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Deciphering the Golden Way - Pullman History with Alex.


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On 26/11/2020 at 18:04, AVS1998 said:

The 'latest and most modern' carriages would be ex-SECR and early Southern era 'Continentals' alongside 'modern' Maunsell carriages. The former are available from Worsley Works, or from Bill Bedford as brass kits; Hornby's Maunsells should be fine at source.


I started another thread dealing with the Maunsells in the train -- I now have a plan for what to do with those. As far as I can tell, the difference between a Maunsell boat train second and a Maunsell third of the same period is entirely interior and decals, so I should be good to reproduce what I need for that from Hornby shells.

I know the 6 compartment brake seconds received Malachite pre-war, but none of the other coaches did. Given the fact that a) Hornby never did a low-window 6 compartment brake in Malachite, and b) Hornby's interpretation of Malachite is ... questionable, I'll be repainting the brakes. But the rest should be just transfers and varnish. I do need to work out if the seconds were actually labelled up as such -- a '2' or 'Second' decal is probably going to be a challenge to obtain, given how rare seconds were.
 

On 26/11/2020 at 18:04, AVS1998 said:

As to the Pullmans themselves:

 

Grosvenor and  Myrtle  (1908, 1911) were always used on this services (Ford, 2008), alternating between them, having been remodelled into Buffet cars in 1935/6, complete with a bar and had their roofline lowered to allow for further roaming. these two cars for sure were use on that route.


Interesting that these two don't have the recessed doors that are typical of Pullman appearance in Britain. This matches several long shots I have of the Newhaven Boat train (from multiple eras), which shows one coach different from the others, but not with the typical Pullman recessed doors. It could well be one of these two coaches.
 

On 26/11/2020 at 18:04, AVS1998 said:

One thing does seem to be sure - no SECR 12-wheel cars ever seem to have appeared on the Newhaven train, making things both simpler and more complex, as you can't use Hornby's cars, but it now means you have to scratch-build, modify or build kits of cars to get what you want. 

 

I can safely stop watching those on eBay then -- good to know, as they tend to go for decent money...

 

On 26/11/2020 at 18:04, AVS1998 said:

If you look back to the earliest 'proper' boat trains to the port that included Pullmans, they were always solitary, and it seems to have always been that way. The Newhaven route was a shorter run than those in Kent, at least to the port itself, and so there wasn't really any time for a sit-down meal. A bar with coffee, sandwiches and beverages made much more sense. One could eat properly on the crossing.

 

The LB&SC made much of Newhaven being close to London -- I believe only Tilbury is closer.

 

On 26/11/2020 at 18:04, AVS1998 said:

If you wanted to model these ex-LBSCR cars, the easiest way would be to use the Worsley Works 'kit' with 247 bogies (though I think these are a tad expensive, personally) or use the Hornby 6-wheel bogie Pullman spares. You'd have to figure out how to modify the plug mounting, though. I think by this time, Pullman or Southern standard buffers would also be fitted, so they'd be suitable.

 

Definitely "kit" in scare quotes for these. Site says etched sides, floor and ends. I'm not sure if it even includes a roof from their description...

That's ... one to build up to, I think. I'm happy hacking plastic about, and I can solder electronics, but I haven't built a brass kit yet, let alone one where it looks like so much of it needs to be sourced elsewhere.

It does seem like the ideal coach to have in the train though...

 

On 26/11/2020 at 18:04, AVS1998 said:

The 12-wheel cars weren't fully withdrawn until around 1962, comparatively late for all-wood construction carriages. I believe they were among the last 12-wheel or all-wood vehicles on the Southern, for sure.


1962 is also when the Newhaven trains received Mk1 stock. So it's possible these two coaches even survived the 1955 and 1957 boat train set re-formations (which saw lots of Maunsell opens replacing previous corridor stock, but catering is notably absent from the set formations).


Thanks -- this post has been very helpful :)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Afternoon all,

 

I received this edition of the Brighton Circle, which had an interesting snippet on the 'Brighton Pullman Cars', those being the quartet of 1914, Hibernia, Orpheus, Glencoe and Scotia, which, the author seems to allege, may never have run on Brighton metals.

