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3 hours ago, davidw said:

Whose paint and lining did you use?

I used Halford’s etch primer and ford burgundy red paint. Then modelmaster transfers for the lining and numbers and CCT transfers for the roundels. Then a coat of Halford’s gloss lacquer to seal it on the SK. The lacquer has reacted slightly with the lining on the SK, so on the buffet I put the lacquer on first followed by the transfers and I think that worked better. I like the high gloss finish for the Elizabethan, but probably not suitable for everything.

 

Halford’s bumper grey for the roof and humbrol satin black (after masking) for the valence over the solebar.

 

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Still no corridor connectors to finish the Elizabethan - I think Easter has delayed their dispatch. So I've been finishing off a project I started a good year ago, and then left in a drawer with just the roof to paint - do other people do that sort of thing?!

 

Anyway this is one of the 1957 Mark 1 prototypes. In this case a Mark 1 FO, E3084, built with just six bays of seats rather than the normal seven. The sides are produced by Southern Pride pre-printed on plastic with lining already applied. All that is left to do is apply the number, door furniture and source the rest of the coach. These sides fit directly into an old style Hornby Mk 1 (the type with the two screws through the floor) which can be sourced for a couple of quid. So all I had to do was to build an interior (Southern Pride parts) and detail the roof with the correct vents.

 

121172190_Mk1FOE30842.jpg.060f3703fdd42cde65362cf5009a43c4.jpg27862239_Mk1FOE30843.jpg.ee8e09fed95eb66c067210f595a3d5a1.jpg

It's not the finest quality, but as a quick method for producing an unusual coach, I think it works quite well. I can now form the 0743 York to Kings Cross from 1959 as per the carriage workings (other coaches are RTR except for a Mk 1 BSO built in the same way as E3084 from Southern Pride kits some time ago). I believe this was booked for a York A2/3 which I don't have (yet), so a New England one will have to do instead (please excuse the half complete scenery).

 

Dante_on_0752_YRK.JPG.a59bb9fa4de198896b6efce27e61a0c9.JPG

 

...and just to show that E3084 is actually in the formation!

 

1967682336_Mk1FOE3084.JPG.625ed274f7b3f88193e5f2d72e955ab3.JPG

 

 

 

 

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Whose parentage is the a2/3?

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8 hours ago, davidw said:

Whose parentage is the a2/3?

David,

 

It's a DJH kit. I can't claim any credit for it. I bought it from Rails at Warley 2017. The box says built by M.G.  Jose 2010. 

 

Regards

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)

Thanks I'm enjoying the thread.

Edited by davidw

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The corridor connectors for the Elizabethan coaches finally arrived yesterday and have been fitted. I can't recommend these strongly enough. They are from Fair Price Models (https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/fairpricemodels), you get 12 connectors for £3.99 and they're dead easy to fit. (No connection to the company etc....)

 

So now we can see the whole train running past behind 60013 Dominion of New Zealand. The loco is standard Hornby with a light weathering. The train is based on the 1957 Elizabethan formation which was formed of 10 special Pressure Ventilated Thompson coaches and one Mark 1 on the back. The rear two coaches were from Aberdeen, with the rest from Edinburgh. This was the last year in which the buffet lounge and SK with Ladies Waiting Room ran in the train (although the FK with Ladies Waiting Room lasted a few more years). The formation is:

BG, FW(LRR), RF,RSO,SK,SK,SK(LRR),Buffet Lounge, SK, SK,BCK(Mark 1)

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Despite my best intentions to complete lots of projects I was away in a B&B last week, and that’s a good opportunity to get the soldering iron out and start some new coaches. So I did the sides for four Thompson coaches. From the top we have RF, SO, RK and FO. The SO is from Mousa and the rest are Southern Pride. Firstly in brass

 

B4A41B6B-EE32-43AC-A215-795C5770D0EF.jpeg.531be0539ca894cfb2adc580ed8e6687.jpeg

and then resplendent in BR maroon (aka Ford Burbundy Red).

 

B671EC12-10C6-4492-A9E5-B763FFA22644.jpeg.60a3fa8783b00a3c98f1ddd8d1a63aa1.jpeg

The only problem is that I’m down to two donor vehicles, so I’ll have hope there are some going cheap at the Bluebell Railway swap meet next week.

 

I promise some more completed projects soon!

 

All the best

 

Andy

 

 

Edited by thegreenhowards
Corrected typo
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I've really enjoyed reading this thread, and learnt a lot from your various projects.

 

Use of the brass sides totally transforms the Mk1 Bachmann Thompsons, and as I have a good few may well follow in your footsteps.

 

Interesting that you paint the sides before attaching them to the donor coach, may I ask what adhesive you use? Apologies if you've mentioned this and I've missed it.

 

John.

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25 minutes ago, John Tomlinson said:

I've really enjoyed reading this thread, and learnt a lot from your various projects.

 

Use of the brass sides totally transforms the Mk1 Bachmann Thompsons, and as I have a good few may well follow in your footsteps.

 

Interesting that you paint the sides before attaching them to the donor coach, may I ask what adhesive you use? Apologies if you've mentioned this and I've missed it.

