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TurboSnail

TurboSnail's Workbench - 3D Printing and General Bodgery

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Can someone explain what's going on with the condensing pipes there? They go very low down into the side-tanks - I'm expecting the smokebox to fill with water! The pipes usually run above tank level, curving round to join the tank around half-way along. Not a criticism of the CAD, which depicts the prototype correctly.

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I actually don't know if any were un-condensed, I also know very little about the class as a whole. But I do know they are absolutely perfect for the Widened Lines! :)

Like your plan I would be running it in SECR livery with Hattons 4 wheelers but modified to Widened Lines standards. I'm going to get an ex-LCDR R from South Eastern Finecast to also use on those services.

Edited by LU Standard Stock

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5 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Can someone explain what's going on with the condensing pipes there? They go very low down into the side-tanks - I'm expecting the smokebox to fill with water! 

You are assuming that the pipes end as soon as they enter the tank, rather than continuing inside, enveloped by water, to cool down the steam inside...

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8 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Can someone explain what's going on with the condensing pipes there? They go very low down into the side-tanks - I'm expecting the smokebox to fill with water! The pipes usually run above tank level, curving round to join the tank around half-way along. Not a criticism of the CAD, which depicts the prototype correctly.

 

I've no idea! There's very little info available online, and I don't have the correct reference books to look it up. I'm only assuming they're condensing pipes, no clue what else they may be though.

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3 minutes ago, Regularity said:

You are assuming that the pipes end as soon as they enter the tank, rather than continuing inside, enveloped by water, to cool down the steam inside...

 

Thinking about it, there is also the odd loop on top of the tanks that may be related to this somehow...

Edited by TurboSnail

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Just now, TurboSnail said:

 

Thinking about it, there is also the odd loop on top of the tanks that may be related to this somehow...

Yes. The condensing pipe passes through the water, then through that loop, which acts as a trap to stop water being sucked from the tanks into the smoke box.

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Presumably a good idea that others found too complex to be worth implementing.

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4 minutes ago, Compound2632 said:

Presumably a good idea that others found too complex to be worth implementing.

I can only presume that it was a bugg3r for maintenance purposes!

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CR 1 and 29 classes had a similar arrangement for working through the Glasgow Central low level lines. The drivers didn't like condensing, though, since condensing the steam heated up the water in the tanks and injectors didn't work so well with hot water. 

 

Jim

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53 minutes ago, LU Standard Stock said:

This is the only picture I have of the F Class, at Victoria station. It's in Steam on the Widened Lines volume 2.

 

I have a couple of others on my reference sheet, can dig out better copies if you want.

 

15747025666436946976521547462057.jpg.86970bcde4af407eb7a0ec97bc8d7c39.jpg

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Does anyone have any info or pictures of the Manning Wardle Class B/C? I've got the '74 Railway Modeller article, but there's not much background, and no photos.

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3 hours ago, TurboSnail said:

Does anyone have any info or pictures of the Manning Wardle Class B/C? I've got the '74 Railway Modeller article, but there's not much background, and no photos.

I've probably got photos, either in my collection, or in books. I'll see what I can find.

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6 hours ago, Ruston said:

I've probably got photos, either in my collection, or in books. I'll see what I can find.

 

That would be very useful, thanks!

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I've had a look through my photos and I can't find either an A or a B but I have a book with a drawing. I need to get the scanner to talk to the computer but until then here is some info that you may find useful.

 

Class B and C are the same with the exception that Class C has 7in. cylinders as opposed to the B's 6in. Only 14 B were built to standard gauge and only 2 C were built in total (both standard gauge). More B were built to narrow gauges than standard and ranged from 2ft. 4in. to 3ft. for British service (I haven't looked up those built for service overseas).

 

Length over buffer beam - 13ft. 9in.

Width over buffer beam 7ft. 2in.

Wheelbase 4ft. 7in.

Wheel diameter 2ft. 6in.

Height (rail to chimney top) 9ft.

 

Years built - 1863 to 1872.

 

As regards modelling one in 4mm then good luck with that! There are no driving wheels available (that I am aware of) in the required diameter and I can't think of a RTR chassis that could fit.

 

So you can get an idea of just how small they wre, here's a standard gauge Class E, which is around a foot longer and on 2ft. 9in. wheels.

