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11 hours ago, chuffinghell said:

My intention is to make it appear that the track exits the tunnel straight, however due to space (or lack there of) I’ve had to compromise.

 

example:

 

If the tunnel mouth is too far back it becomes clear that the line curves on entering/exiting the tunnel


43260023-4DB9-4DE7-9218-FD41114AACFA.jpeg.2b4d3ca3a9958aeb7eece63127b6a660.jpeg

 

Moving the tunnel mouth four inches towards the black line lessens this effect

 

0DA9E392-1CEA-4264-A25C-147456818A8D.jpeg.008ae35e81d3541ce6bdb6f65f61bfb8.jpeg

 

However I cannot move the tunnel mouth any further away from the curve otherwise my longest loco would enter the tunnel on the runaround loop

 

6412B65B-4377-4A90-A543-98CC66EEE082.jpeg.aa2040c48d8a5cb2390e1ed5ccbd06b4.jpeg

 

Only just fits

 

I've lost track (pun intended) here. Is that the 4th radius curve or the 2nd radius? If it's the 2nd, I agree that there's not much else you can do but if it's the 4th, then going back to the 2nd will give you a bit more straight track to play with.

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I think what you need to do is take a step back and imagine what the area looked like before the railway arrived.

On my own layout I designed the scenery first and then pushed a railway through it.

Remember tunnels where expensive things to construct and where normally only done as a last resort, cuttings where used wherever possible, or even the route changed to miss some problem or other.

Have you considered a wooded cutting using the curve as part of the seen layout disappearing under a road bridge (for example) as the view blocker.

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6 hours ago, St Enodoc said:

I've lost track (pun intended) here. Is that the 4th radius curve or the 2nd radius? If it's the 2nd, I agree that there's not much else you can do but if it's the 4th, then going back to the 2nd will give you a bit more straight track to play with.


It’s the 2nd radius in the photo so that’s the best I could do

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3 hours ago, KNP said:

I think what you need to do is take a step back and imagine what the area looked like before the railway arrived.

On my own layout I designed the scenery first and then pushed a railway through it.

Remember tunnels where expensive things to construct and where normally only done as a last resort, cuttings where used wherever possible, or even the route changed to miss some problem or other.

Have you considered a wooded cutting using the curve as part of the seen layout disappearing under a road bridge (for example) as the view blocker.


I admit that beyond this....


D8258BB5-02E4-40FD-99E5-BE8B211DDB21.jpeg.f94d8f0419e5128b8c81851812a95c4d.jpeg

 

.... I’m a bit stuck

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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trees.docx

Maybe adding a small copse (consisting of fairly tall trees) leading up to the tunnel would mask the view enough to help disguise that the track was on the curve on entering thetrees.docx tunnel?

Might only need 2 or 3 larger trees placed strategically in line of sight of the curve. I stole your diagram and placed some silly trees on it to try and explain, thats the limit of my draughtsman ability :unsure:

 

Mark.

Edited by MAP66
Oops, diagram didn't upload.
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Chris

 

What I am thinking about is on these lines.

I've done a quick sketch to show my line of thought, not the definitive answer but you never know it might provide the spark to get that old brain box thinking...

The track is concealed from view and just disappears behind the tree lined cutting, here I would use some large trees to get the effect.

The area now looks like a wooded hill that the railway has cut through at a lower level and the road bridge providing the view blocker as the train heads off into the distance.

As a plus you now have a vehicular entrance to the goods yard.

 

 

IMG_2062.jpg.a9c93718c9fd3fe6dba01437fc486048.jpg

 

Remember....

From little seeds mighty oaks do grow.

From this little sketch the mighty answer might evolve!

 

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I must admit that I thought about trees atop a deep cutting, but I didn't want to overwhelm you with ideas. Making trees is work, but enjoyable if you have a batch product. As the cutting on the inside of the curve is unseen once you are halfway round, that side could be almost vertical. I felt a scribble coming on, but KNP has beat me to it!

Edited by MrWolf
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Nice sketch by the way Kevin, it looks very believable. In fact, it puts me very much in mind of the bridge and entrance to the yard at Kinnerley on the Shropshire & Montgomeryshire Railway. (Minus tin sheds and wreckage of course!)

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2 minutes ago, KNP said:

Chris

 

What I am thinking about is on these lines.

I've done a quick sketch to show my line of thought, not the definitive answer but you never know it might provide the spark to get that old brain box thinking...

The track is concealed from view and just disappears behind the tree lined cutting, here I would use some large trees to get the effect.

The area now looks like a wooded hill that the railway has cut through at a lower level and the road bridge providing the view blocker as the train heads off into the distance.

As a plus you now have a vehicular entrance to the goods yard.

 

 

IMG_2062.jpg.a9c93718c9fd3fe6dba01437fc486048.jpg

 

Remember....

From little seeds mighty oaks do grow.

