Jump to content

Farish new 8F


Recommended Posts

Thanks for the CAD image Tom.

I'm really glad I've ordered the early crest model as I think the lowered top lamp bracket on the late crest tooling spoils the 'face' of a magnificent loco. Of course it was done to avoid electrocution which you can't argue with.

I had the original Hornby-Dublo model which I thought was great at the time and then the Farish Poole version so I'm looking forward to this one being top of the league.

Most of my trainspotting was done at Barking and 8Fs were regular on freights on the Tilbury Line there in the 50s and early 60s; they never ceased to thrill me with their powerful appearance and fascinating small driving wheels.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My observation of the CAD is the odd mix of rod fixings - what looks like a slot headed screw and a hex bolt head (both somewhat larger than necessary). Is the real loco like that?

 

G

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

That’s standard practice on most Farish Steam engines, and perhaps the one area where some improvement is still needed, but I suppose they are trying to strike a balance between durability and fidelity.

 

Some of the best N Gauge valve gear of recent times has been the Kato anniversary C50, but would the UK N Gauge market accept something as delicate as this given the complaints about the Dapol Schools valve gear, which was reasonably fine but easily damaged if the loco was mishandled.

 

post-1467-0-91389700-1530265745.jpeg

 

Tom.

Edited by TomE
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

My observation of the CAD is the odd mix of rod fixings - what looks like a slot headed screw and a hex bolt head (both somewhat larger than necessary). Is the real loco like that?

 

G

 

The real loco had a fire, water in the boiler and real coal. Can we expect this in future 2mm models  :jester:

  • Funny 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

The real loco had a fire, water in the boiler and real coal. Can we expect this in future 2mm models 

A real fire would probably melt the plastic body (although the water could be used to put it out) but I guess that real coal in the tender would be welcome.

;-)

 

G

Link to post
Share on other sites

My observation of the CAD is the odd mix of rod fixings - what looks like a slot headed screw and a hex bolt head (both somewhat larger than necessary). Is the real loco like that?

 

G

 

Farish stopped putting slot headed screws on the central crank pins on their recent steam models - if you look at the Duchess, Ivatt, etc and you would see that, so I would expect that to continue, and that this first CAD is simply re-using drawing parts from the Black 5 (nothing wrong there, as the two locos are closely related in reality). Dead easy to swap them on slightly older new-tool models to all match as well.

 

Looking at the fidelity of the rods it all looks very good, and the daylight under the boiler is something really quite impressive - the choice of the small diameter coreless motor Farish have moved to is really starting to show its benefits here.

 

Cheers,

Alan

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

That’s standard practice on most Farish Steam engines, and perhaps the one area where some improvement is still needed, but I suppose they are trying to strike a balance between durability and fidelity.

 

Some of the best N Gauge valve gear of recent times has been the Kato anniversary C50, but would the UK N Gauge market accept something as delicate as this given the complaints about the Dapol Schools valve gear, which was reasonably fine but easily damaged if the loco was mishandled.

 

attachicon.gif23087695-696D-4221-8261-94DCBE9B7328.jpeg

 

Tom.

 

I have  a  Kato C50  special  edition  loco  and  have  to  agree,  with Tom,  it  is  delicate,  but  the  actual performance  is  absolutely  superb,  Interesting  DVD  supplied  with  the  loco also, showing  some  of    Kato's  progress  through the  decades,   in Japanese  with  subtitles.

 

The Loco is  available in the UK from  Train Trax  and   the  price  has recently  been  REDUCED

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...

Now that's a pleasant sight, and no sign of a traction tyre yet, glad to see that. Hopefully the running board will be metal for a bit more weight, but I think I might pick up a spare tender drive or two just in case.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

That's looking great for the early crest version but that snowplough will need to come off for me. Hopefully it'll be easily removable.

In box accessory to be user fitted where appropriate.

 

Tom.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that's a pleasant sight, and no sign of a traction tyre yet, glad to see that. Hopefully the running board will be metal for a bit more weight, but I think I might pick up a spare tender drive or two just in case.

 

I am disappointed by the lack of traction tyres personally based on what the WDs with ineffective too deeply recessed tyres can pull but share your hope that the running plate is metal as that would partly compensate. Even blowing Andy's excellent picture up though I can't make up my mind whether it is or just a different colour plastic to show component fit etc.

 

Incidentally - don't tender drives have traction tyres? I can't think of one that doesn't..