 

The cars were all delivered in 1914 with the intention of being run on the Eastbourne Sunday service, to replace the ageing shorter clerestories, and were even exhibited together for viewing, but were put into storage from August of that year until transferred to the SE&CR in early summer of 1916 for the express use of Imperial General Staff on Dover - Victoria runs. It appears that they may have remained in Kent after the War - certainly I've never seen any evidence to support a return, and in much literature they are referred to as being SE&CR cars, which confused me at first, but with this information it makes more sense.

 

image.png.56003934ec4b985233b9540205d6474b.png

 

Pullman quartet on display at Eastbourne, Wednesday 25th March 1914 (Eastbourne Gazette, British Newspaper Archive). 

 

Three new third class buffet cars were built in 1922 on recovered GWR and LNWR ambulance underframes to provide catering on all-third trains. These cars were 18, 19 and 20. Presumably these were to type J or K, all built on ambulance frames, all between 57-59' over the vestibules, from what I can find of drawings of contemporary cars from 1921-22 for the Chatham and Brighton, respectively. 

 

There is also a suspicion that car number 10, formerly Her Majesty, was used from 1922 as a second-class buffet car on Newhaven trains, though it isn't clear if it was relabelled in its cartouches or if it just remained 'car number 10'. This was the first second-class car on the LB&SC - the SE&CR had used second-class on their Hastings and Folkestone Car trains, and I believe there were some on the two Kentish CIWL trains in the 1880s. 

 

Food for thought.

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Hello again, 

 

I have a small update to the 12 wheel brake commission I will be working on. As preparatory work, I compared the Farish shells to the drawing in Ford (2008, p. 78) again and the roof over the vestibules stands out as an anomaly. They match the cut-back pattern but need to be the full-length pattern.

 

IMG_20201222_181256.jpg.0d807babccf7e52199f83b3183d99564.jpg

 

IMG_20201222_181232.jpg.892bb785239ecf7d7b21146c7f609d48.jpg

 

This can be fixed in a similar fashion to 5Bel's cars with plastic card and filler. Though, I did consider using the vestibule or at least the roof from a pair of Dublo 1951 type cars, but the vestibules are too short and don't match the curvature of the Clayton pattern (I learned recently that Lincoln, Birmingham and other builders had slightly different vestibule end curves which facilitates identification of manufacturer). 

 

IMG_20201222_181531.jpg.5a91be48f5d5dafb730d985c2824e6a3.jpg

 

This shouldn't be a huge issue, and may be remedied with more filler and plastic strip. 

 

I did double check the window arrangement as some of these brakes were rebuilt in later years with reduced seating, but for the time period it appears that the bodies are spot-on. 

 

- Alex

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Today I received my quarterly edition of The Golden Way and I'm so excited to see my article in this volume! 

 

20201224_103845.jpg.7dede6c6698294479a22a0c262cabda9.jpg

 

It's a small step, but the more I write, peer review and am published, the more of a portfolio I accrue for my CV. It also doesn't hurt to acquire that knowledge and hone my research skills further... 

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Posted (edited)

Good evening friends, tonight's update takes us back to my first-ever 'custom' commission, a pair of ex-GER twelve-wheel Parlour Third Brakes, converted from Graham Farish 00 models. 

 

I placed an order with Lendons of Cardiff and with Peter's Spares for two pairs of bogies at the former (jolly affordable, too, at £3.98 a pair) and the Keen Systems twelve-wheel car upgrade set, times two, along with the LNER/Pullman buffer kit. The original intention had been to model GER buffers, but as the only ones I could find online were intended for 19th century four-and-six-wheel carriages, it seemed pertinent to go with standard pattern buffers for this modeller's period - the mid-1930s.

 

After all of this, the model was disassembled (read: the body was separated from the one-piece chassis) and I set to work removing the pre-existing bufferbeams (easily snapped off, due to the age of the glue), sanding it all flush and then attaching the new bufferbeams, fitted with the large-pattern Southern buffer heads. 

 

image.png.afc513e9f9eff38e0ee8f26b3de0eb57.png

 

Next to be dealt with were the coupling cams. I'd considered using the standard Hornby ones, but as both myself and the commissioner are trying to keep expenditure low, we agreed the Keen kit was more cost-effective. The side 'prongs' of these cams needed to be shortened slightly to fit between the frames of the Farish chassis - easily rounded off with an emery board until they fit. I believe I only had to take off around 3mm. The cams now fitted nicely over the Farish bogie mounts and could be retained with shortened pieces of plastic card, or, as I'm using, shortened Maunsell cam retaining plates (from my own stash, following conversion to bufferbeam-mounted Kadees)

 

image.png.bfdf2b4c8d9cbf544362bbc1ef3a5b8f.png

 

image.png.2e0ac21fd1e044417f5e552b2f72719a.png

 

(The Keen cam, cream, compared with a Hornby Maunsell one, near-identical to a Pullman cam.)

