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Hi All,

 

Following on my vein of modelling individual industrial locos which are true to a particular works number/name and era, I am currently building a model of this industrial locomotive:

 

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Avonside 1972 of 1927 "STAMFORD"

Built in 1927 by the Avonside Engine Company in Bristol, works number 1972 STAMFORD was one of eight locomotives (four now preserved) which worked at Pilton Ironstone Quarries in Rutland. For those who are not familiar with this industry, several quarries followed a seam of iron ore which extended from Oxfordshire to south Lincolnshire in the first half of the twentieth century. The quarries were owned by a range of different operators, and each had its own unique character and array of locomotive designs.

 

Tweaked for industry

Of unusual note for an Avonside B4 class design, STAMFORD had an open-backed cab from new.

 

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This was so that she could deputise for AE1918/23 CRANFORD at Cranford Quarries in Northamptonshire, where a former narrow-gauge tunnel on the system meant that the only way for crew to depart the loco in the event of emergency was to climb out over the bunker. Enthusiasts will note that AE1918/23 CRANFORD is in fact a different loco from that which is preserved and currently in operational condition, this being AE1919/24 CRANFORD. This loco inherited the nameplates when the original loco was deemed beyond economic repair and has a typical Avonside close-backed cab. A photograph of the original CRANFORD AE1918/23 can be found here, note the open-backed cab similar to STAMFORD:

 

Preservation

The prototype loco STAMFORD currently resides at Rocks by Rail (formerly Rutland Railway Museum) at Cottesmore. After several decades of outdoor display at various sites she is finally under cover and at home in the county where she worked, alongside two other ironstone quarry locos from the county and several more from Leicestershire and Northamptonshire in the three-road Simon Layfield Exhibition Centre. Currently she is seated on two driving wheels due to a serious crack in the centre wheelset hornguide. I am sure the museum would welcome anyone who would like to assist in her cosmetic restoration.

 

The Model

My model (already well underway) will be constructed using the CSP/Agenoria etched brass/NS kit as a basis and will feature modifications to the smokebox, buffer beams and cab - supplemented by etches from my own artwork (already to hand). The basic cab is shown below. 

 

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It is largely to be the same affair as my Manning Wardle DOLOBRAN – 00 gauge, Markits wheels, High Level Gearbox, Mashima can motor mounted horizontally in the boiler complete with brass flywheel.

 

The goal is to pair this model of STAMFORD with my another Pilton Quarries loco named WB2629/41 STAVELEY, constructed from my Bagnall 0-6-0ST etches which have previously featured on RMweb. 

 

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I have many more images of STAMFORD which I cannot post due to copyright, but will happily exchange them via PM with anyone wishing to see more. If anyone has any image of Pilton Quarries they are willing to share, those would also be welcome. I would welcome any photographs of WB2629/41 in particular.

 

Paul A.

 

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Hi All,

 

The Agenoria kit provides most of the parts for this build. The rear of the cab etches were used for the distinctive flared bunker. 

 

post-5089-0-92094400-1531520439_thumb.jpg

 

The addition of the cab etch and a piece of flat sheet for the roof gives this pleasing silhouette, which will be completed with wire for rain strips and beading etc. 

 

post-5089-0-38979800-1531520783_thumb.jpg

 

That's all for now. 

 

Paul A. 

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theres ex pitsford ironstone avonside at Elsecar, near barnsley

 

named Earl of fitzwilliam since its lived there, its been out of use for a long time but they're slowly raising funds to restore it

http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/3144318

 

Yes - sadly one of the nameplates from AE1917/23 PITSFORD went through auction 2/3 years ago so now unlikely to be reunited with her. 

 

Another Avonside from the ironstone industry is AE2068/33 ROBERT which has been plinthed at Stratford Station. I believe she is the youngest standard gauge Avonside to have been preserved, as the company halted production in 1934. Spares for the locos were latterly available from Hunslets, which was a fair distance from Bristol!

 

Paul A. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi All, 

 

Here's a couple of shots of the completed cab and the model ready for the paint shop. The backhead and handbrake will be slipped in after painting, along with Narrow Planet nameplates/worksplates. 

 

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Those in the know will note that I've omitted the dump buffers which she had in her early life. These were fitted inside the conventional buffers and were necessary for handling the ship canal type wagons used in the early years for calcining the ore. These covered the rows of bolts seen in the below photo. 

 

post-5089-0-96504000-1532370201_thumb.jpg

 

That's all for now folks. 

 

Paul A. 

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Pilton was a fascinating system and claimed what was probably a unique civil engineering structure at least as far as industrial lines are concerned, in the form of a bridge which carried a crossroads over the railway, the line passing diagonally under the centre of the crossroads. It still exists and can be seen for anyone who fancies some industrial archeology.

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  • 11 months later...

Hi All, 

 

I ought to get better at updating ongoing projects on here...

 

Current state of play sees the model 95% finished. Details to pick out with a fine paintbrush in black, matt varnish to be applied to smokebox and then the cab interior and crew/coal to pop in. Those axle ends will need painting too and I have a nice Markits whistle to set it off. 

 

I've omitted the clack valves until I'm 100% happy with the running as they foul the mechanism/boiler barrel assembly when sliding it into the body. 

 

230860482_StamfordAvonsidePiltonpartbuilt.jpg.179cccb1ec9b340de4c46bc96221144e.jpg

 

Happily the 15''Bagnall some posts above is also nearing the finishing line.

 

Cheers

Paul A. 

 

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The B4 class avonside was once described as looking like an elephant on roller skates due to the small wheels under such a high sitting boiler and tank. A very apt description I feel. :D

 

Yours is looking good.

