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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

 

I'm sure you won't but don't fall into the trap that a lot of modellers seem to and put a tank on that wagon. The majority of WW2 tanks weigh between thirty and sixty tons. Steamrollers are generally between ten and twenty tons. A big mystery machine crate with the name of one of the old engineering companies such as British Thompson Houston or Wildt Mellor Bromley stencilled on the side is a safe (and cheap!!) bet!


It won’t be a tank as the layout is set between 1930-1940 and the Loriot L only had a 15 ton capacity so I’m planning on it having some form of farming machinery or a tractor, small loco boiler or just a stacked pile of sleepers

 

The Bachmann tarpaulin load looks quite good but that’s too easy :lol:

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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Posted (edited)

I thought something like this would be appropriate

 

58AB7657-F501-4F36-B2F4-FB930D49C36B.jpeg.23b49d88b7539419205d73384314db86.jpeg

 

or

 

332B85DB-4260-4EFB-94E0-C9624E0A0E3F.jpeg.1fc66403e293458590ba55bd0e6a5e89.jpeg

or

 

6C4097B8-46FA-416B-A9C6-99192205CCC7.jpeg.eba4a7dfc4d6a7991a96a8a7d59dffb9.jpeg
 

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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The plough is of the type hauled by steam ploughing engines, so fine for prewar. Weighs about five tons. The tractor is a Fordson Major from 1950-62, so would be out of time. I have no idea why it is grey, should be blue. Worked on and drove some very tired ones as a teenager, truly horrible!

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Most model tractors a available apart from the Fordson model F or Model N on steel " spade lug" wheels are post WW2. Same goes for combine harvesters and balers. 

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, MrWolf said:

The plough is of the type hauled by steam ploughing engines, so fine for prewar. Weighs about five tons. The tractor is a Fordson Major from 1950-62, so would be out of time. I have no idea why it is grey, should be blue. Worked on and drove some very tired ones as a teenager, truly horrible!

 

first choice would be the traction engine because but it probably weighs over 15 ton


Thanks for the info regarding the tractor. it doesn’t actually say what model it is or the date of manufacture so I wouldn’t have known unless you had said


but they do a blue one

1C318F1B-E0A9-49AE-8AB6-751112C96668.jpeg.9872b945c8ff7cca95768205a4ce866b.jpeg

 

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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Sorry about being an anorak there, but you know what will happen five minutes after you fix something anachronistic to the layout! :scratchhead:

 

I seem to have gathered knowledge about obscure and or useless things since I was very young. People used to assume I would be good at pub quizzes. I know precisely zip about television, celebrities, pop music or ball sports. 

I'm rather proud of it too...

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My mates dad still had a Fordson Major running on his farm in the mid 70s. It was great to drive although the seat was a bit hard on the backside and the clutch was a bit of a beast. Harvest time was great fun. The old man drove the Class combine, Steve drove the Massey tractor and I drove the Fordson. I was 15, my mate Steve was 16. Wouldn't happen now coz of elf and safety. Back then we were driving tractors around the farm at 14. Ah the good old days. Oh lord that was 45 years ago where did all the time go?

Regards Lez.  

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3 hours ago, lezz01 said:

My mates dad still had a Fordson Major running on his farm in the mid 70s. It was great to drive although the seat was a bit hard on the backside and the clutch was a bit of a beast. Harvest time was great fun. The old man drove the Class combine, Steve drove the Massey tractor and I drove the Fordson. I was 15, my mate Steve was 16. Wouldn't happen now coz of elf and safety. Back then we were driving tractors around the farm at 14. Ah the good old days. Oh lord that was 45 years ago where did all the time go?

Regards Lez.  

I learned to drive a tractor when I was 13, on a farm in France.

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Here we have a good example of the theory of six degrees of separation. Talk about half a dozen random subjects with anyone and you find some common ground. I too learnt to drive a tractor at 13, though nowhere as stylish as France back around 1982. Wot? No brakes?

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The traction engine is a Fowler ploughing engine. It dates to around 1918, though they were in use well into the 30s and 40s. They often ended up pulling up trees in their later years. Weight wise, you would just about get away with it. A big old beast but not as heavy as the big road rollers that tip the scales at 20 tons. IIRC, there were no new road locomotives built after about 1925.

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10 hours ago, MrWolf said:

The plough is of the type hauled by steam ploughing engines, so fine for prewar. Weighs about five tons. The tractor is a Fordson Major from 1950-62, so would be out of time. I have no idea why it is grey, should be blue. Worked on and drove some very tired ones as a teenager, truly horrible!

