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  • RMweb Gold
3 hours ago, Alister_G said:

It might do, try it on one.

 

Al.

 

1 hour ago, Rowsley17D said:

I'd try the acetone sparingly first. The cement might just gum things up.

 

Sorry Chris, I wasn't clear, I meant try the acetone, not the cement.

 

Al.

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1 minute ago, Alister_G said:

 

 

Sorry Chris, I wasn't clear, I meant try the acetone, not the cement.

 

Al.


Thanks Al, I assumed you meant the acetone.

 

I’ve found another window in the box that had been painted so I’ve stripped off the paint back to bare plastic so I can try it on that one first

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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, Alister_G said:

 

 

Sorry Chris, I wasn't clear, I meant try the acetone, not the cement.

 

Al.


Hi Al

 

Using a little acetone has really helped to remove the ‘fuzzy’ from the back of the windows, thank you for the suggestion....Top tip!

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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  • RMweb Gold
Posted (edited)

I always struggle with windows, I either weather them too much or too little

 

do this look about right? or too much?

 

911ACD2A-EFF9-4C35-ABD2-C11969A4314D.jpeg.eeefd78e51962e571f7b7c923bb6d14a.jpeg
 

49813295-0442-410B-B7FA-1E3046FF661D.jpeg.8d245c3a6ff2225c215514ade5e67494.jpeg
 

 

Edited by chuffinghell
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14 minutes ago, chuffinghell said:

I always struggle with windows, I either weather them too much or too little

 

do this look about right? or too much?

 

911ACD2A-EFF9-4C35-ABD2-C11969A4314D.jpeg.eeefd78e51962e571f7b7c923bb6d14a.jpeg
 

49813295-0442-410B-B7FA-1E3046FF661D.jpeg.8d245c3a6ff2225c215514ade5e67494.jpeg
 

 

Spot on I would say young sir.:good:

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It does look good (honestly, the whole thing looks marvellous!), but as to whether it looks right only your excellent judgement and comparison with the engine shed can tell.

 

I suspect you'll find it bob on :)

 

Cracking stuff as ever Chris, Warren continues to be an inspiration - thank you!

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I think that it looks bang on, especially when you consider the amount of dust that would have been thrown about in a warehouse that had trains running through it and as a result was partly open to the elements.

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  • RMweb Gold
1 hour ago, chuffinghell said:

I always struggle with windows, I either weather them too much or too little

 

do this look about right? or too much?

 

911ACD2A-EFF9-4C35-ABD2-C11969A4314D.jpeg.eeefd78e51962e571f7b7c923bb6d14a.jpeg
 

49813295-0442-410B-B7FA-1E3046FF661D.jpeg.8d245c3a6ff2225c215514ade5e67494.jpeg
 

 

 

Looks bang on, Chris.

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That looks very like a railway building that sits at the bottom of a valley. Lots of damp and soot!

If you'd been able to visit Tetbury on a dull day 20 years ago, you'd know how right it looks.

Edited by MrWolf
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  • RMweb Gold
Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, chuffinghell said:

In the end I weathered them using dark earth, rubbed a bit off with my fingers then dusted over with white to soften it....I wanted them to look like they used to be white 

 

As has been discussed before, a true pure white paint was not readily availabe in the 20s and 30s, so windows would more likely be cream to start with, and would go brown quite quickly due to exposure to the sun and general dirt and grime, so what you have produced is spot on.

 

Al.

Edited by Alister_G
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  • RMweb Gold
1 hour ago, Ponthir28 said:

You only have to weather the glass whenever it’s fitted. Fantastic modelling.

 

As with the engine shed I'll only put glazing behind the windows in the side you view from, otherwise you would see the glazing material on the back of the far windows which I don't think looks particularly good..........if that makes any sense

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9 minutes ago, chuffinghell said:

 

As with the engine shed I'll only put glazing behind the windows in the side you view from, otherwise you would see the glazing material on the back of the far windows which I don't think looks particularly good..........if that makes any sense

What!!! Do you mean your not actually making the frames and then the glass. Most disappointed you Chris. Call yourself a modeller. I really don't know.:no:

 

Sounds like a good plan to me Chris.:D

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You should try this stuff:

 

  image.png.4c68c40ee6ce505b3553c5a53f1ab6d3.png

 

Very good for making small windows.  It will probably cope with gaps up to about 5mm.

Edited by Graham T
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  • RMweb Gold
2 hours ago, Graham T said:

You should try this stuff:

 

  image.png.4c68c40ee6ce505b3553c5a53f1ab6d3.png

 

Very good for making small windows.  It will probably cope with gaps up to about 5mm.


I’ve tried the deluxe materials version (glue n glaze) and I just couldn’t seem to get it to look right

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