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ianathompson

AFK A room sized layout that hosts intensive operating sessions.

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The cricket season has begun and some N gauge activity has also taken place.

There are a few photos however on he updated website at https://myafk.net/operating-session-5

 

46983292915_a45100bac6_c.jpg5-127 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.126 With its rods whirring the articulated makes its way up the Vulpafaŭkangulo alongside the quick flowing Aepto. This is the first opportunity to get this train out from under Urteno's feet. Hopefully it will be of more use at Ithilarak in helping to sort things out there.

 

Ian T

 

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Cricket does get in the way of modelling. This week I have Thursdayoff from umpiring.

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Thanks for the link

Baz

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it is great to see a Railway being operated with the same hour by hour problems as the real ones. There are reasons for operational problems and the controller needs to be quick about their wits to stop it all clogging up completely. 

 

Thank you for sharing this.

 

Baz

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Following a respite the session has been resumed.

The full set of photos can be found at https://myafk.net/operating-session-5

 

48103046776_ae2b286040_z.jpg5-164 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.164 With the railcar having arrived the special wastes no time in getting onto the move once the signal, in the background, drops to clear.

 

48103099788_efa5b1527f_z.jpg5-168 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.167 The delayed RFK-FDV freight is let out onto the Vulpafaŭkangulo in preference to the von Ryan. It is now running around half an hour late but will have little trouble in coping with this lightweight load.

 

48103100638_010a1623d9_z.jpg5-180 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.179 The von Ryan jogs alongside the Aepto in the lower part of the gorge. There would be little to see as, being well away from civilisation, the whole area would be in pitch blackness. The train made it first appearance in photo 5.62 and has been 'on the road' as such for over twelve hours, although five of these were spent sitting in a siding at Ospicio watching the world go by. The loco, you might remember, was originally sent out as the Urteno banker so it is usually double manned anyway. The loco currently acting as banker was seen in photo 5.33 and is the one that those crews transferred to. The loco on this train would also have needed a double crew, with a lot of time spent on the cushions, although the real thing seemed to accept this with equanimity. As has been hinted earlier these practices will have to be reviewed before the next session.

 

48103101263_3288941368_z.jpg5-184 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.183. The new train, ostensibly running in conjunction with the paper mill traffic, pulls into Lacono at 20.40, thereby delaying the adjacent railcar in platform 3. The train has been on the road for 10 hours but has failed to get past Ithilarak, a mere 18 kilometres distant.

 

Ian T

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Posted (edited)

The operating session finished some time ago but problems with the website platform prevented publication.

These have now been resolved (I hope!) and the last batch of pictures is available at https://myafk.net/operating-session-5

 

Incidentally I noticed that I had not included the location map on at least the last two posts. This has now been rectified..

Does any-one use this? It takes a long time to set up and unless I receive some requests for it to remain it will not be there on the next occasion!

 

48248231352_5d5627083a_z.jpg5-187 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.186 In this photo of an obscure corner of the layout the 2-10-2T backs down into the quarry road at Ospicio to pick up two vans jettisoned from an earlier train. This move is not carried out very often and the pony truck derailed on the siding points which were found to be out of adjustment. There is obviously a lot of work still to be done here, including inserting missing sleepers, but it is intended that the wall at the left will eventually become part of a loading bank.

 

48248145141_f1c1378b5b_z.jpg5-189 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.190 The congestion at Urteno has required that the wagons are written onto three shunt lists. At around two dozen wagons this would be nothing out of the ordinary for the prototype but it amounts to significant congestion on a cramped model railway. The value of these lists was pointed out in the last session. Rather than dealing with an unwieldy handful of consignment notes the destinations are simply written onto the sheet. The trajnaĉefo is, in general terms, simply interested in where the wagons are going rather than what is in them. The one urgent load, of livestock, is highlighted by the asterisks.

 

48248233177_eaac25bd84_z.jpg5-192 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.193 The last train of the day makes its way over the snow covered interfluve between Altonian and Calviero provinces. The eagle eyed will note that a slug of lead has appeared in the body of the locomotive testifying to the difficulties of working trains over the AFK. In fact closer inspection suggested that progress was being halted by the pilots attached to the bogies which were catching the sides of the cutting. These have been trimmed but the jury is out as to whether the weight will remain.

 

48248234107_e64394b098_z.jpg5-200 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

5.200 The down railcar is still on the single line, having reached Abateĵo de Narrasson. There is an IBS (intermediate block signal) at Sojonno so it is not in the section directly in advance of the freight, which could have left Boursson by now had it received authority. I suppose that the spire of the Abbey represents a scenic faux pas as it reaches above the sky but it would have looked just as unrealistic had it been shortened. The exit into the backscene will one day be hidden by a station building. The brethren are Cistercians and their agricultural machine shop is in the foreground. It houses a combine undergoing repair which is an obvious attempt to distract the eye from the hole.

 

As Capt Oates apparently said to Scott, "I'm going outside and may be some time."

The N gauge layouts need work and I have begun to rebuild the garden line.