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That's a great looking loco - I built this kit years ago, so fond memories. I also see 'Robert' in Stratford sometimes - a singularly inappropriate location I would say, using a Bristol built industrial to illustrate Stratford's proud loco building heritage! It's a shame she (he?) isn't on a proper line somewhere.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/07/2019 at 09:40, Barclay said:

That's a great looking loco - I built this kit years ago, so fond memories. I also see 'Robert' in Stratford sometimes - a singularly inappropriate location I would say, using a Bristol built industrial to illustrate Stratford's proud loco building heritage! It's a shame she (he?) isn't on a proper line somewhere.

 

Yes, the kit goes together well - the ride height is a little questionable though. I think it has been designed around 14mm drivers in error - the kit instructions of course state the correct 12mm. I did raise the footplate a few thou' on my other Agenoria B4 with some plasticard between the frames and footplate. On this one though I have raised the buffers above their intended position by a few thou to compensate. 

 

Only a handful of jobs left now - coal, crew, matt coating for the smokebox and the mechanical lubricator wheel needs to be red too. 

 

1321067059_StamfordAvonsidemodelpiltonironstoneindustrial.jpg.0542e6ceea62ec58ad6539bfcf42db59.jpg

 

Paul A. 

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Hi All,

 

That's it - done, finished. Photographed below with my model of Avonside AE1919/24 CRANFORD. Differences are hopefully apparent versus the way the kit is intended to go together.

 

294050664_StamfordandCranfordAvonsides.jpg.00db9631988bf3ae3bf9ce9c7bed642f.jpg

 

Don't worry - the Dart Castings crew have had their grease top caps filed down to flat caps...

 

I have a three of the basic side and front etches for the STAMFORD style open-backed cab spare (1 in brass, 2 in thicker N/S).  If anyone would like one please PM me, proceeds to go to Rocks by Rail at Cottesmore. 

 

What's next? Something a little more modern from north of the border:

 

483499357_barclay060.jpg.5083ac8f14ce9478fd26d9729724a55b.jpg

 

 

Paul A. 

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Did the prototype of the black one ever work at Staveley iron works? It's just that the smokebox door looks like that fitted to many of that company's engines, presumably made in their own workshops.

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21 hours ago, Ruston said:

Did the prototype of the black one ever work at Staveley iron works? It's just that the smokebox door looks like that fitted to many of that company's engines, presumably made in their own workshops.

 

Yes Dave, spot on - the loco was overhauled there.

 

She carried the name "Avonside № 3" at that time. 

 

Paul A. 

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Paul I have just caught up with you build thread of the ironstone avonside. The etched kits do look really good and you have done a marvellous job on building your loco.

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  • 1 year later...

Hi All, 

 

Some fantastic news regarding the future of Avonside 1972 of 1927 - please see press release below

 

Help us to keep historic ironstone quarry locomotive in Rutland

Standard gauge steam locomotive named “STAMFORD” currently resides, on loan, within the exhibition centre at Rocks by Rail – the Living Ironstone Museum based near Cottesmore in Rutland.  

 

This locomotive was built by the Avonside Engine Co. in Bristol in 1927 and spent all of its working life at the Staveley Minerals Ironstone Quarry railway at Pilton, Rutland. Furthermore, it is the only unrestored 0-6-0 steam locomotive from a Rutland ironstone quarry.  

 

The locomotive’s owners, the Bluebell Railway PLC,  have now agreed to transfer ownership of the locomotive to the Museum so that it can remain in Rutland, not far from the ironstone quarry in which it was once in daily use. The Museum is now raising funds to purchase the locomotive with a view to rapid reassembly and conservation of this historic locomotive as an educational museum exhibit. 

 

How you can support

 

The Museum would welcome any assistance and donations in the furtherance of this project. Any donations by way of cheques should marked on rear “Stamford Loco Appeal” and be made out to Rutland Railway Museum and sent to: 

 

Mr A Salmon, RbR Treasurer, 4 Main Street, Stanford on Soar, Loughborough  LE12 5PY 

For donors willing to donate as Gift Aid there is an RbR Gift Aid Form which is available via email from the Curator   email: Curator (at) rocks-by-rail.org 

 

For donors wanting to make their gift by bank transfer please contact the Treasurer for these details on email andysam (at) stayfree.co.uk

 

Rocks by Rail - The Living Ironstone Museum, Cottesmore Iron Ore Mines Sidings, Ashwell Road, Cottesmore, Rutland LE15 7FF        Tel: 01572 868415    

 

Rocks by Rail is the trading name of Rutland Railway Museum -     Registered Charity No 1115462

 

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Thanks all

 

Paul A. 

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  • 3 months later...

Hi All,

 

Just a quick update to this thread - work is now progressing on a further six coupled Avonside loco. 

 

The appropriately named Avonside "Pilton" No.1832 of 1919  worked alongside AE 1972 "Stamford" until closure in 1969. This loco was of similar outline but with some detail differences including conventional cab, dumb buffers, three-part tank wrapper, steel cab floor, different front hand rail arrangement, earlier-style sandboxes etc. 

 

Of particular note is the safety valve/cover arrangement, which was of the earlier type seen on the curved-tank B4 class examples (but a little flatter). The profile of this fitting is a bit of pain in model form and as such I haven't attached this one permanently... it can hopefully be improved upon...

 

This will complete the trio of locos which operated at Pilton from WW2 to the closure of the quarries in 1969. 

 

 _20210414_195033.JPG.b14338b1e65f6d7e8e62cf8b2927a6d3.JPG

 

Paul A. 

 

PS. I am told the the Stamford loco appeal (details as above) is seeing encouraging progress. Please donate if you'd like to help preserve a sizeable piece of unique quarry railway heritage :) Ev'ry little helps as they say...

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