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Still no sign of the parts I am waiting for so another couple of hours of odd jobs. One of which has been to play around with the makings of 'my' white river. The stonework is a Wills culvert and although not quite apparent from the photo it is standing about 20mm in front of the trackbed. Nothing is fixed down yet. I'm wondering if it should be set a little higher so that the parapet - the top section of stonework -  is above the trackbed but what I'd like to do is remove the parapet altogether so that the embankment is seen to slope down to the stonework. Or would this be nonsense? - I know very little about bridges! Any thought? Having said all that if what I've done is correct I'm content as it is.

 

IMG_6183.jpeg.5201728032e99804da35ff9ead0c15db.jpeg

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IMHO, the parapet should sit higher and closer to the track.  This way the embankment  would have a more realistic slope to the stonework each side of the tunnel mouth. Is there not a proper word that describes these 'wings'?

     Brian.

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If there is a parapet, it should be a bit higher, so that both sides are above track level.

 

For that particular structure, I think it would be better without the parapet. But it needs to be far enough forward from the edge of the trackbed to give an embankment slope (batter) of 45 degrees or less.

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38 minutes ago, brianusa said:

IMHO, the parapet should sit higher and closer to the track.  This way the embankment  would have a more realistic slope to the stonework each side of the tunnel mouth. Is there not a proper word that describes these 'wings'?

     Brian.

 

31 minutes ago, Joseph_Pestell said:

If there is a parapet, it should be a bit higher, so that both sides are above track level.

 

For that particular structure, I think it would be better without the parapet. But it needs to be far enough forward from the edge of the trackbed to give an embankment slope (batter) of 45 degrees or less.

 

More experimentation tomorrow I think! :) 

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1 hour ago, TrevorP1 said:

 

John, I was under the impression that the 'box on the down side was the Cornwall Railway one... Or was there one on the first Burngullow station ie the one opposite what became Blackpool Clay works. Speaking of which am I right in thinking that the large house here, on the down side, was connected with this original station?

Trevor, the "working" box on the Down side was the later one. The old CR box was opposite, on the Up side in the vee of the junction:

 

http://www.cornwallrailwaysociety.org.uk/uploads/7/6/8/3/7683812/____2311223_orig.jpg

 

No idea about the large house, sorry.

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1 hour ago, brianusa said:

Is there not a proper word that describes these 'wings'?

 

20 minutes ago, KeithMacdonald said:

 

Err, abutments?

 

Not a civil engineer, but I would call them wing walls.

Abutments support a girder bridge (and presumably the brick arch too).

Paul.

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53 minutes ago, 5BarVT said:

 

Not a civil engineer, but I would call them wing walls.

Abutments support a girder bridge (and presumably the brick arch too).

Paul.


I would have used the term ‘wing walls’ but had no idea it was the correct one! Wing Walls. The things you learn building a model railway.
 

 

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After some bodging and hacking I think I've got what I'm looking for. All just resting in position at the moment with a small piece of hanging basket liner to gauge the effect. I'm going to give the basket liner a go as a starting point for the embankment grass, Carol was most surprised at my enthusiasm to visit the garden centre at the  weekend...

 

IMG_6191.jpeg.102c1e4eb1ae898a4a219576de6d81a1.jpeg

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With the arrival of the last Peco Bullhead point I've managed to finish track laying on the up loop. The china clay sidings remain to be done but I'm going to have a play around with lengths of track and some cardboard boxes (to represent the Linhay)  before I go any further. Wiring up remains but I can't do any of this until the remaining bus terminal blocks arrive - I thought I'd beaten the 'China Crisis' but it seems I haven't. It has been possible to test the loop though, relying on fishplates for electrical contact and a long D6XX to bridge the unpowered frogs.

 

The points have been modified using the  @Chamby technique and this works very well. Having done several now I've become quite adept at it but I still have my heart in my mouth when I go through the switch rails with the Dremel!

 

On the scenery front, most of the embankment is now covered in at least one layer plaster bandage.