 

Regards

 

Roy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

I am disappointed by the lack of traction tyres personally based on what the WDs with ineffective too deeply recessed tyres can pull but share your hope that the running plate is metal as that would partly compensate. Even blowing Andy's excellent picture up though I can't make up my mind whether it is or just a different colour plastic to show component fit etc.

 

Incidentally - don't tender drives have traction tyres? I can't think of one that doesn't..

 

Regards

 

Roy

 

Easy to replace traction tyres on a tender drive. On the loco, it requires dismantling the connecting rods/valve gear. Not a job most of us fancy in 1:148 scale.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am disappointed by the lack of traction tyres personally based on what the WDs with ineffective too deeply recessed tyres can pull but share your hope that the running plate is metal as that would partly compensate. Even blowing Andy's excellent picture up though I can't make up my mind whether it is or just a different colour plastic to show component fit etc.

 

Incidentally - don't tender drives have traction tyres? I can't think of one that doesn't..

 

Regards

 

Roy

 

I have a feeling the running plate on that EP may be metal, the sheen on its surface is different to the moulded plastic parts, but it is only a feeling and some of the bends towards the cab look more like moulded plastic. We'll find out when they arrive I suppose.

 

Re the tender traction tyres, I have plenty of non tyred axles which is my initial plan. But yes, replacing tyres on a coupled wheelset is less straightforward than it is on a tender drive unit. I have to say I have come to loathe the 5MT, having to refit tyres and get them concentric so that the locomotive doesn't develop a pronounced wobble is a pain in the proverbial, to the point it became the deciding factor in buying a Duchess or not. The goal is 50 wagons, the WD I have manages 40-45, and a Black 5 I have that I tested without tyred wheelsets managed 20. As long as a non traction tyred 8F manages 30 then it'll be happy days, most will be happy with that level of performance and I know I'll be able to get what I need out of them. To be honest, if I went the traction tyred tender route I'd expect the hybrid I'm intending on creating to be able to take over 60 even if the base model has 4F levels of haulage. My main drive is the Revolution class B tankers, a train of 20 is a very draggy thing indeed, I tested it as equating to around 50 16t mineral wagons.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • RMweb Gold

The running plate is diecast.

post-1467-0-62651400-1543171256_thumb.jpeg

I think I might have mentioned once or twice that I’m not a fan of traction tyres, so It’ll do for me!

Tom.

Edited by TomE
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Can anyone confirm that this will be a coreless motor drive in the loco and tender to house the decoder?

 

I can't speak for Bachmann but I cannot conceive of a situation where they would regress from recent coreless motor loco-drive chassis, and that the running plate (mentioned above) is to be cast metal only confirms that. There is to be a sound version so inevitably the chip will be in the tender with room for a speaker.

 

Regards

 

Roy

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a feeling the running plate on that EP may be metal, the sheen on its surface is different to the moulded plastic parts, but it is only a feeling and some of the bends towards the cab look more like moulded plastic. We'll find out when they arrive I suppose.

 

Re the tender traction tyres, I have plenty of non tyred axles which is my initial plan. But yes, replacing tyres on a coupled wheelset is less straightforward than it is on a tender drive unit. I have to say I have come to loathe the 5MT, having to refit tyres and get them concentric so that the locomotive doesn't develop a pronounced wobble is a pain in the proverbial, to the point it became the deciding factor in buying a Duchess or not. The goal is 50 wagons, the WD I have manages 40-45, and a Black 5 I have that I tested without tyred wheelsets managed 20. As long as a non traction tyred 8F manages 30 then it'll be happy days, most will be happy with that level of performance and I know I'll be able to get what I need out of them. To be honest, if I went the traction tyred tender route I'd expect the hybrid I'm intending on creating to be able to take over 60 even if the base model has 4F levels of haulage. My main drive is the Revolution class B tankers, a train of 20 is a very draggy thing indeed, I tested it as equating to around 50 16t mineral wagons.

 

Would that my WDs were anything like that strong. The best can manage 6 bogie bolsters or 10 empty sulphate wagons.  The weakest manages three bogie bolsters.  Against that my 2MT 2-6-0 will walk off with over 20 carriages, and the prototype of that had the reputation in the Darlington area of not being able to pull the skin off a rice pudding.  I use Union Mills 0-6-0s on the heaviest unfitted freight, or Dapol B1s, and Dapol A3s for the big fast freights.

 

Shame 8Fs didn't really get into the NE area apart from some late works attention by Darlington after Horwich closed.  That might justify a super-clean one for Croft Spa, running in ex-works.  I just need to find a photo of one ex- Darlington works on one of 51A's WD running-in duties.

 

Les

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.