 

Later in the build, these cams will receive springing, but this can wait until the chassis has been detailed and painted.

 

A note on the bogies - my intention is to retain the pickups and feed the wiring through a small hole drilled in the chassis. The bogie mounts will be re-used for the bogies, which will have a hole drilled off-centre and retained in the chassis with a nylon screw, to allow for insulation. The swing will be different to that of other twelve-wheel cars, but they will still run and I believe it easier to do this than to weaken the chassis with modification for bogie clip sockets. 

 

Moving onto the bogie, the car ends will be receiving the Keen gangways in due course. However, due to their design, these fittings have a large raised locating step on one piece, which would hold the mouldings away from the body in a gross fashion. These were sanded flat on one piece, experimentally, and I believe I have concocted a way to retain the floating end plate mechanism. 

 

image.png.a84537c98afe7700668ece575c8cdb7c.png

 

Modified on the left, original on the right. 

 

For now, I'll continue to focus on detailing the underframe and making it as good as I can. For now, I am very pleased with the result, and believe the customer will be, too. If the Keen gangways don't work out, I'll explore alternative routes. The largest part of this build will be the body modification and fitting of interior lights. I am torn between sourcing wrecked Pullman brakes and cannibalising them for parts (always useful) or using the DCC Concepts kit - though they'd be costly and I've never done that much soldering. I'd be able to reuse the original seating, however, which would be a boon... 

 

I hope this is of interest - I'm finding recording it highly useful.

 

- Alex 

 

 

Edited by AVS1998
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  • 2 weeks later...

A little bit of preparatory work tonight whilst watching @BlueLightning's stream building a Branchlines SECR Invalid Saloon kit. 

 

image.png.e8dd136ba7f2c6bd2b6b228b20a01e18.png

 

Though the lines don't come up too clearly in the photo, I've marked out a portion of the chassis to be cut out in order to allow for bogie rotation. This will be covered over in time by matchboard plastic sheet, so I'm not terribly worried about the appearance - rigidity, on the other hand... I hope the body can maintain that. The paper to the left of the top model is a template for the cutting out of a new oval window, as the factory ones are grossly under-nourished. 

 

Listening to Gary's own preparation work leaves me feeling reassured of my own modelling, and hopefully a bit more confident for my SECR brass carriage builds in my main workbench thread. If those go well, who knows, etched Pullmans may be on the cards in the future!

 

- Alex 

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More on the Bexhill/Hastings Pullman service, thanks to being able to view a copy of the 1908 carriage working manual of the LBSCR - my thanks to Ian White. 

 

It appears (though I may well be reading this wrong) that by this time, the former Bexhill Special may either have not had a Pullman attached at all, or it was attached on an ad-hoc, unrecorded basis. The Up service (8:15 to London Bridge) consisted of:

 

Bogie Third Brake

Bogie Compo

Bogie Lav Compo

Bogie Third Brake

 

This set was reused for the Down 17:20 service, by this time running without a Pullman, at least on Mondays. Surprisingly, there is only one comparable Up train ex-Eastbourne, the 9:30, with the Victoria portion containing the Pullman car. 

 

This was Set 81, according the 1908 guide, but there's no trace of Pullmans. The set remained in use on the Down Victoria service through 1915 but by 1916 had been put to other routes. Curiously, by 1921, the set had returned to its dedicated Up/Down Hastings service, to identical timings, but had now been condensed:

 

Bogie Third Slip Brake (367)

Bogie Lav First (150)

Bogie Third Slip Brake (475)

 

This 17:20 departure seems to have always consisted of a Hastings, Eastbourne and Seaford portion. Useful to know.

The Easter of 1908 appears to have had additional Pullman cars servicing Hastings;

 

image.png.31b4dbb721d63f7f5900c0cfd118c406.png

 

(Gentlewoman - Saturday 18th April 1908)

 

image.png.f0728f27af9ca8795cd44074ed337163.png

 

(Illustrated London News, Saturday 11th April 1908)

 

I expect I'll find out when Volume Four is released of The Bible that the cars were curtailed at Eastbourne. However, other advertisements from the era state the presence of 'Drawing-room cars on certain trains' for Hastings - Eastbourne services (albeit seasonal and holiday specials) so I'd be wary of taking that for a permanent fixture. 