 

John.

 

Thanks for your kind comments John,

 

I don’t always paint first. It depends on the coach and the weather. I don’t think it really matters, painting first saves masking and allows for easier painting on the flat, but it risks mucking the paint up when attaching the side. 

 

I use evostick to attach the sides. Applied to the donor only and adding the sides immediately to allow some time for fine adjustment. I sometimes need to use a bit of cyano to stick a loose section later.

 

I would say that Southern Pride sides on Bachmann donors are one of the easiest of these conversions to do. Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

Andy

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Here is my latest (almost) completed project, a D.198 Gresley steel BG. 

 

7A13802B-8930-4DD2-8B95-010BD15EF5D1.jpeg.c1abe2b990ab2f2bd4ea5a9e5ce3c024.jpeg590E8F5E-94EC-4BF5-8B75-24891138085E.jpeg.08602e6bf1ab2e83b9f10bb1469b34e6.jpeg

 

This is built from Comet sides on a Hornby donor and was started a good year ago. It has been held up because Comet didn’t etch any holes for the door hinges and I’ve been trying to decide whether to bother drilling them all out. In the end I decided that I’d better do the job properly, so I drilled them out with a .5mm drill and then filled in the excess hole with solder as I fixed the hinges. While a bit of a fag, this seems to have worked OK. 

 

Normally with Gresley sides on Hornby donor vehicles, I end up cutting out the whole side, but that creates problems fixing the body onto the chassis, so this time I managed to preserve the fixing hooks on the coach sides which are part of the glazing strips. I think this was only possible because the full brake only has small high windows which meant I could leave much if the glazing glued in place on the donor. This picture shows the first side being glued in place while the second side shows the cutting I did on the donor.

 

3BE2DC28-E884-465D-8867-3C4BAD08327F.jpeg.58c5285ccdb4c952124e1f0c0db5e5a6.jpeg

 

I saw almost finished because it is still riding on Hornby bogies. These represent 8’6” standard bogies as fitted to most Gresley coaches. However, I believe that these BG’s started with 8 foot heavy duty bogies, but that some were changed later in life to 8’6” bogies (I’m not sure whether heavy or standard). If anyone is able to confirm  that would be great, as I’d rather not change the Hornby bogies, if I don’t have to.

 

regards

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)

Andy is that a on one of Hornby's 61' 6" underframes?

Edited by davidw

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On 08/05/2019 at 09:06, davidw said:

Andy is that a on one of Hornby's 61' 6" underframes?

David,

 

Sorry for the the slow response. I used to get notified when someone responded, but that seems to have stopped.

 

Anyway, yes, it’s on a Hornby 61’6” BG under-frame. I used the BG because it has the correct steps under the guard’s door.

 

Regards

 

Andy

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Posted (edited)

Another coach finished from the pile of half completed kits. This is a Thompson BSK(3) made from a Comet kit on a Bachmann donor. Rather like the BG above these sides suffered from a lack of door hinges and, having done the basic door furniture, it had been sitting in the too difficult/ can’t be bothered pile for quite some time (c. 18 months!).

 

Anyway, I finally bit the bullet and drilled out all the hinges which is IMHO worth the effort. The roof on the donor had all the ventilators removed and replaced with white metal versions. This is necessary on these conversions, both because the Bachmann ventilators are rather puny, and because they’re in the wrong place. They should be offset from the centre line over the compartments as in the picture below. I think it’s turned out quite well although the lining could be straighter - there’s always something!

 

6F1415DA-4EBB-41D9-A860-71E447A920CD.jpeg.88a2ef9ccc82dfc26f4530ad5438cdd3.jpeg69989F00-8BCC-4771-B6F6-359C8D17391B.jpeg.a1d4be64601e6dae1552538265d1a401.jpegBB742076-F2A9-40C3-A417-23890B1D8F4F.jpeg.c445f6936fa6ab8630ab7e231ec76144.jpeg

 

It it will probably form part of ‘The Norseman’, but I have some other coaches to build for that, so no action videos as this stage.

 

I’m now down to five coaches, one loco and some Presflo wagons in the queue of stuff started before Christmas and not yet finished which is quite good by my standards.

 

Andy

Edited by thegreenhowards
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11 hours ago, jwealleans said:

 

Ouch!

I’m blaming that on iPad spell checker! Since corrected.

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I was away again at the end of last week, which tends to mean the soldering iron comes out on a new kit. This time it was a D.210 BT/CL twin artic comprised of sides from Mousa, ends from 247 and other bits from MJT and scratch. Here is the progress so far.

 

1293050715_D210CL1.JPG.065a29545ec05518288aa48018de2399.JPG

 

..and the other side with the roof resting on.

 

1098613686_D210CL2.JPG.0880ee5bff85da0d6ea6b22ad9bb9430.JPG

 

The roof (MJT) is currently too high as can be seen in the photo below and I'm not quite sure why. It could be:

a) that the MJT roof is not the correct profile (but this I doubt as they sell it for their 51ft stock);

b) that the 247 ends are not correct profile (but no reason to doubt this);

c) Just a mismatch between different suppliers; or

d) I have mucked something up in putting it all together (most likely!).