 

At other odd times I've been leafing through lots of books for clear photos of china clay wagons. I can now tell a BR built one from it's GW cousin but what I've also discovered it that well into the 1950s there were still a lot of ex private owner wagons around, some obviously quite elderly and even the odd one with what appear to be grease axleboxes. There has been a discussion about ex PO coal wagons on Tony Wright's thread and it seems much of what was said about coal wagons applies equally to china clays.

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Some productive time spent on the railway in the last couple of days. There has been a blitz on wiring and making a start on the scenic side panel. Switches 1 to 5 control the pointwork indicated on the diagram below. The LED above each switch shows green when the point is set 'normal' ie straight and red when the switch is operated to change the point or crossover. Eventually the switches will be numbered as in the diagram but for now I have to count from 1 to 5!

 

There is space available for replacing the diamond with a single slip should I ever be able/decide to. Below the pointwork switches is space for signal operating switches in the future. I intend to mount a controller caddy on the left of the panel and a 'signal box diagram' nearby. 

 

The diagram is still a work in progress but the intention is for it to be in the style of a 'real' signal box diagram.

 

At the moment switch 4 is not connected to anything as I have one more point motor to install, hopefully later in the week. Unfortunately I did something to my back the other day - whilst loading the dishwasher of all things! - and if I got under the layout at the moment I'd probable be there for a few days... 

 

Panel.jpg.34e8f616b6bff12b4f2fbba685c38921.jpg

 

2122890832_BurngullowLaneSBDiag.jpg.7dfb36ec66daf256e6d25427d072fc1c.jpg

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15 hours ago, TrevorP1 said:

Some productive time spent on the railway in the last couple of days. There has been a blitz on wiring and making a start on the scenic side panel. Switches 1 to 5 control the pointwork indicated on the diagram below. The LED above each switch shows green when the point is set 'normal' ie straight and red when the switch is operated to change the point or crossover. Eventually the switches will be numbered as in the diagram but for now I have to count from 1 to 5!

 

There is space available for replacing the diamond with a single slip should I ever be able/decide to. Below the pointwork switches is space for signal operating switches in the future. I intend to mount a controller caddy on the left of the panel and a 'signal box diagram' nearby. 

 

The diagram is still a work in progress but the intention is for it to be in the style of a 'real' signal box diagram.

 

At the moment switch 4 is not connected to anything as I have one more point motor to install, hopefully later in the week. Unfortunately I did something to my back the other day - whilst loading the dishwasher of all things! - and if I got under the layout at the moment I'd probable be there for a few days... 

 

Panel.jpg.34e8f616b6bff12b4f2fbba685c38921.jpg

 

2122890832_BurngullowLaneSBDiag.jpg.7dfb36ec66daf256e6d25427d072fc1c.jpg

A Modratec fully-interlocked lever frame would be just the job...

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1 hour ago, St Enodoc said:

A Modratec fully-interlocked lever frame would be just the job...

 

In another life I'd probably agree :) but I'm already trying to cram too much into this one! 

 

I find accounts of real life signalling work very interesting. A summer Saturday in the 1950s at Whiteball real railway work.

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With the current suffering around the world it seems almost uncomfortable to say that we’ve had a good day here at ‘Burngullow Lane land’ but there is no point in sitting around moping.


We seem to have got our food and provisions sorted, Carol has been gardening and good work has been done on the train set. Our holidays in the West Country seem in doubt but when Carol’s daughter, who is a sister at the local hospital and accustomed to witnessing suffering, sounds almost scared and tells us, “This is the lull before the storm,“ a postponed holiday doesn’t seem to matter much.

 

To the railway then... At the workbench production of china clay wagons has commenced with 3 almost finished, 3 more underway and more kits just ordered from H & A. I’ll do a separate post on these soon but I’m producing types mentioned ‘up thread’ plus ideas of my own based on study of photos.


E894BDDE-EB8F-47E5-BAA8-FC9B84EB1115.jpeg.4ee7010b2eb6c6d5c3b1894e873c2a85.jpeg

 

On the railway itself, excluding signals, electrical work on the ‘scenic side’ is complete and fitting of facia boards has commenced. I aim to finish these soon while the weather holds as all wood cutting is done outside.