 

It's interesting to see that the sets remained largely similar in constitution and almost always identical in their timings - I suppose because the train was one of the further-reaching ones, maintaining a particular time slot around the ever-intensifying suburban network was fairly straightforward, compared to finding additional paths for Brighton trains and whathaveyou.

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I've returned to the GER car commission today, I haven't touched it in a while and supposed I ought to do some work on the project. 

 

Starting with the underframes, I began, with a cutting disc, to cut up the side bars to allow the bogie a field of motion.

 

image.png.d65fc68a72def0326d319ca39c420b02.png

 

The car on the right has had the procedure done, the car on the left retaining its original underframe for now. A sanding drum and then an emery board and craft knife were used to clean up the cut-outs (Farish plastic melts and frays very easily, it's a very strange substance)

 

image.png.11f81212d9318a88507b991c2e2723d6.png

 

The ride height was set temporarily with washers - I may retain these, albeit in a smaller size to match the eventual nylon screws. In order to tidy things up further, I've sanded down the sides of both cars to allow for better priming and filling, and also so I can attach planked plastic sheeting to the sides to extend the matchboarding down over the underframe to create the illusion of an all-wooden car. 

 

I've been ruminating on how to recreate the vestibule end shape and roofline - it's quite a complex form.

 

image.png.457e8031cfba508d122b490047843cec.png

 

The best I've come up with is extending the height of the vestibule end and forming it from there, and with regards to the fascia, a thin plastistruct strip, cut to shape, may work. The only stumbling block might be the width of the vestibule, as it was wider than the later-standard cut-back design. I can make it work, though. 

 

 

 

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More work on the Pullman brakes today, seeing as the new parts arrived. 

 

The 7mm handrail knobs I ordered are a little short, but stood on a shim they should even out. Thankfully the brass wire is easy to bend into the correct shape, so I'll get the tie-rods soldered up and glued into place on the underframe in time. 

 

I tinkered with the ride height a bit more the other night, and I'm finally happy with the results when compared to other cars (not the best photo, I'll admit):

 

image.png.57535ba3e9075d1adbd6ec0e13282ded.png

 

Some of you will no doubt be amused by the M6 screws I ordered, thinking they'd be far smaller: 

 

image.png.8943160bc7c9d7b711f1b65cdadceaff.png

 

They're being returned and exchanged for M2 screws instead, as with the washers. With any luck, they'll be far more suitable. 

 

I also reminded myself why I hate cutting plastic sheet:

 

image.png.1cd62475fc892fde91e8daa38e1d39c0.png

 

It is incredibly hard to cut in a straight line! Still, with a bit of slow, steady filing, it should even out. The waist (dado?) rail I'll reinstate with some fine microstrip in time. I attempted to mimic the curve toward the vestibules, but I'm not convinced it went too well. 

 

image.png.082ed8d87393e9fe8a929643a2e28568.png

 

I also added some strip below the luggage compartment door, to try and extend it down and make it even with the rest of the bodyside. This will be filled in and tidied up, too, as it was steel on the prototype. 

 

Overall, I'm pleased with how it's going - it might not look the best at the moment, but I can tidy it up as I go along, and learn from my mistakes. Not cutting away the original planking on the body as I did on my own brake definitely made things far easier, and preserved structural rigidity.

 

Hopefully I'll be able to get them into primer in the next few weeks. 

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12 minutes ago, AVS1998 said:

I also reminded myself why I hate cutting plastic sheet:

.........

It is incredibly hard to cut in a straight line!

Don't try to cut all the way through with one cut.  Just make the first few strokes lightly, concentrating on keeping the (well sharpened) blade tight against your straight edge (steel rule or whatever), pressing a little more heavily each time.  Once you have a line cut into the plastic, you can remove the straight edge and then the blade will follow the line, again so long as you don't lean to heavily and concentrate on following the line.  Once you're about half way through (depending on the thickness) you should be able to break the piece off along the line by flexing the plastic back and forth a few times.  You may then need to square up the cut (in the vertical plane) by placing the straight edge along the edge of the piece and using the tip of a sharp knife.  The ridge formed on either side of the cut can either be shaved off by running the blade along almost parallel to the surface, or burnished down with the end of a steel rule.