 

Three or four items need attention on the AFK and that does not include stock building or scenic developments.

It may be some time before the AFK returns to these pages!

 

Ian T

Edited by ianathompson
factual error
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Ian, cricket does impact my modelling time too ( umpired for 520 overs in 76 says last week then watched an ODI at Durham. No wonder my layout has not got past the fiddle yard build stage.

Any chance of a line map as I get some of the locations confused.

Don't go away for too long ..keep us up to speed on developments and operating sessions.

Baz

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Barry,

 

Gave up on umpiring after arguing with the then second team captain following an lbw decision.

Spend most time scoring for the first team in the county premier. Will be watching Minor Counties next week hopefully.

 

About the railway!

The schematic line map (and the photo locations) should appear on the right of your screen.

I have been told that this does not come up, however, if viewed on a mobile phone.

 

The layout's supposed geographical location can be found at https://myafk.net/sketch-map-of-the-system

 

The schematic should be visible on any type of page if you go to https://myafk.net/operating-session-4

It has been placed at the top of the page.

 

Hope that this helps.

 

Ian T

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Ian

I may go back to scoring next year as  other than the women teams and most Grammar School teams the paid players cause a load of bother.

 

The map doesn't show on mytablet but I will check it out on my laptop later following an umpires meeting (discussion player  indiscipline...frabjoy!)

Baz

Update.. found it on the tablet on one of the pages

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The new operating session is now up and running.

Here are just a few of the photos that can be seen on the AFK website.

 

48882968217_bc5f368806_z.jpg6-06 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

6, The re-crewed cement train is now on the go and crosses Akvalando viaduct which spans the Carramasco Gorge. This train runs every other day on this path in the early morning. The backscene is one of the few improvements from the last time out. Ghealdaban village is prominent perched upon its rock outcrop, The hardboard at the right will eventually become a rock face, although I am quite keen to avoid a similar treatment at the other side of the gorge. Whether this it will be possible to achieve this whilst retaining scenic credibility is open to review at the moment.

 

48882251363_0d346aa405_z.jpg6-13 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

13. At just after 04.45 Fenditavalat receives its wake up call from the asthmatic diesel shunter which will frequent its streets for the remainder of the day. A van of cheese is being pulled from the dairy, which has roughly been sketched in using plastic sheet. The scene is a little more complete but it had been intended to pave the square between sessions. Some of the preliminary work to protect the point rods can be seen.

 

Hopefully the session will develop quite quickly, although it is possible that some construction work may be done in session.

The Rugby World Cup is also slowing progress.

 

Ian T

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The latest batch of photos can be found here.

 

The session is proving to be contrast to previous sessions in that everything is running smoothly "today".

 

How long that will last is open to debate!

 

48918815523_75b377c6ac_z.jpg6-19 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

19. The Fenditavalat goods usually passes straight through Boursson without stopping, thereby gaining 25 minutes on its booked time. Today it stops to transfer Sojonno bound traffic onto the down KTT goods. Sojonno's siding faces up trains and cannot be shunted by them. Wagons for Sojonno have to be marshalled at the front of the down train because of the steep gradient which means that they need to be on the rear of the up train. Here "the creature", complete with its own brake and that of the up train, is in the process of making the transfer. This procedure ensures that the load (sugar in this instance) reaches Sojonno in the morning rather than the late afternoon as would otherwise be the case.

 

48919345256_4e0fec8318_z.jpg6-30 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

31. Now that the wagons have gone we can get a clearer view of the quayside, to which the road vehicles have returned. The fish boxes and trays, and the lobster pots, were bought in industrial quantities, so much so, that one surprised trader at York exhibition years ago gave me a couple of free bike kits as well. That's where the one on top of the Lacono pilot came from! The boats are resin kits from a supplier reviewed in Railway Modeller during the nineties. I have no idea, at this remove, who it was but I bought a good number at the time in anticipation of needing them for a scene like this. The Vespa tricycle screams continental in contrast to the Land Rover and Ford parked on the quayside. The Russian bus model, redecorated to AFK colours, although currently displaying a Cyrillic destination, balances things. There is also, bought a great expense, an ice cream cart for the summer months. This came from a French supplier and is correctly configured for a left hand drive. The smoking kiln, in the background, indicates that fish are being kippered. The space behind the bus will be occupied by the Steam Boat, named for the Lossiemouth establishment where, I am assured by the cognoscenti, that you get thrown out for not fighting. There were on or two like that in Batley!

 

48919618247_beefd704df_z.jpg6-47 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

49. The down goods is on the move having crossed the schools' railcar. Here it is passing the fixed distant for Cadsuiane-Fanhuidol around the curve in the background. The control for the point giving access to the station siding sticks through the fascia.

 

Ian T

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glad to hear that "today" is going well.. lets hope the day continues in the same way.

 

Baz

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A rainy Saturday afternoon sees all local football cancelled so unusually I will post this weeks photos at this point.

They are available here with a small selection shown below.