 

I have to say that I’m glad I bit the bullet and changed my ideas. Somehow things ‘seem right’ and everything is slotting into place very well.

 

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12 minutes ago, TrevorP1 said:

Carol’s daughter, who is a sister at the local hospital and accustomed to witnessing suffering, sounds almost scared and tells us, “This is the lull before the storm,“ a postponed holiday doesn’t seem to matter much.

 

 

I find that going into the train room and shutting the door is very therapeutic!  At least for a while.:mellow:

       Brian.

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With all the activity on RM Web at the moment it is near impossible to keep up with the topics I follow let alone post updates to keep up with my activity - of which there has been a respectable amount. Iain Rice's famous words have never seemed more prophetic than now - along the lines of "there's no real point in railway modelling but it just might stop somebody going mad one day...".

 

A few days ago I completed the control panel for the hidden sidings ("at last" did I hear someone say?). Playing trains is much easier now! For those interested there is photo on 'Wright Writes' but as one bank of switches looks much like another I won't bother to post another here. In order to thoroughly test all the trackwork, there will indeed be much playing with the trains before I begin track painting and ballasting.

 

For the moment attention has  turned back to the basis of the scenery and I was pleasantly surprised to find that I will be able to include the inspirational 'bus view' that started all this. A Corgi Bristol was located on eBay for a fiver and although it's flanks proudly proclaim 'London Transport' it will do for now. I'll have play around with some card to see if I can produce some low relief cottage to represent those in the real location. I think I can get away with it but if they look wrong I'll leave them out. After all this is 'Burngullow Lane' not 'Burngullow'.

 

The cardboard box in the background is where the linhay will be located. It's just under two feet long and while large by model standards it is obviously tiny in comparison to the real things. @Stoker has kindly provided much information on these structures and I will do my best to get it right. Very early days on this but I found that by angling the building slightly more towards the viewer I should be able to get an impression of the settling tanks in view. Of course, as stated, the building is very short but I'm wondering if there is a way I can use a suitably disguised  mirror to create an impression of greater length. We'll see.

 

IMG_6229.jpeg.7da0239201cd1a7aa80eb169101c8637.jpeg

 

As the trains passed by tonight I realised that in future there will be a good 'photo spot' hereabouts. This is Dumbleton Hall heading for home on the 13:55 Penzance - Newton Abbot. Three empty  Eastern region fish vans have been attached to the front on the first stage of their long journey back to Grimsby. The engine is the Bachmann product of that name but it has been modified to BR livery and attached to a Hawksworth tender to represent how the real loco was running c1960.

 

IMG_6232.jpeg.4ffc6280adb0395e78ae438e4908e173.jpeg

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2 hours ago, TrevorP1 said:

With all the activity on RM Web at the moment it is near impossible to keep up with the topics I follow let alone post updates to keep up with my activity - of which there has been a respectable amount. Iain Rice's famous words have never seemed more prophetic than now - along the lines of "there's no real point in railway modelling but it just might stop somebody going mad one day...".

 

A few days ago I completed the control panel for the hidden sidings ("at last" did I hear someone say?). Playing trains is much easier now! For those interested there is photo on 'Wright Writes' but as one bank of switches looks much like another I won't bother to post another here. In order to thoroughly test all the trackwork, there will indeed be much playing with the trains before I begin track painting and ballasting.

 

For the moment attention has  turned back to the basis of the scenery and I was pleasantly surprised to find that I will be able to include the inspirational 'bus view' that started all this. A Corgi Bristol was located on eBay for a fiver and although it's flanks proudly proclaim 'London Transport' it will do for now. I'll have play around with some card to see if I can produce some low relief cottage to represent those in the real location. I think I can get away with it but if they look wrong I'll leave them out. After all this is 'Burngullow Lane' not 'Burngullow'.