 

HTH,

 

Jim

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Just now, Caley Jim said:

Don't try to cut all the way through with one cut.  Just make the first few strokes lightly, concentrating on keeping the (well sharpened) blade tight against your straight edge (steel rule or whatever), pressing a little more heavily each time.  Once you have a line cut into the plastic, you can remove the straight edge and then the blade will follow the line, again so long as you don't lean to heavily and concentrate on following the line.  Once you're about half way through (depending on the thickness) you should be able to break the piece off along the line by flexing the plastic back and forth a few times.  You may then need to square up the cut (in the vertical plane) by placing the straight edge along the edge of the piece and using the tip of a sharp knife.  The ridge formed on either side of the cut can either be shaved off by running the blade along almost parallel to the surface, or burnished down with the end of a steel rule.

 

HTH,

 

Jim

 

That's my method, but the blade still slips sometimes or I'll lose my grip on the ruler and that'll ruin the cut. Definitely one to keep practicing though. 

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53 minutes ago, AVS1998 said:

 

That's my method, but the blade still slips sometimes or I'll lose my grip on the ruler and that'll ruin the cut. Definitely one to keep practicing though. 

Hi AVS

 

I use a cheap steel rule as it has a burr along one edge which assists the rule to grip the plasticard being cut. It is also of quite a thick section which helps, thin flexible rules move about when running the knife along them.

 

Gibbo.

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On 25/03/2021 at 17:55, Gibbo675 said:

I use a cheap steel rule as it has a burr along one edge which assists the rule to grip the plasticard being cut. It is also of quite a thick section which helps, thin flexible rules move about when running the knife along them.


I use a rule shaped in a sort of wavy M shape, which I find far easier to use than a flat rule for cutting against. It's also safer - a slip with a blade is much less likely to contact any fingers.

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5 hours ago, Bloodnok said:


I use a rule shaped in a sort of wavy M shape, which I find far easier to use than a flat rule for cutting against. It's also safer - a slip with a blade is much less likely to contact any fingers.

That’s called a “non-slip rule”, for obvious reasons.

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On 25/03/2021 at 12:59, AVS1998 said:

 

That's my method, but the blade still slips sometimes or I'll lose my grip on the ruler and that'll ruin the cut. Definitely one to keep practicing though. 

Part is the angle of the blade, the wrong angle and it looks to wander.

ask me how I know.

richard 

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12 hours ago, richard i said:

Part is the angle of the blade, the wrong angle and it looks to wander.

ask me how I know.

richard 

Agreed! Angling the blade towards the straight edge helps to stop it wandering. 

 

Jim 

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I switched to using an Olfa / Tamiya plastic cutter instead of a scalpel or craft knife and found cutting plastic sheet much easier as a result. You need less pressure and it's more controllable as you are basically pulling it along the straight edge. The design of the blade is basically a 'skrawker' and so removes a narrow strip of material instead of making a furrow, which results in a faster and cleaner cut - you can scribe planking without having to clean off the ridges thrown up by scribing with a knife. They are also a quick way of cutting out sheet metal as well, using the same skrawk and bend technique as per plastic sheet. 

Edited by CKPR
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  • 4 weeks later...

Alex - do you have a 'go-to' brand for Pullman decals? Two of my cars were in good enough nick for me to keep the Farish lining/crests/Pullman lettering plus Precision Labels name/number panels. The third one has driven me up the wall as it was always unlined and HMRS Pressfix is proving uncooperative - too sticky/flimsy to easily manoeuvre in the event of things going awry. I may have it finished next week but suspect it will always have a 'best side' that never gets easily seen on my layout or on camera...

 

Modelmaster and Fox look pricey for what they are, Railtec products are good but their Pullman range is very limited.

 

David

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On 25/03/2021 at 16:31, AVS1998 said:

More work on the Pullman brakes today, seeing as the new parts arrived. 

 

The 7mm handrail knobs I ordered are a little short, but stood on a shim they should even out. Thankfully the brass wire is easy to bend into the correct shape, so I'll get the tie-rods soldered up and glued into place on the underframe in time. 

 

I tinkered with the ride height a bit more the other night, and I'm finally happy with the results when compared to other cars (not the best photo, I'll admit):

 

image.png.57535ba3e9075d1adbd6ec0e13282ded.png

 

Some of you will no doubt be amused by the M6 screws I ordered, thinking they'd be far smaller: 

 

image.png.8943160bc7c9d7b711f1b65cdadceaff.png

 

They're being returned and exchanged for M2 screws instead, as with the washers. With any luck, they'll be far more suitable. 

