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cdollins

My 3-D printed buildings

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First step is to see if I can do this.  This building is in HO scale.  Printed on a friends Flashforge Pro.  STL file created using 123D and Inventor Pro.  Slicer program was Simplyfy3d

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Well, that worked.  I am in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.  76 years old.  Have published in US train magazines.   This forum is much better than anything we have in the US.  Probably because we just buy stuff and don't do much scratch building.  The building shown is based somewhat on a Lilliput Miniature I bought many years ago.  I made many changes to the original.  But I really liked the model.  I think mainly because of the complexity.   More pictures of it. 

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This is the train station that was in Central City, Colorado.  The last owner wanted to put mine tailings on the site but he liked the brick work and so remove the roof and then gently filled the site with the tailings.  It is now under about 100 meters of rock.  The model was printed with ABS.   The plans were published in the "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette" magazine.

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Thanks for the kind comment.  This fire escape is 3-D printed.  The building was not.  It is on the layout of Ken Hanawalt.  No idea how to rotate the picture.  The bottom is on the right.

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Edited by cdollins
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This is a model of the train station in Forks Creek, Colorado, USA.  It is long gone.  The plans were in the "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette."  Also is a G gauge house, but I was afraid to get closer.

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Forks Creek, Colorado is long gone.  Interstate 70 wiped it out, but this is a model of a restaurant owned by the railroad.  Again in HO scale.  These buildings were painted box car red because that is what the railroad had.  It was a narrow gauge railroad  out of Denver up to Georgetown.  It is said that it took eleven years to build a road between Georgetown and Golden Colorado.  When it was discovered that the gravel was high grade silver ore the road disappeared in three days.

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This is the section house at Forks Creek.  The train crews would sleep on the second floor and cook, eat, and complain about railroad management on the first floor.  The plans are from the "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette."  

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Thanks for the kind comment. This fire escape is 3-D printed. The building was not. It is on the layout of Ken Hannawalt. No idea how to rotate the picture. The bottom is on the right.

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Tip for future: You should be able to use just about any photo editing software to rotate your photo before uploading it to RMWEB. I find Irfanview (free, Windows only) very good for rotating, cropping or resizing photos.

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This was a shoe store in Black Hawk, Colorado.  It is what is called a false front building.  These were very common all over the west.  I grew up in Champaign, Illinois and our grocery story looked exactly like this building.  Three blocks in the other direction from out house was a saloon that looked like this.  The bar tender also sold Popsicles so it was a favorite place for both children and drunks.  The plans are from the "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette." .

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I bought a Prusa kit for the MK2.  It came with PLA so I am now printing on my own printer using PLA.  Simplify3D has a lower opinion of either PLA as opposed to ABS or of the Prusa versus the Flashforge because it will not print wall thickness smaller than 0.5 mm.  Here is the side of  a rooming house in Black Hawk, Colorado and the front of the grocery store next to it.  The rooming house is long gone but the grocery store is now part of a casino.  Both again from the "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette."  Thank you for looking at my work.

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The layer thickness on the Flashforge was 0.1mm and on the Prusa 0.15mm.  On the Flashforge the bricks were designed to be 2.2 mm long by 0.6 mm high.  Separated by 0.3 mm.  It worked well.  I was using ABS.  On the Prusa a brick height of 0.6mm would not work.  The bricks are now 0.5mm high same as the window muntins and mullions.  One bead of PLA is put down for both windows and bricks.  The bricks in both cases were printed 0.3mm thick.  3 layes for ABS and 2 for PLA.  The PLA is a low viscosity liquid at the extruder temperature so when the end of printing one brick the filament is retracted and then for the next brick the filament is advanced and then retracted and so on.  This causes the filament to go up and down rapidly over the nearly the same region.  If there is enough friction on the spool a hole  will be worn in the filament and printing stops.  I now use skate board ball bearing races on the spool axis.  That works well.

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Completely off topic but can I congratulate you on your yard.

 

Down here we are experiencing the worst drought in over 100 years so seeing green grass and healthy flowering plants is a novelty.

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I don't think we have ever had a drought.   In the pictures of the section house in the background you can see a band in the arborvitae near the top.  Deer had eaten all the leaves off the arborvitae below that band several years ago.  They could not reach higher.  A lot of rain and a lot of deer.

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Hi All I don't know if you know about it but there is a plugin for

 

Sketchup called Obbs this allows you to create many different surface textures.

I have been seeing this for a while and I am well impressed.

All the best

Bob

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Excellent work there! I was wondering (in post #12), did you print the storefront flat on the build-plate? Did you print it on the Prusa (at 0.15 layer height?)

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Excellent work there! I was wondering (in post #12), did you print the storefront flat on the build-plate? Did you print it on the Prusa (at 0.15 layer height?)

Yes.  You also need to know the slicer program which was Simplify3D.  Different slicer programs give different results.  You would need the extrusion width, which is a slicer input, to get those results. 

Edited by cdollins

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Yes.  You also need to know the slicer program which was Simplify3D.  Different slicer programs give different results.  You would need the extrusion width, which is a slicer input, to get those results. 

 

Thank you for the reply. Did you set a specific number for the extrusion width? Slic3r PE has 0.45mm for example in the 0.1mm layer height setting (with a 0.4mm nozzle)

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Thank you for the reply. Did you set a specific number for the extrusion width? Slic3r PE has 0.45mm for example in the 0.1mm layer height setting (with a 0.4mm nozzle)

I have the extrusion multiplier set to 0.85mm.  The width was set to auto which was 0.48mm.  I think I need to increase one of these two numbers to get more material coming out to get better closure between the extruded beads.  Right now I am working on putting together the the grocery store for which the parts are all printed.

Edited by cdollins

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This is the rooming house in Black Hawk, Colorado.  It has since been torn down.  I tried to print clap board on the front of the house with 6" spacing.  It did not turn out that way.  It appears to be tonuge and groove with a 12" spacing.    May try using 0.1mm layer thickness in the future to see if that turns out better.  The plans were from the "Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette."

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This is a model of a grocery store in Black Hawk, Colorado, USA.  The building is still standing.  On Google maps in street view you can see the odd combination of windows and doors in the back of the building.  The building is now part of a casino.   The plans and photos of the building were published in "The Narrow Gauge and Short Line Gazette".  Thank you for looking at my work.

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I have created a web site where STL files for all of the buildings can be downloaded.  It is charles.dollins.org/buildings/

Edited by cdollins

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This is a model of the train depot in Leadville, Colorado for the Colorado Midland Railroad as it existed in 1900.  The depot is no longer there.  A  photograph of the station is from the book "Down at the Depot".   The model is in HO scale and is almost two feet long.  A large number of STL files were used in printing the model.  They can be downloaded from my web site at charles.dollins.org/buildings/

          

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