785classE-1.jpg.d64559df9ed15b77995e789ee0eed020.jpg

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Mike Sharman used to do some suitable wheels for a Class B because that was what I used for my scratchbuilt in brass P4 example of the breed.  I fitted a tiny can motor into it by using the casing of the can motor to represent the boiler and it had a very tiny worm drive gearbox hidden in the firebox.  It took me ages to build despite being so small and I'm sure I did my eyesight a mischief with all those tiny details I was mad enough to model.  It couldn't pull much, but it did look very pretty.  Sorry no photos, - I've never really been a camera owning person and I sold the model ages ago.

Edited by Annie
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2mmscale association do a range of wheels from 13mm down to 7mm, which includes 10mm, 9.5 and 9mm (depending how m,uch wear you want to depict on your rims. These for example would not be drasically out if you removed every second spoke and added in the balancing blank crankpin position, which should be fairly easy as the centers are brass. And with them being split axle you don't have to worry about pickups. Aklternatively there is bound to be something N guage with bigger flanges.

wheels.jpg.86f67dfcdb4b26891df5624f642a3ef5.jpg

Edited by webbcompound
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1 hour ago, Ruston said:

Class B and C are the same with the exception that Class C has 7in. cylinders as opposed to the B's 6in. Only 14 B were built to standard gauge and only 2 C were built in total (both standard gauge).

 

Hmm - the only info I have is RM Drake-Brockman's article and drawings in Railway Modeller (Jan '74, I think). He also notes the larger cylinders on the C, but also states that the C has a larger firebox, so not sure which source is right! 

 

1 hour ago, Ruston said:

As regards modelling one in 4mm then good luck with that! There are no driving wheels available (that I am aware of) in the required diameter and I can't think of a RTR chassis that could fit.

 

The vaguely formed plan so far is to use Gibson 10.5mm wagon wheels (0.5mm overscale, which is hardly a compromise!), with the centres pressed out and replaced with 3D printed ones, so I can accurately represent the double-boss type. I have sketched up a quick chassis concept and I think I can make it fit! I'm well aware that my enthusiasm may outweigh my talent, but I'm enjoying the engineering challenge.

 

56 minutes ago, Annie said:

I fitted a tiny can motor into it by using the casing of the can motor to represent the boiler and it had a very tiny worm drive gearbox hidden in the firebox.

 

Clever - I've heard of this done before, but I guess it requires well chosen gears to get the boiler at the right height? I think the motor I have in mind is small enough to go inside the boiler (just), so I'm trying to rig up a 4 wheel drive system so I don't have the struggle of getting conrods to function properly. 

 

17 minutes ago, webbcompound said:

2mmscale association do a range of wheels from 13mm down to 7mm, which includes 10mm, 9.5 and 9mm (depending how m,uch wear you want to depict on your rims. These for example would not be drasically out if you removed every second spoke and added in the balancing blank crankpin position, which should be fairly easy as the centers are brass. And with them being split axle you don't have to worry about pickups. Aklternatively there is bound to be something N guage with bigger flanges.

 

Might have to look into this - as mentioned earlier I'll be making my own wheel centres, so I really only need the tyres.

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I like the idea of printed wheels. It opens up possibilities for lots of engines from our period that have distinctive and odd wheels that simply aren't available from the usual manufacturers.

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Well, the 2mm association wheels plan has failed. They only sell to members, and it seems a bit backward to pay a years membership for £3 worth of tyres. Oh well. Back to Gibson's and ignore the 0.5mm overscale, which won't be hard.

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What size axles are you planning on using?

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2 hours ago, Ruston said:

What size axles are you planning on using?

 

2mm. Fits with the gears I'm planning to use, or the backup gears if plan A fails. Will probably reuse the original Gibson axle if I can't buy just the tyres separately.

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image.png.59d9ecc7370534eae22a0ce2f80e5f30.png.b7061f94c28454ac198b2703d113109c.png

On 27/08/2019 at 16:53, TurboSnail said:

 

The design is finished and awaiting a test print. It was a personal project, so there are a few other locos (i.e. commissions) before it in the queue. I have all the wheels, gears and bits to do it, so it's just a case of waiting for a gap in the schedule.

 

 

 

Frames for the Lady of the Lakes.

Frames-002.jpg.03cafe81bc54d302b06a6716ff9b5948.jpg

The crank pin ends and the rod retaining pieces are still rough in this shot as it all needs to come apart for the gearbox fitting but when it's finally assembled the retaining pieces will have to be soldered on and trimmed with a file. I've tapped the cranks and their spacers to 10BA, so you can simply unscrew them but after fitting the gearbox I would recommend a drop of loctite on the threads to prevent the cranks from getting out of quarter.

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