 

I also reminded myself why I hate cutting plastic sheet:

 

image.png.1cd62475fc892fde91e8daa38e1d39c0.png

 

It is incredibly hard to cut in a straight line! Still, with a bit of slow, steady filing, it should even out. The waist (dado?) rail I'll reinstate with some fine microstrip in time. I attempted to mimic the curve toward the vestibules, but I'm not convinced it went too well. 

 

image.png.082ed8d87393e9fe8a929643a2e28568.png

 

I also added some strip below the luggage compartment door, to try and extend it down and make it even with the rest of the bodyside. This will be filled in and tidied up, too, as it was steel on the prototype. 

 

Overall, I'm pleased with how it's going - it might not look the best at the moment, but I can tidy it up as I go along, and learn from my mistakes. Not cutting away the original planking on the body as I did on my own brake definitely made things far easier, and preserved structural rigidity.

 

Hopefully I'll be able to get them into primer in the next few weeks. 

With a bit of filing & reaming I managed to get the newer style pivot pegs on the Hornby bogies to fit the pivot bosses on chopped up bits of underframe from the older Hornby generic "Big Four" 8-wheelers. Needs a bit of patience though.

 

My No.95 still looks a bit bare in the underframe department. Might have to fit larger battery boxes.

 

David

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On 25/03/2021 at 16:31, AVS1998 said:

More work on the Pullman brakes today, seeing as the new parts arrived. 

 

The 7mm handrail knobs I ordered are a little short, but stood on a shim they should even out. Thankfully the brass wire is easy to bend into the correct shape, so I'll get the tie-rods soldered up and glued into place on the underframe in time. 

 

I tinkered with the ride height a bit more the other night, and I'm finally happy with the results when compared to other cars (not the best photo, I'll admit):

 

image.png.57535ba3e9075d1adbd6ec0e13282ded.png

 

Some of you will no doubt be amused by the M6 screws I ordered, thinking they'd be far smaller: 

 

image.png.8943160bc7c9d7b711f1b65cdadceaff.png

 

They're being returned and exchanged for M2 screws instead, as with the washers. With any luck, they'll be far more suitable. 

 

I also reminded myself why I hate cutting plastic sheet:

 

image.png.1cd62475fc892fde91e8daa38e1d39c0.png

 

It is incredibly hard to cut in a straight line! Still, with a bit of slow, steady filing, it should even out. The waist (dado?) rail I'll reinstate with some fine microstrip in time. I attempted to mimic the curve toward the vestibules, but I'm not convinced it went too well. 

 

image.png.082ed8d87393e9fe8a929643a2e28568.png

 

I also added some strip below the luggage compartment door, to try and extend it down and make it even with the rest of the bodyside. This will be filled in and tidied up, too, as it was steel on the prototype. 

 

Overall, I'm pleased with how it's going - it might not look the best at the moment, but I can tidy it up as I go along, and learn from my mistakes. Not cutting away the original planking on the body as I did on my own brake definitely made things far easier, and preserved structural rigidity.

 

Hopefully I'll be able to get them into primer in the next few weeks. 

Re. the plastic screws - I got hold of some surplus ones at work and they suit the GF underframes pretty well if using Keen 4wh bogies.

 

David

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4 hours ago, David_Belcher said:

Alex - do you have a 'go-to' brand for Pullman decals? Two of my cars were in good enough nick for me to keep the Farish lining/crests/Pullman lettering plus Precision Labels name/number panels. The third one has driven me up the wall as it was always unlined and HMRS Pressfix is proving uncooperative - too sticky/flimsy to easily manoeuvre in the event of things going awry. I may have it finished next week but suspect it will always have a 'best side' that never gets easily seen on my layout or on camera...

 

Modelmaster and Fox look pricey for what they are, Railtec products are good but their Pullman range is very limited.

 

David

 

Hi David,

 

I tend to buy second-hand transfers or bulk lots when I can (I've got friends who often point them out to me for my stash), so I'd say I probably use a fair mix of Fox and HMRS, but find the latter somewhat easier, though I do encounter the problems you do. I've got some PC Transfers Pullman samples, but they're really very, very old and I wouldn't recommend them to anyone. Just an interesting one to have in the collection. 

