high. Being a few years out of date I managed to get a bargain on eBay.

I followed this tutorial to mount it on a microphone boom - itself another low cost on-line find.

But who said the camera doesn't get in the way!?! Most of the time I'm looking over the top of it, with my hands underneath it. It has made one or two operations very awkward.

post-14390-0-35951600-1529617948_thumb.jpg

I'm enjoying making these films, but grossly underestimated the amount of time the editing and voice-over recording would take. I'm taking up to 2 hours to produce 10 minutes. Hopefully I'll get a bit quicker!

I'm using nothing more sophisticated than the now-obsolete Windows Movie Maker.

Another episode is on its way, but after that I'll need to take a break for a few days while I catch up with the rest of my life!

 

Nick.

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