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PSL Roadrailer project - detail CAD for resin cast or 3D print


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.... the simplified kit assembly shown above does not have all the detail items hung onto the parts yet - far easier and simpler to get the fit and build right with simplified components and then add the correct amount of detail too it - there are 144 component parts to the detailed CAD model !

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.... looking for ideas as to what other modelers do or what people actually want from a kit ? - the scalecraft kit version has 16 rivet heads of around a scale .75 inch diameter spaced approx 4 inches apart (this gives the idea of it looking something like real but is not) -  in reality there are 38 .375 inch rivets spaced 2 inches apart - will this just be unrealistic at a scale size - in my test they are barely visible at 7mm scale to the naked eye, but look good with a magnifying glass ! then at 4mm they are there but barely visible even with the magnifying glass.

 

Do people just want a reproduction of the scalecraft kit, with more correct details in certain areas - for exmple the roofline, wheels tucking under etc. ?

Hi Andy,

 

I've been following your thread with interest and may I say, excellent work so far !

 

Your comments upon the size of rivet heads is an interesting one for there are various sections of materials that do not necessarily scale for instance, a steam locomotive's buffer beam at 1"thick would scale to .013" or .33mm in 4mm scale and the only rivets that might stand out in true scale would be boiler and main frame rivets at approximately 1.25" head diameter. The Roadrailers were not built quite so solidly built as any steam locomotive.

 

I would suggest that leaving the small rivet detail off is as good as offering fair representation of rivets and comes down to a matter of choice dictated by what anyone ought to be able to see over what anyone might think that they should be able see.

A tricky call. one that I would answer by saying, if it looks right it is right.

 

Gibbo.

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Hi Andy,

 

I've been following your thread with interest and may I say, excellent work so far !

 

Your comments upon the size of rivet heads is an interesting one for there are various sections of materials that do not necessarily scale for instance, a steam locomotive's buffer beam at 1"thick would scale to .013" or .33mm in 4mm scale and the only rivets that might stand out in true scale would be boiler and main frame rivets at approximately 1.25" head diameter. The Roadrailers were not built quite so solidly built as any steam locomotive.

 

I would suggest that leaving the small rivet detail off is as good as offering fair representation of rivets and comes down to a matter of choice dictated by what anyone ought to be able to see over what anyone might think that they should be able see.

A tricky call. one that I would answer by saying, if it looks right it is right.

 

Gibbo.

 

 

 

.... yes " if it looks right, it is right" was often used at work before it went all CAD and CNC - but so was "good enough for spares " !     :mosking: 

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.... yes " if it looks right, it is right" was often used at work before it went all CAD and CNC - but so was "good enough for spares " !     :mosking:

Hi Andy,

 

I would say that function defines form while directing you toward two of Raymond Loewy's quotes;

 

"Good design is not an applied veneer."

 

"People will turn to you, follow you, support you only as long as they are confident that you are doing your best."

 

Keep up the good work !

 

Gibbo.

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  • 2 weeks later...

..... of interest -: I bought a magazine with a free 'grounded wagon' kit attached and have taken a close look at the detail and rivets - the angle iron frame is 0.5mm thick (38mm true scale) as is the rivet diameter, best measurement I could get on the rivet head thickness was 0.46mm) so was probably the same. It gives a convincing visual representation of a wagon so some scale fudging may have to be done (like the original kit)

 

Andy

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... any recommendations on wheels and bearings?, I see you can get 14.1mm metal disk wheels, and brass top hat bearings, I have started the model underframe and bogie so have to plan for what to fit, and how to make it so as to be able to be assembled relatively easily. 

 

As long as 26mm pinpoints fit between the bearings, that should suffice for all gauge preferences.

 

Mike.

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... any recommendations on wheels and bearings?, I see you can get 14.1mm metal disk wheels, and brass top hat bearings, I have started the model underframe and bogie so have to plan for what to fit, and how to make it so as to be able to be assembled relatively easily. 

 

Prototype used 30" wheels. I used these ultrascales with the rivets machined off. It left two recesses to fill with chrome paint to represent the brake pad polished area's.

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OK - its been detective time, looking at the bottom photo below -:

 

gallery_34954_4587_2796403.jpg

 

 

.... it shows some extra bits that are not on the prototypes (circled) - I know what some of them are as they are in the 'Eagle' illustration as below,

 

gallery_34954_4587_293768.jpg

 

 

... but what is the indicator board part, it seems to fit around and to the right of the vacuum brake handle (that is on the prototypes) and the needle points down and slightly rearward when in the rail configuration - there are a couple of other parts that I am not sure of as shown above (not on the prototypes) - any help appreciated ?