Another vote here for the Fordson Major not being suitable for your layout, and being a horrible tractor.  I used to drive a Power Major in my teens.  It had a front end loader and used to leak hydraulic oil every where.  It never seemed to have much guts compared to the David Browns.  Quite liked the Ford Dexta though.      

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I’ve had a quick look for a period correct tractor will little success so I thinking of going for the plough

 

Being the shape it is means it would need wooden blocks/sleepers at each end to level it up and there’s plenty of areas to attach chains etc so personally I think that would be a little more interesting

 

 

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I have to agree that would make an Interesting load, lots of things going on with it. Importantly, it's not too heavy and will be within the loading gauge if propped and lashed level. If the packing either end is quite tall, you would need to build a "crib" of sleepers. Think Jenga or one of Colonel Stephens water towers. It would most likely be secondhand by the 1930s, so a bit of weathering and don't bother sheeting it down, shame to hide all that detail anyway!

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I hoped to finish my AA6 this weekend but I’ve still not received my transfers and the postie has already been

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I have similar problems with a number of projects at the moment. It's our own fault, we walk out own path. If we were mainstream, we could show off to everyone else whether they care or not about how well we are doing during lockdown.

As my friend Woodstock defined the social media competitive coping: "Check out MY chutney!"

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Posted (edited)

I’ve just uploaded the revised drawing to Shapeways and their prices have gone up 40%

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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12 minutes ago, chuffinghell said:

I’ve just uploaded the revised drawing to Shapeways and their prices have gone up 40%

 

 

Bloody hell, that's taking the Michael a bit!

 

Al.

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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, Alister_G said:

 

Bloody hell, that's taking the Michael a bit!

 

Al.


Just a bit, yesterday my Loriot was £40 today it’s £56

 

At first I thought it was because I’d added stiffening ribs to the underside but the previously one ordered and those in my ‘shop’ have also increased by 40%

 

I’m hoping it’s a software glitch (ie the exchange rate the wrong round) if not I doubt they’ll be getting any further business from me and quite a lot of others

 

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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Hope that price was a glitch and you can get your wagon. I recon the plough would make a good load.

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I'm still trying to decide on a load for the N-gauge Loriot I have. 

 

Have you considered a Scammell trailer?   Could be a little different.

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6 hours ago, AlfaZagato said:

I'm still trying to decide on a load for the N-gauge Loriot I have. 

 

Have you considered a Scammell trailer?   Could be a little different.


that’s a idea because I do have a couple of spare Scammell trailers

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15 hours ago, Alister_G said:

 

Bloody hell, that's taking the Michael a bit!

 

Al.

 
prices are all back to normal* this morning some pillock must have entered in the exchange rate wrong

 

*still extortionate though

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Chris,

 

The traction engine that you illustrated above is a ploughing engine. The were among the heaviest of traction engines. They normally worked in pairs hauling the type of plough that you show back and forth between them. The cable drum being mounted under the boiler meant they were very long beasts.

 

I dug out my copy of Steam on the Farm by Jonathan Brown. He says the lightest were 17 tons. There are others at 22 tons plus. In reality they were always driven from job to job in a land train along the road rather than by rail. Apparently Tom Rolt worked for Bomfords who were ploughing and drainage contractors. Tom recalled that the true weight of the engines used by Bomfords was a closely guarded secret. When in public the engines had to carry a plate stating their weight but Tom said they all carried 14 Ton plates!

 

Ian.

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24 minutes ago, Ian Major said:

Chris,

 

The traction engine that you illustrated above is a ploughing engine. The were among the heaviest of traction engines. They normally worked in pairs hauling the type of plough that you show back and forth between them. The cable drum being mounted under the boiler meant they were very long beasts.

 

I dug out my copy of Steam on the Farm by Jonathan Brown. He says the lightest were 17 tons. There are others at 22 tons plus. In reality they were always driven from job to job in a land train along the road rather than by rail. Apparently Tom Rolt worked for Bomfords who were ploughing and drainage contractors. Tom recalled that the true weight of the engines used by Bomfords was a closely guarded secret. When in public the engines had to carry a plate stating their weight but Tom said they all carried 14 Ton plates!

 

Ian.


Thanks Ian

 

Very informative and useful

 

Chris

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Posted (edited)

Chris,

 

As an aside you may be interested in this video of the pair of Fowler BB1s  ploughing with a 6 furrow balance plough.  It's hard work! Takes me back to my ploughing days.:)

 

 

 

 

Ian.

Edited by Ian Major
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