 

My plan A is to file off the knobbly bits above what I believe is the ends of the train alarm gear as shown by the white arrow in the photo. This would allow the roof to sit lower down and, I hope, will more or less sort all the gaps. If anyone else has met this problem or has any better ideas, I'd be very grateful.

 

1112050520_D210CL3.JPG.2753cb6fc429110793ad681ccc555e4b.JPG

 

Regards

 

Andy

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On 20/05/2019 at 10:17, thegreenhowards said:

I was away again at the end of last week, which tends to mean the soldering iron comes out on a new kit. This time it was a D.210 BT/CL twin artic comprised of sides from Mousa, ends from 247 and other bits from MJT and scratch. Here is the progress so far.

 

 

 

..and the other side with the roof resting on.

 

 

 

The roof (MJT) is currently too high as can be seen in the photo below and I'm not quite sure why. It could be:

a) that the MJT roof is not the correct profile (but this I doubt as they sell it for their 51ft stock);

b) that the 247 ends are not correct profile (but no reason to doubt this);

c) Just a mismatch between different suppliers; or

d) I have mucked something up in putting it all together (most likely!).

 

My plan A is to file off the knobbly bits above what I believe is the ends of the train alarm gear as shown by the white arrow in the photo. This would allow the roof to sit lower down and, I hope, will more or less sort all the gaps. If anyone else has met this problem or has any better ideas, I'd be very grateful.

 

 

 

Regards

 

Andy

 

Evening Andy,

 

I'm suprised that you didn't use the MJT ends.

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1 hour ago, Headstock said:

 

Evening Andy,

 

I'm suprised that you didn't use the MJT ends.

 

I’ve not built brass non corridor stock before, so I’m on a learning curve and I had the 247 ends in stock having picked them up cheaply - Maybe a false economy! I’m using Comet ends for the other half of the twin as I need some brake ends and neither 247 nor MJT seem to do them.

 

Andy

 

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27 minutes ago, thegreenhowards said:

 

I’ve not built brass non corridor stock before, so I’m on a learning curve and I had the 247 ends in stock having picked them up cheaply - Maybe a false economy! I’m using Comet ends for the other half of the twin as I need some brake ends and neither 247 nor MJT seem to do them.

 

Andy

 

 

Evening Andy,

 

it's probably worth emailing them. I had to do so recently, to get some parts that they erroneously had down as out of stock for quite a few months. I can't see the brake end listed but the partition is. However, they do the four compartment brake third, so a brake end must be available. The sides for this carriage have to ordered by email as they are not usually in stock, this may also be true of the brake end.

 

The MJT roof is pretty much bang on, The white metal casting looks to be miles out both in height and width. The Comet ends will be rightish for width but are designed for their generic roof (MK1/ Bulleid hybrid) so will be too short.

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MJT ends are integral to the floorpan, so they won't be available separately.

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1 hour ago, jwealleans said:

MJT ends are integral to the floorpan, so they won't be available separately.

They do list ends for the non brake coaches separately https://www.dartcastings.co.uk/mjt/2853.php. Isn’t it just the inner ends which are integral to the floorpan?

 

However, I can’t see sides or ends for the brake coach listed. I will try emailing them.

 

Andy.

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Bowed ends for corridor vehicles, yes.  They are a stick on casting as I'm sure you probably knew.  I've only built one MJT non-corridor carriage and I don't have any part built pictures to show, but the ends fold up from the floorpan and then solder to the sides.  I break them off and make the whole thing part at the solebar.

 

You could ask Mike directly, he posts on here. 

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5 hours ago, thegreenhowards said:

They do list ends for the non brake coaches separately https://www.dartcastings.co.uk/mjt/2853.php. Isn’t it just the inner ends which are integral to the floorpan?

 

However, I can’t see sides or ends for the brake coach listed. I will try emailing them.

 

Andy.

 

I may be mistaken about the four compartment BT, I thought they did one in the past.

 

With regard to the dia 210 and their allocation to Basford . I'm doing the Master models kit, it is really the Bees knees as far as these carriages are concerned, with all the important parts supplied and integrated with MJT components to complete. Pictured below in experimental 1948 Banana and raspberry livery, or alternatively the base coat for teak.

 

 

Dia 210 teak under paint.jpg

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26 minutes ago, Headstock said:

 

I may be mistaken about the four compartment BT, I thought they did one in the past.

 

With regard to the dia 210 and their allocation to Basford . I'm doing the Master models kit, it is really the Bees knees as far as these carriages are concerned, with all the important parts supplied and integrated with MJT components to complete. Pictured below in experimental 1948 Banana and raspberry livery, or alternatively the base coat for teak.

 

 

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/uploads/monthly_2019_05/1427757865_Dia210teakunderpaint.jpg.0e0c0a479b0600d8a23141920f90693f.jpg

 

 

I've not heard of Master Models - do they have a web presence?

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Masterclass Models - the chap's name is Chris Higgs.  He's on here, you could PM him.  I was quite tempted by those D 210 kits when he did them, but they're out of my area and I have enough of a backlog already.

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