 

4 hours ago, David_Belcher said:

With a bit of filing & reaming I managed to get the newer style pivot pegs on the Hornby bogies to fit the pivot bosses on chopped up bits of underframe from the older Hornby generic "Big Four" 8-wheelers. Needs a bit of patience though.

 

My No.95 still looks a bit bare in the underframe department. Might have to fit larger battery boxes.

 

David

 

I did this on my original Pullman brake build, but I didn't want to have to go through all the hassle of finding donors, cutting parts etc for this project, and reusing the original mounting bosses on the underframe made more sense. I just need to order the right size screws and washers this time! Though I also need to query eBay and PayPal as I've been charged three times for one order of screws despite having returned and been refunded for them... How odd.

 

Populating the underframe is an odd one, I'm trying to follow other brakes I've seen online and also photos of the prototype where possible but the equipment isn't always clear as to what it is. Either way, I hope the modeller who they're intended for likes the end result. 

 

In other news, I took delivery of my copy of LBSCR Carriages Volume 4 on Wednesday and I was very impressed with the breadth of detail Ian offers - congratulations to him and the contributors! The Pullman chapters in particular were fascinating, I'm eager to read it in more detail when I have time (I'm in hospital at the end of next month so that's an ideal opportunity)

 

- Alex 

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14 hours ago, AVS1998 said:

 

Hi David,

 

I tend to buy second-hand transfers or bulk lots when I can (I've got friends who often point them out to me for my stash), so I'd say I probably use a fair mix of Fox and HMRS, but find the latter somewhat easier, though I do encounter the problems you do. I've got some PC Transfers Pullman samples, but they're really very, very old and I wouldn't recommend them to anyone. Just an interesting one to have in the collection. 

 

 

I did this on my original Pullman brake build, but I didn't want to have to go through all the hassle of finding donors, cutting parts etc for this project, and reusing the original mounting bosses on the underframe made more sense. I just need to order the right size screws and washers this time! Though I also need to query eBay and PayPal as I've been charged three times for one order of screws despite having returned and been refunded for them... How odd.

 

Populating the underframe is an odd one, I'm trying to follow other brakes I've seen online and also photos of the prototype where possible but the equipment isn't always clear as to what it is. Either way, I hope the modeller who they're intended for likes the end result. 

 

In other news, I took delivery of my copy of LBSCR Carriages Volume 4 on Wednesday and I was very impressed with the breadth of detail Ian offers - congratulations to him and the contributors! The Pullman chapters in particular were fascinating, I'm eager to read it in more detail when I have time (I'm in hospital at the end of next month so that's an ideal opportunity)

 

- Alex 

Hi Alex.

 

I like the HMRS ex- PC Pressfix transfers. I cannot get on with waterslide ones for larger/longer items like lining.

 

Have you got Mike King's drawings for the Pullman cars ? They may be useful.

 

MikeKingDrawings (1).docx

 

Thanks for the tip off for LB &SCR Carriages Vol. 4, I was not aware that it had been published.

 

All the best

Ray

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On 23/04/2021 at 20:27, AVS1998 said:

 

Hi David,

 

I tend to buy second-hand transfers or bulk lots when I can (I've got friends who often point them out to me for my stash), so I'd say I probably use a fair mix of Fox and HMRS, but find the latter somewhat easier, though I do encounter the problems you do. I've got some PC Transfers Pullman samples, but they're really very, very old and I wouldn't recommend them to anyone. Just an interesting one to have in the collection. 

 

...

 

- Alex 

 

Railtec have relatively recently increased their Pullman transfer range and now provide a custom Pullman car name service for I think at least two styles of surrounding box (for want of a better term, which I suspect that Alex will know if anyone does).

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3 hours ago, jamespetts said:

 

Railtec have relatively recently increased their Pullman transfer range and now provide a custom Pullman car name service for I think at least two styles of surrounding box (for want of a better term, which I suspect that Alex will know if anyone does).


Cartouche?

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8 hours ago, jamespetts said:

 

Railtec have relatively recently increased their Pullman transfer range and now provide a custom Pullman car name service for I think at least two styles of surrounding box (for want of a better term, which I suspect that Alex will know if anyone does).

 

Indeed, it's an excellent range and their transfers are a joy to use - even if the car name I used for a project turned out to be non-existent... And yes, Linny's right, it's a cartouche the name sits in. 

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