 

The cardboard box in the background is where the linhay will be located. It's just under two feet long and while large by model standards it is obviously tiny in comparison to the real things. @Stoker has kindly provided much information on these structures and I will do my best to get it right. Very early days on this but I found that by angling the building slightly more towards the viewer I should be able to get an impression of the settling tanks in view. Of course, as stated, the building is very short but I'm wondering if there is a way I can use a suitably disguised  mirror to create an impression of greater length. We'll see.

 

IMG_6229.jpeg.7da0239201cd1a7aa80eb169101c8637.jpeg

 

As the trains passed by tonight I realised that in future there will be a good 'photo spot' hereabouts. This is Dumbleton Hall heading for home on the 13:55 Penzance - Newton Abbot. Three empty  Eastern region fish vans have been attached to the front on the first stage of their long journey back to Grimsby. The engine is the Bachmann product of that name but it has been modified to BR livery and attached to a Hawksworth tender to represent how the real loco was running c1960.

 

IMG_6232.jpeg.4ffc6280adb0395e78ae438e4908e173.jpeg

Lovely stuff Trevor.

 

I did say "at last" but only quietly so you wouldn't hear me...

 

Great to see the inspirational bus. I've also got the LT Bristol L5 waiting for a transfer of ownership, although I won't be able to recreate that exact scene oobviously. I look forward to lots of photos from this angle or possibly slightly wider.

 

Good use of a Hattons box if I'm not mistaken?

 

My linhay is about the same size as yours and that doesn't bother me at all.

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As John so astutely observed that is indeed a Hattons box serving as temporary linhay. Waste not, want not!

 

I've got on a bit more over the last couple of days. I found it took surprisingly long to work out how best to create the 'lie of the land' necessary. The aim is to complete as much of the messy stuff as soon as possible. I've used 3mm foam board under the track in this area and it all makes a nice square 3mm deep recess for the clay dry to eventually sit in. John will also notice :)  ;) the Peco code 75 flat bottom point doing service here. I'm sure that once buried in a mixture of china clay waste and other detritus it is unlikely to be noticeable. The Hattons box will keep it's job for a while yet as I've printed off some sections of the front view and with a bit of Stanley knife wielding and Pritt sticking it will do for a 'placeholder'.

 

At the bottom is the view that the residents of the cottages will have. I was concerned that they'd be too close to the clay dry but then I looked at an old map of Burngullow and they would have been less that 80 feet from the nearest chimney. These people can think themselves lucky! I'm not sure how the famous bus will turn round in the space but I remember from the days of my youth that Cornish bus drivers were quite intrepid folk so reversing down from the main road should be no problem...

 

Clay wagon production has paused for the moment until I get bored with scenery.

 

IMG_6251.jpeg.683ef8d5f10d5f4ba939b324c1347861.jpeg

 

IMG_6252.jpeg.90192611e61104a0231b8b582b29666a.jpeg

 

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Looking at what you've got there, I think you could get more "frontage" if you built your kiln angled around the curve, and used the turnout to form a coal stub instead.

Forgive the rather crude drawing, but this should roughly demonstrate what I mean:
kiln.jpg.511daf4648b1df87d463a9e80819e25b.jpg

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6 hours ago, TrevorP1 said:

John will also notice :)  ;) the Peco code 75 flat bottom point doing service here.

Actually, I didn't! Looks good though.

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13 hours ago, Stoker said:

Looking at what you've got there, I think you could get more "frontage" if you built your kiln angled around the curve, and used the turnout to form a coal stub instead.

Forgive the rather crude drawing, but this should roughly demonstrate what I mean:
kiln.jpg.511daf4648b1df87d463a9e80819e25b.jpg

 

I have considered something like that but overall, bearing in mind the relatively small size of the layout, I felt the kiln would be too dominant. As it is I've tried to strike a balance between keeping as much empty land as possible against the kiln looking like it was stuck in the corner 'just to fill the space'.

 

Of course I have created the problem of trying to make the kiln look longer/making it merge into a backscene but I'm not going to start building the kiln proper until I know the idea will work. I'd also hoped to visit Wheal Martyn again before I started the build but with this wretched Covid 19 that's looking far from certain this year.

 

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