From this little sketch the mighty answer might evolve!

 

 

I think that would have to be, at least partly, a rock-sided cutting for two reasons: Banks take up a lot of space and in the real world they were kept clear of trees.

 

You could possibly also attempt the neat visual trick of continuing the cutting towards the backscene so that the line of the track appears to be straighter than it really is. Maybe put some dummy track in the bottom! (But you then need to disguise the junction of the cutting with the backscene somehow.)

 

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Good point Harlequin, vertical rock cuttings aren't all that rare on UK branchlines. Two very deep ones spring to mind where the MR and LDECR lines ran through Clowne and Cresswell in Derbyshire.

Edited by MrWolf
Stupid autocorrect
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I admit that I’m not keen on having visible curves but only because the radius I’m stuck with is too sharp to be realistic looking

 

A friend is sorting me out some kingspan off cuts so I can at least have a ‘play’

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42 minutes ago, chuffinghell said:

I admit that I’m not keen on having visible curves but only because the radius I’m stuck with is too sharp to be realistic looking

 

A friend is sorting me out some kingspan off cuts so I can at least have a ‘play’

True, but think about it from the photographic angle.

Camera set up at track level at the station looking down the line and it curves off to the right and just disappears.

At roof level over the goods shed the train will just vanish from view.

We always look at our model railways from an aerial perspective, bend zee knees and look at it from say first floor window height - whole different viewpoint.

 

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38 minutes ago, KNP said:

True, but think about it from the photographic angle.

Camera set up at track level at the station looking down the line and it curves off to the right and just disappears.

At roof level over the goods shed the train will just vanish from view.

We always look at our model railways from an aerial perspective, bend zee knees and look at it from say first floor window height - whole different viewpoint.

 

 

Well said, I built mine 48" off the floor so that whilst I can get at it to work on it (it's only 24" wide) when it's finished, I can run and view it from a chair. The other, equally important reason is that the room is long and narrow and we don't have much storage space, so I built underneath it and whilst it isn't exactly a subtle feature it is useful. 

I played it smart and gave someone important 80% of the space for her musical instruments, books and clothing overflow. Brownie points ensured! ;)

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Check out Pendon, their mainline in the Vale Scene uses a similar trick that makes it look like the line gently curves one way when in fact it sharply curves the other way. I still believed it even when I was staring at it and knew about it. To help the illusion make the line of trees on either side of the steep sided cutting go in a straight line or gentle curve. If necessary make the actual line go under the trees, another layout, Swiss, called I think Rapperswill, used the trick of a hollow coach and engine shed to hide the true path of the line.

 

I have complete confidence in your ability to come up with a brilliant solution as you have to every other challenge you have set yourself.

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On 19/09/2020 at 11:29, KNP said:

Chris

 

What I am thinking about is on these lines.

I've done a quick sketch to show my line of thought, not the definitive answer but you never know it might provide the spark to get that old brain box thinking...

The track is concealed from view and just disappears behind the tree lined cutting, here I would use some large trees to get the effect.

The area now looks like a wooded hill that the railway has cut through at a lower level and the road bridge providing the view blocker as the train heads off into the distance.

As a plus you now have a vehicular entrance to the goods yard.

 

 

IMG_2062.jpg.a9c93718c9fd3fe6dba01437fc486048.jpg

 

Remember....

From little seeds mighty oaks do grow.

From this little sketch the mighty answer might evolve!

 

 

 

What about something like this as a variation on a theme?

 

ROAD.png.acc5da7a311329c4189997f51259ec22.png

 

Gives access to the goods yard from both over the canal and over the rail or a straight through run for non goods vehicles?

 

Still hides the hideously tight radius curves and hopefully gives the impression of the track exiting Warren in a straight run of track.....through the wall and into my next door neighbours dining room :lol:

 

 

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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5 hours ago, chuffinghell said:

What about something like this as a variation on a theme?

 

I like that. I think it looks good and achieves what you wanted.

 

Al.

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6 hours ago, chuffinghell said:

 

 

What about something like this as a variation on a theme?

 

ROAD.png.acc5da7a311329c4189997f51259ec22.png

 

Gives access to the goods yard from both over the canal and over the rail or a straight through run for non goods vehicles?

 

Still hides the hideously tight radius curves and hopefully gives the impression of the track exiting Warren in a straight run of track.....through the wall and into my next door neighbours dining room :lol:

 

 

 

Like it:good:

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On 18/09/2020 at 15:21, chuffinghell said:

However I cannot move the tunnel mouth any further away from the curve otherwise my longest loco would enter the tunnel on the runaround loop

 

6412B65B-4377-4A90-A543-98CC66EEE082.jpeg.aa2040c48d8a5cb2390e1ed5ccbd06b4.jpeg

 

Only just fits

 

 

Nothing wrong with the loco entering the tunnel to run around - see Ventnor, IOW as an example...

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