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coachmann

Is Code 100 still used on "serious" layouts?

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I didn't have any electrical pick up problems with Insulfrog slips while on DC, but they did require careful pinning down to ensure the wheels that could pick up current were actually on the rails while others were on plastic dead spots. With DCC, I would not anticipate any problems with stay-alives covering the dead issues.

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With DCC, I would not anticipate any problems with stay-alives covering the dead issues.

Some of my locos are too small for stay-alives to fit, unfortunately.

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Grantham, the Streamliner Years uses Code 100 and no one seems to give any adverse comments on it. Red Leader has curved points, slips etc to make prototypical track formations. It is all ballasted using foam underlay on the main running lines and then ballast on the yards, and ballast to make the foam on the main lines more realistic.

 

Baz

 

Sorry - missed this first time round. As has been already mentioned, we make use of Code 100. I think we're 'serious', in the way the OP mentions?

 

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post-16151-0-41068800-1533906735_thumb.jpg

 

post-16151-0-99802300-1533906807.jpg

 

To emphasise a couple of points (ha!) made by others. Code 100 is more resilient to the rough and tumble of the exhibition circuit. Painting the rail sides makes a huge difference in terms of toning down and blending in the larger size of the rail. And laying to 45mm track centres helps as well (although that applies equally to Code 75).

 

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All that having been said, Shap is laid on Code 75 (concrete)! To some extent a bit of a try out (there's nowhere near as much track). Only comment for now is that it takes more care to lay even and true as the smaller section makes it more susceptible to knocks, kinks, undulations, etc. It's only been to one show so far so we'll have to see how it fares in terms of durability.

 

(All photos courtesy of Tony Wright)

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Yours is a serious layout in my book LNER 4479. Your comments about Shap, which uses Code 75, interest me, and I second that it takes more care to lay even and true as the smaller section makes it more susceptible to knocks, kinks, undulations. Peco bullhead demands even more care and is easily damaged just be putting two sections together with Code 75 rail joiners.

 

I am not sure at this stage whether Code 100 will be used in the my layout.  It has certainly delivered ultra-smooth running and it's rigidity is apparent when two pieces of track seem to lock together rather than clip together. 

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Peco bullhead demands even more care and is easily damaged just be putting two sections together with Code 75 rail joiners.

I find that inserting a small screwdriver into the code 75 rail joiner and twisting gently three or four times along the length of the joiner makes them easier to fit on the bullhead rail.

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I recently watched a Youtube video where a chap was unpacking a box of the new Peco Code 75 bullhead track.

 

1 length of track had a lot of the sleepers detached from the rails and another length of track was so badly bent as to render it virtually unusable. He was most dissapointed to say the least!

 

 I'll be sticking with  Peco Code 100 for my next layout. It's bulletproof!

 

 

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Edited by Alcanman
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I find that inserting a small screwdriver into the code 75 rail joiner and twisting gently three or four times along the length of the joiner makes them easier to fit on the bullhead rail.

I picked that up earlier Budgie and adopted it. It works out well. Thanks.

Edited by coachmann

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Late to the party as usual, but if I could just throw my twopenn'th in here I've just finished laying a garage-sized layout in all code 75 and really wished I'd used 100!  I lost so many lengths of flexi due to the rails pulling out of the sleepers and not being able to re-thread them back in again, and the slighest baseboard undulations have proved problematic and it has taken weeks of fiddling about packing and re-laying points particularly due to poor running/derailments etc... It also seems the case that even the newest locos (with properly gapped wheels) sometimes have an issue with the catch rails on 75 points, especially the curved ones (of which I laid 8) and often the front wheels jump when crossing them as the flanges catch the inside rail.  Oddly enough, the best runner on the layout is an old Bachmann/Mainline-reissue Class 46 which purrs over everything unhindered whilst the front pony wheels on a new Fairburn jump every time...

 

Ah well, you live and learn...!

 

David

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I have some agreement with the above. Code 100 really does give meaning to the words 'Permanent Way'. I have enjoyed the smoothest passage ever through pointwork ever since relaying Carrog with Code 100, but unfortunately for me, I used Peco bullhead first and I cannot get away from the fact that bullhead looks so much better.

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Tough and reliable, but as Coach says perhaps not quite realistic

I have some agreement with the above. Code 100 really does give meaning to the words 'Permanent Way'. I have enjoyed the smoothest passage ever through pointwork ever since relaying Carrog with Code 100, but unfortunately for me, I used Peco bullhead first and I cannot get away from the fact that bullhead looks so much better.

 

Just a reminder, Code 100 pinned directy to MDF and ballasted at a later date.

 

http://youtu.be/EOhMFH9qU30

 

Not a bad send up for Heljan's 47xx?

 

Cheers Ray

Edited by Silver Sidelines
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Thanks for posting the video. That is some large layout there Ray. Good track laying in whatever code is the key in the end. The Heljan 47XX is a heavy beast for a plastic RTR model and it was scary listening to it bump over some of my more dodgy pointwork before the Code 100 relay. You have got plenty of space there for long trains. It would have been interesting to see them negotiating the curved part of those Peco slips.

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Thanks Coach

 

I had forgotten about the 'single slip'!

 

It would have been interesting to see them negotiating the curved part of those Peco slips.

The layout was built with a 'dead frog / Insulfrog' diamond crossing. Some engines would always hesitate or stall and I alighted on the idea of swapping in a single slip which has less plastic and I think offers better electrical continuity.

 

There is a Post all about it back here.

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/blog/880/entry-7487-diamond-crossing-or-single-slip/

 

Although the Slip is fully wired up it is not used as the effective radius must be something approaching 24 inch and not suitable for close coupled coaches - never mind eight coupled engines!

 

http://youtu.be/cNp-OMFT0n8

 

Cheers Ray

Edited by Silver Sidelines
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Thanks for taking the trouble Ray. The sharp LH or RH turn on 2' radius slips has been an irritant with me for years and it looks like a bullhead slip could be the same radius. However, we are where we are and Peco turnouts are mighty convenient for me seeing as 'electrics' is one of those parts of this hobby that I avoid nowadays. Two Insulfrog single slips will be on Ruabon. Great minds think alike, as I used a single slip in place of a diamond at the double junction at Greenfield Junction.

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I use Code 100 only for storage sidings now. Went with Marcways recently building my own turnouts.

 

I’m starting a new exhibition layout shortly and will probably go down the Peco Bullhead route. Looks so much better. I will use code 100 for the sidings as you can pick up good second hand points for a few quid.

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That's interesting....

 

I've been steadily amassing track & point stock for my intended layout. The layout calls for 3-4 single slips. All in code 75 

 

No tender locomotives, just 56xx's & panniers, oh, and a 42xx or two. All coal wagons, plus 2 B-sets.

 

Sticky wicket?

 

Cheers,

 

Ian.

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