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Carl. H.

Shirebrook - N Gauge 1980's era layout.

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If you look very closely at the photo of the pair of 20's you can see slight fading along the cantrail of the 56 to the left, pale grey fading just above the yellow band on the 37  and also just slightly to the bottom edge of the 58 roof. 20177 has pale blue fading towards top side of the cab door as well as the cantrail and door between radiator and nose. It is subtle and when the paint is so thin you can build up the fading with careful airbrushing... going over the areas where more fading is required.

Cheers

Duncan

Edited by Duncan.
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Great set of photos Duncan. The running day looks very enjoyable and nice to see a different set of stock running. It also highlights what a difference all of your work on the locos makes to add to the realistic feel of the layout. With your locos I've had a few moments where I've thought it's the real thing when I've taken a quicker first look at a photo, with the steam locos it was more clearly a model, but a lot of fun all the same I am sure. 

 

I would agree with you about the thinned white being too much for a lot of locos. I've used it with success on rfd grey locos where the background colour is light grey, but trying the same process on an old test wagon that had a green base colour looked entirely wrong. 

 

All the best

Dave

Edited by DavidMcKenzie
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Brilliant modeling Duncan. Looks very life like and the photo has shown it off superbly. It'd be easy to forget you are modeling in N gauge. 

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Hi Duncan, Love that shot of the Ped. 

 

I found a couple of pics I took from a trip back in the day.

 

Cheers Peter.

img164 (800x522).jpg

img185 (800x500).jpg

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Hi Peter and Dave,

If you get Model Rail #265 September 2019- check the article lots of great photos there. I guess the electronic version would be available now and you could view on a large screen.. I still have the paper version:rolleyes:

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Thanks Duncan. I have been waiting for the electronic version. Not always easy to keep in touch outside the UK. Would be much easier to just nip into the corner shop, but at least the internet has helped a little.

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4 hours ago, P.C.M said:

The photo of the 37's looks like a bit of a weathering challenge!

Cheers

Duncan

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21 hours ago, P.C.M said:

Hi Peter,

Do you know the number of the 37 closest to the camera? I feel like weathering a loco to this level of filth!

 

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22 hours ago, Duncan. said:

Hi Peter,

Do you know the number of the 37 closest to the camera? I feel like weathering a loco to this level of filth!

 

Hi Duncan, Its 37121. I nice little weathering project for you, look forwards to seeing it when it done.

 

Cheers Peter.

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Hi Duncan what materials did you use to create the washing line and washing on your layout.

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18 hours ago, EWS FAN said:

Hi Duncan what materials did you use to create the washing line and washing on your layout.

Hi, I have to hand over to my wife, Janet, to explain.

Hi, the washing line is a strand of wire and the washing is plain paper. I used colouring pencils first, then cut the shapes out with scissors and scalpel and glued the washing to the line with super glue. The washing lines were anchored to buildings, hole drilled into the walls or fixed to brass posts planted into the ground. The 'blowing in the wind' look was accidental as the washing line wire twisted slightly when it was glued to the support posts or buildings!

Cheers

Janet

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1 hour ago, Duncan. said:

Hi, I have to hand over to my wife, Janet, to explain.

Hi, the washing line is a strand of wire and the washing is plain paper. I used colouring pencils first, then cut the shapes out with scissors and scalpel and glued the washing to the line with super glue. The washing lines were anchored to buildings, hole drilled into the walls or fixed to brass posts planted into the ground. The 'blowing in the wind' look was accidental as the washing line wire twisted slightly when it was glued to the support posts or buildings!

Cheers

Janet

Hi Janet many thanks for the info of how you made the washing line and the washing. It looks very realistic in the photo which they used in the Article in Model Rail Magazine. I will be attempting something similar on my N Gauge layout.

Cheers Mike.

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Duncan and I look forward to seeing your washing, please post a photo.

Janet

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1 hour ago, Duncan. said:

Duncan and I look forward to seeing your washing, please post a photo.

Janet

Will do lol...

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Hi Everyone,

It has been a very difficult few weeks for us. Part of the fall out was that we haven't had a space to make repairs or add further detail to the model. Today has been the first opportunity we have had to get the model ready for the up coming Leeds show (October 26 and 27 Leeds Grammar School). Mark, part of the operating team, has been reinforcing the hidden sidings control panels my original 'lightweight' design was just too fragile! Janet has today been sorting out the safety railings atop the viaduct and I have been refreshing some of the ground cover, planting a yard lamp, and testing controllers after modifying them (to see if they still worked!), -they did.

IMG_1560.JPG

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Hi,

So here is the first of the reinforced hidden sidings control panels this being for the 'Up Side'. The outer grey casing makes the whole more stable and this item becomes one less worry at exhibitions. Thanks mark for the carpentry.

Cheers

Duncan

IMG_1566.JPG

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Hi Duncan. That control panel looks rather smart.  I am guessing that those are isolated sections in order to automatically stop a train, together with a push button to start the train off?

