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Over the last seventy years these structures have become evermore commonplace on the British landscape, yet seldom modelled on home/exhibition layouts. Photos show the variety and detail that can be achieved in 4mm scale.post-34542-0-20981400-1529703599_thumb.jpegpost-34542-0-89496800-1529703647_thumb.jpegpost-34542-0-12126100-1529703718_thumb.jpegpost-34542-0-86033800-1529703792_thumb.jpeg

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Problem with pylons is that they are way too large for most layouts and so would end up dominating the layout.

 

Only the smaller wooden distribution poles can be used on rural layouts without domination.

 

The best place for pylons would be in the distance on backscenes.

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Perhaps one under construction?

 

An interesting diorama and essay in Plastruct and Evergreen!

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This is a subject that has often made me think as they seem to be a feature close to many railway lines /sites, and never seem to feature. But as stated above like many large structures and trees etc a true scale model would most definitely overpower the scene, so maybe scaled down models that look visually correct is the way to go.

 

As welly has pointed out above, the backscene is probably the best option for including such structures. I have done this on my latest layout and on several of the Scarborough and district railway modellers club layouts,...see nick skeltons great little Scottish TMD themed layout in BRM magazine last summer(just forget which exact issue ).

I will try and get some photos uploaded here when I find them out.

 

I am considering creating scale 2D CAD templates for the various pylons etc, as construction jigs, for those wishing to scratchbuild.

Also, I may well consider other templates if there is an interest.These would be for more obscure or everyday structures that are seldom ever modelled. I have already created streetlighting template drawings for the old concrete type lamposts which there are many styles. Which, again are a very common sight in real life.

 

Obviously,a small charge would have to be put in place to cover the usual things. But,as with scale scenes etc once you have the file you can print off as many as you need.

This is just something I'm considering at the moment...maybe some feedback on RMweb would be useful to see what others think.

(Sorry if I've gone a bit OT here)

 

Cheers, Rich

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This is a subject that has often made me think as they seem to be a feature close to many railway lines /sites, and never seem to feature. But as stated above like many large structures and trees etc a true scale model would most definitely overpower the scene, so maybe scaled down models that look visually correct is the way to go.

As welly has pointed out above, the backscene is probably the best option for including such structures. I have done this on my latest layout and on several of the Scarborough and district railway modellers club layouts,...see nick skeltons great little Scottish TMD themed layout in BRM magazine last summer(just forget which exact issue ).

I will try and get some photos uploaded here when I find them out.

I am considering creating scale 2D CAD templates for the various pylons etc, as construction jigs, for those wishing to scratchbuild.

Also, I may well consider other templates if there is an interest.These would be for more obscure or everyday structures that are seldom ever modelled. I have already created streetlighting template drawings for the old concrete type lamposts which there are many styles. Which, again are a very common sight in real life.

Obviously,a small charge would have to be put in place to cover the usual things. But,as with scale scenes etc once you have the file you can print off as many as you need.

This is just something I'm considering at the moment...maybe some feedback on RMweb would be useful to see what others think.

(Sorry if I've gone a bit OT here)

Cheers, Rich

 

Generally it’s agreed that many of the tower designs can be too imposing (L2 -L6) ,but there are smaller versions which can blend into many scenes. The PL1 dates back nearly eighties years and in many cases is only fifty feet high .

Both the 2D CAD templates and printed back scene options would be interesting , affording modellers either space or scratch building development. Poles or “polons” would be the other route although sadly ready made British outline versions appear to be non existent .

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Very nice models indeed, especially the substations. Presumably professional commissions?

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Ohh droool.... I love the PL1b... and I have been thinking the same if it could be made from the Hornby model, which in itself appears to a mash of two PL1 towers. I have been pondering about how to make my own PL design towers using the drawings that I acquired online some years ago and I asked a question on how best to make models e.g. etching or 3D printed only to be 'slapped down' by some other members. And so the idea remains on my back burner.

Please show more photos of any other towers you might have modelled. As you might guess I am quite into my pylons too lol.

 

Cheers Paul

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Are the Hornby pylons scale size or too small?

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Are the Hornby pylons scale size or too small?

They’re about 1/3 the size they should be! A bit too small for Z gauge...

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A good use of pylons which you very rarely see on layouts would be to model the network connection to the railway electrical system on a layout with overhead wires.

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On 23/06/2018 at 18:46, russ p said:

Are the Hornby pylons scale size or too small?

 

They are scaled to 50’ which is correct for the early 33kV towers. Today the most common and recognised designs are the L2 and L6 towers at around 130ft / 170ft , these would dominate all but the very largest layouts .

Edited by Pylon King
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Were PL1s still around in the mid 60s?

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Very nice models indeed, especially the substations. Presumably professional commissions?

Thank you. L6 tower was constructed from blueprints supplied by the National Grid as my model sample . With the substation this was purchased from the Astolat Model Railway Club stand at their show for only £20 . Completely scratch built it must have taken many weeks to construct , measures 24” by 17”. The other models were also constructed by myself to expand the “grid” collection. All are 4mm/scale.

Edited by Pylon King

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On 23/06/2018 at 17:43, pharrc20 said:

Ohh droool.... I love the PL1b... and I have been thinking the same if it could be made from the Hornby model, which in itself appears to a mash of two PL1 towers. I have been pondering about how to make my own PL design towers using the drawings that I acquired online some years ago and I asked a question on how best to make models e.g. etching or 3D printed only to be 'slapped down' by some other members. And so the idea remains on my back burner.

Please show more photos of any other towers you might have modelled. As you might guess I am quite into my pylons too lol.

Cheers Paul

Nice to know there are other pylon appreciators out there .

 

post-34542-0-16275200-1529785340_thumb.jpeg

 

Edited by Pylon King
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Are they still in use,how far apart would they be?

Looks like in the not to distant future some Hornby PL1s could be a blot on the 1960s north Norfolk skyline!

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Transmission Towers...not pylons, .so I am reliably informed!  A friend used to maintain them.

 

The Pink Pylon (sigh) was interesting!

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Thanks Pylon King, lovely PL1S indeed.

I did a survey of some in the field near Hartford and Stalybridge some years for my project to identify the tower designs as the set of drawings for PL towers is missing the Single circuit tower drawings.

I have done many 'fieldtrips' to different places to bag different designs but my favourites have to be L2s.

 

Cheers Paul

Nice to know there are other pylon appreciators out there .The Hornby models are identical to a set of PL1 towers found just outside Winchester which are approximately 50” high .

More photos - the PL1S model is based on a prototype,the line running from Didcot to Oxford.

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Hi russ p, the standard span length between PL1 towers was 900 ft. and a standard D2 suspension tower was 79ft.

3in high.

Cheers Paul

Are they still in use,how far apart would they be?

Looks like in the not to distant future some Hornby PL1s could be a blot on the 1960s north Norfolk skyline!

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