 

I was intrigued to the date/timeline of this photo so started looking - the cab of the lorry tells a story - it is an Leyland with an LAD cab, but not the late 50s version, it has the later rounded arches, after a while I had deduced it was a Leyland Beaver, then some luck - whilst looking for Leyland Beaver images I found a dated photo of a Leyland Beaver with a Roadrailer Trailer ! - incorrectly labeled as Container semi-trailer “RoadRailer” - looks like its outside the factory, like some of the other pictures of it and the one above, that I have found (from the same set ?) .... its date 24-09-1962

 

it is available here http://www.britishcommercialvehiclemuseum.com/image-archives/product/leyland-beaver-power-plusl069499a/

 

All these items are only on the production versions from what I have found - any proof otherwise greatly received.

 

Andy

Edited by rowehillmaster
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OK - its been detective time, looking at the bottom photo below -:

 

... but what is the indicator board part,

 

 

I was told it was the load indicator and brake strength adjuster. Maybe Mr Tilt can throw some light?

 

post-508-0-75599000-1544454655.jpg

 

BTW most picture captions for the many times published bottom pick in the MRJ article state the locations is Pressed Steel at Linwood but it's definitely Cowley. (Just by one of the many sets of bike sheds and Aircraft Gun alignment Earthwork)

 

P

Edited by Porcy Mane
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  • 2 weeks later...

.... did nobody spot the major error in my work ? - today I started to assemble the adapter bogie and then it hit me !  - those wheels look small, I thought - a bit of checking and I have done all the work on the underframe etc upon the Roadrailer on 2ft rail wheels like the US version ! , the whole way through I have for some unknown to me reason worked with the wrong size wheels ! - when I look at there are proportional clues it is obvious - how did I not spot it ! -  :O

 

.... this will require some major rework of the underframe components, as they will be 3 inches too far rearwards and the big casting is 3 inches too short, all the brakes have been done to fit around a diameter that is 6 inches too small - what a fool !

 

:negative:  :negative:  :negative:

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.... did nobody spot the major error in my work ? - today I started to assemble the adapter bogie and then it hit me !  - those wheels look small, I thought - a bit of checking and I have done all the work on the underframe etc upon the Roadrailer on 2ft rail wheels like the US version ! , the whole way through I have for some unknown to me reason worked with the wrong size wheels ! - when I look at there are proportional clues it is obvious - how did I not spot it ! -  :O

 

.... this will require some major rework of the underframe components, as they will be 3 inches too far rearwards and the big casting is 3 inches too short, all the brakes have been done to fit around a diameter that is 6 inches too small - what a fool !

 

:negative:  :negative:  :negative:

Those that do not make mistakes do not not do anything.

 

You are no fool, I'm sure you will fix it.

 

Gibbo.

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  • 1 month later...
8 hours ago, rowehillmaster said:

any one any ideas on what the second vac pipe was for ?

vac_pipes_01.jpg

vac_pipes_02.jpg

Hi There,

 

Flexible pipes are sometimes used to prevent the steel pipes fracturing due to vibration although the arrangement doesn't seem to make sense because the one in the top photograph indicated with yellows lines seems to be fixed to a dummy. The pipe marked with a green arrow seems to be attached to a tee-piece  that has one branch going down the the brakes on the bogie.

 

It is a strange arrangement and I might be talking nonsense as a consequence !

 

Gibbo.

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That looks like the RCTS phots of the prototype adaptor wagon that had a slightly different piping arrangement to to production batch  (Page 59. Rowland).

 

Yellow will be the train pipe and... pure guesswork from me; I think the yellow will probably be the adaptor wagon brake pipe arranged to allow disconnection to allow the rotation of the upper frame. I've never seen any evidence of how a vac cylinder was mounted on the adaptor wagon but there must have been one (on the production batch at least) as there is a direct admission valve in a very exposed position on the York built adaptors.

 

Something else I've never worked out is why, there was a second pipe that exited the adaptor wagon draw beam in the position you would expect to see the steam heat pipe on a loco/conventional coach, as well as the brake pipe exiting in the expected position???

P

Edited by Porcy Mane
Spill chucker changes.
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