 

48962603427_84401d8efb_z.jpg6-58 - Copy by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

60. Back in the little world (rather than the real one) the diesel shunts two empties into the wood yard siding which puts time into the down goods. This siding (deliberately) dips away at an alarming angle from the mainline and the loco's rear pony truck is almost level with the top of the nearest end of the open. Given the limited sightlines from the loco's elevated cab and the steep precipice beyond the bufferstop I imagine that this will be an adrenaline fuelled moment for the driver. Not for nothing is there a substantial bufferstop here rather than the AFK's standard casual baulk across the tracks if you are lucky!

 

48962605577_7d4430d550_z.jpg6-61 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

63. Its counterpart, working into the Orbon basin leaves a snowshed in the forests above Caladonno. I must get around to covering the cheapo trees with snow. One was done as an experiment and I liked the effect. Like everything it is making the time! The snow shed also needs some icicles adding as well as some snow on top.

 

48961873428_87b0084ca5_z.jpg6-75 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

77. Its up counterpart crossed it at Breĉo de Glissent. The train is loaded to the maximum 160 tons rating and plenty of loads had to be left behind. The loco struggled to pull the train up the hill from Relforka and was not helped by the heavy (Corgi) excavator on the front well wagon. In reality No 101 would most likely have been overwhelmed by such a load but, as it was the first AFK model ever built, it still holds down this duty out of sentiment.

 

Ian T

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Well that's been an absorbing and entertaining read while I'm sneezing and sniffling on a cold and wet Saturday afternoon.

 

An absolutely brilliant layout, from concept through construction to running, thanks v much for sharing.

 

I'm off to myafk now :good_mini:

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Thanks very much for the comment.

 

I try to balance stock building scenic work and operation, not always successfully!

 

Ian T

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After a little delay the latest photos of the session have been posted.

 

There are around thirty of them.

 

49018522807_71df91e0dd_z.jpg6-76 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

 78. The up local goods usually has an easy time of it at Glissent as a lot of the shunting is done by the railcar (photo 50) or by the down goods. The crew normally detach a cut of wagons, drop them into the siding, pick up a pre-sorted set of departing wagons and leave, but not today! The first two wagons in this shot were ready but the loco had to drop off the excavator and then work round to the glassworks to deliver a load of cullett (broken glass for re-melting) and pick up a van of bottles. This is the van at the left of the photo which is a CFS van. It has been deliberately loaded to go to Karamspur brewery as that is closer to the CFS than Glissent and part of its return journey can be charged to the consignee. In all probability it will pick up a load of beer going to the CFS or Fenditavalat over the next day or so and will thereby have paid for its journey home.

 

49017803268_e52b11120c_z.jpg6-81 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

83. Control's complaints to Head Office about the mayhem caused by the new paper factory's requirements have resulted in an experimental timetable change. A new train is now scheduled to leave Fenditavalat at around 09.30 with the objective of collecting the increased timber and coal traffic associated with the mill. The hitherto rarely seen vertical greens over horizontal greens aspect on the departure signal (obscured by the electrification mast unfortunately) will probably become more common in the future. It is also likely that the troublesome mallet will be allocated to this turn as well as it appears that it might be less taxing than the long distance goods. The (still unfinished) 0-8-0 has got the job today.

 

49018324951_c02bb2195d_z.jpg6-86 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

88. The Jakarutu train leaves the rack beside the high tarn. The Tegmentadelamondo is an area of the Altingablecaŭtoj as its name would suggest. (Roof of the World and High Reaches respectively.) It is subjected to the same snowstorms as the mainline but I chose to model the area in high summer. In the winter  these uplands would be in deep snow and the tarn would be as hard as rock. No shepherd with any brains would be anywhere near this remote spot. How does the railway remain open? The line is built on a slightly raised causeway so that the winds whipping across the plateau scour it of snow.

 

Ian T

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The latest batch of photos are available here.

Only a few of the photos are shown below.

 

49053609293_73365f849b_z.jpg6-107 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

109. The first railcar shuttle of the day from Lacono arrives at Varden around midday. This is another area of the timetable that might be looked at in future to evaluate whether there is space for an earlier run. For now any-one wishing to ski earlier must alight at Urteno and use the tramway system. Before this session the railcar whiled away a pleasant forty five minutes before departing for Urteno and Lacono. The new mill train has changed this procedure.

 

49053610193_9cec0b216d_z.jpg6-125 by Ian Thompson, on Flickr

 

127. It is some time since I set up the farm girls loading milk into the afternoon mixto's milk van. I really ought to do this more often as it demonstrates one of the reasons for the train's existence. At this time of the year the cattle are wintering in the lowlands so it is the valley stations that forward milk. Both the tractors are identical models but the far one has been subjected to extensive alterations. The 'crew' on the nearest one have been made from reworked Preiser models. On a practical note; the scene as portrayed would be rather unlikely given the proximity of the exposed signalling wires but this is just another example of turning a blind eye.

 

Ian T

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Unlikely ..but it makes a very real reason for the traffic flow!

 

Baz

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