Could you explain how you make your route selection work with one push switch per route? I need to sort out some sort of remote control for my storage sidings.

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, andy stroud said:

Hi Duncan. That control panel looks rather smart.  I am guessing that those are isolated sections in order to automatically stop a train, together with a push button to start the train off?

Could you explain how you make your route selection work with one push switch per route? I need to sort out some sort of remote control for my storage sidings.

Hi Andy,

The mimic diagram of the tracks in black. These sections of track are always live, except roads 1, 5,6 and 8 where you can see simple on-off switches on  the left hand side of those roads. The red arrows are isolating sections, again roads 1,5,6 and 8 are divided into two with two isolating sections, therefore these sidings can hold two trains. The toggle switches mounted within the 'red' sections are centre off, switched upwards the switches lock into that position and the section is 'on' all the time. Switched downwards the toggle is spring loaded and returns to the centre off position when you let go of it. Thus only 'on' when you hold it downwards. The sidings are one direction only and the red push buttons on the exit of the sidings are push to make and operate the route setting to leave the sidings via a diode matrix and capacitor discharge units.

So in normal operation lets say we want to run a train from number 1 road.

The exit push button to set the route is pressed. The black toggle is pressed downwards... the loco will draw forward out of the sidings (power always on) when the loco has passed out of the isolating (red) section it will continue towards the scenic sections.

When it reaches the scenic section it comes under the control of another controller ( in this case the up main and is under the control of the UP MAIN Panel (Not shown). 

Now that number 1 road is empty the train in the rear section can be brought forward. Simply pressing the toggle downwards will provide power to the isolating section and the train will draw forward to the next isolating section. This move will not affect the running of the first train since that is being controlled by the controller connected to the UP MAIN panel.

Now the route into the hidden sidings can be set (number 1 entry push button- working in the same way as the exit push to makes). The first train on completion of its circuit through the scenic section will now enter road 1 and will come back under the control of the UP YARD Panel (unless you set a different road for it., such as number 7 ,where there are no isolating sections and the train can make another circuit of the layout  once the route from number 7 is set.

I do hope this makes some sense....

In total there are 5 control panels. Below is a photo of the Down Main Panel (I don't have one for the Up Main). You will notice that the hidden sidings are missing from the mimic as they will be controlled from the Down Yard Panel!

Cheers

Duncan

One for just the Depot, 1 Up Main, 1 Up Yard, 1 Down Main, 1 Down Yard. Whereas the 'Yard' panels use push button route setting, all others use stud and probe. All panels work with the aid of capacitor discharge units and diode matrices.

 

181205_Shirebrook_IMG_8565.jpg

Edited by Duncan.
typo
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Hi,

Here's a shot of the 'Depot' Panel.

Cheers

Duncan

181205_Shirebrook_IMG_8569.jpg

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Hi Duncan  thankyou for for that very detailed explanation. Very informative. I have to do something similar on my layout soon. 

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Posted (edited)

Evening All,

In the photo below we see my modified Farish class 45 locomotive waiting to leave the down refuge siding with a train of MCVs for Doncaster Decoy. The loco has been resprayed and renumbered to 45019  The roof water fillers have been plated over and an etched radiator fan and grille  (from my own artwork) have  replaced the molded ones. The noses have been modified to depict the sealed beam marker lights. In the background are a selection of my repainted and weathered loco fleet. 

Photo Credit is Chris Nevard/Model Rail

Cheers

Duncan 

181205_Shirebrook_DSC_4587c.jpg

Edited by Duncan.
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Stunning modeling there Duncan. I know it's not the first time I've seen such brilliant photos from your layout, but I can't help thinking WOW everytime you post another. 

 

Is the backscene self painted? 

 

All the best

Dave

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Hi Dave,

The back scene was painted by my stepson Ted. I found a few general photos of the area as reference for him. He sketched the 'view' on the backscene boards (thin ply that I undercoated with a grey emulsion paint) with pencil and blocked in some colours to match the layout itself. He used a number of 'match pots' available at most DIY stores... The remainder he did off site at his home to about 95% complete with final detailing when the back scene boards were reinstalled on the layout.

I think the cool winter colours and 'mistyness' he developed is superb and the finished result gives a great impression of the area with a real feel of receding  depth.

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34 minutes ago, Duncan. said:

Evening All,

In the photo below we see my modified Farish class 45 locomotive waiting to leave the down refuge siding with a train of MCVs for Doncaster Decoy. The loco has been resprayed and renumbered to 45019  The roof water fillers have been plated over and an etched radiator fan and grille  (from my own artwork) have  replaced the molded ones. The noses have been modified to depict the sealed beam marker lights. In the background are a selection of my repainted and weathered loco fleet. 

Photo Credit is Chris Nevard/Model Rail

Cheers

Duncan

 

Exquisite.  The only word I can think of.  If my modelling is ever half that good in models twice the size, I will be very pleased.

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