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EMGS commissions Peco for RTR EM Gauge bullhead track/turnouts

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There's a saying, "Build it and they will come" but in this case perhaps it should be, "Build it and sell it through normal retail channels and they will come."

 

Mainstream rolling stock manufacturers are more likely to support EM if it too is (more) mainstream.

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For those not wanting to try Templot, here's a PDF file from Templot you can print containing straight B-6 turnout templates in EM:

 

attachicon.gifem_b6.pdf

 

I don't know whether EMGS have gone for regular or generic V-crossings. With generic as above they just scrape onto a single A4 page. (With regular they would be slightly shorter.)

 

When printing it, make sure to set the page scaling to 100% or None. (This is not the default setting in most PDF readers).

 

If your printer is struggling to fit that within the margins, here is the same thing split onto 2 pages:

 

em_b6_2pages.pdf

 

Trim to the red lines to fit them together.

 

Martin.

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And for those of us who have only ever bought Peco track.......what radius would a B6 point be?

 

I know they aren’t strictly measured as radii but an estimate would be useful?

 

The actual radius in the rails at its smallest (the middle part of the turnout) is 1217mm (47.9"), say 4ft rad.

 

The substitution radius for the whole turnout (which is the sort of figure Peco usually quote) is 1897mm (74.7"), say 6ft rad.

 

Martin.

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Wow, I'm really excited to see how this pans out - I've built track partway in 2mm-7mm but never managed a consistent, working result. I've invested quite alot in EM equipment and it's great to know that should the worst befall me, I could buy them off-the-shelf.

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Completely brilliant news!  I have only just started thinking about building the point work for my storage sidings and how best to do it - now I have my answer.  This really is a most positive move and I look forward to EM compatible locos and stock in due course - the forthcoming Dapol 63xx would be a most excellent place to start!

 

Gerry

Edited by Bulwell Hall
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I've heard this talked about by members of the EMGS board over the years and wow, suddenly it's here. Just a pity all the track is done on Wharfeside, quite a bit of it is with B6 points due to space constraints and although B6's are considered tight compared to the real thing there is no problem with buffer lock or knotted couplings.

 

Well done the EMGS board for working with PECO on this.

 

Dave Franks.

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The reason for the B6 was one of space. I'm sure you would agree that for someone starting out/trying EM, they wouldn't want to build a big layout or need lots of space for the track plan so the B6 seamed to be the best compromise. The long term plan is to add to the range with other points etc as and when we are able too as each point isn't small pocket change to produce.

 

 

Thanks

Simon

Simon,

 

my comment related to the availability of curved or Y points, slips and crossings, rather than the point "dimensions". B6 is a very sensible option, giving much more realistic track within a reasonable size.

 

Perhaps some of the other types will follow in due course, but if those that are inspired to move to EM can match the Peco/EMGS track with handbuilt  "options", it opens up the possibilities considerably.

 

Jol

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Wow!

That is something of a surprise, in the finest possible way!

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Utterly, utterly Brilliant news!

 

Thanks EMGS and Peco.

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That has settled it, I was going to use OO Bullhead on a small layout 1 loco 1 coach as a diorama type, so I think EM now would be good, for this one off.

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I am primarily 7mm but this might give me an excuse to have a small layout and the only Loco I think is worthy.....the Sutton’s magnificent CL24........hmm......always fancied EM as less “toy looking” than OO normal track, unfortunately I no longer have the dexterity to make/model fiddly stuff, this might just be the opportunity to get going again in a smaller gauge.

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There's a saying, "Build it and they will come" but in this case perhaps it should be, "Build it and sell it through normal retail channels and they will come."

 

Mainstream rolling stock manufacturers are more likely to support EM if it too is (more) mainstream.

 

Exactly my thinking. It would be so much better for prospective purchasers to see this hanging alongside the usual OO offerings - it will really spark a revolution then. And as you say Phil,. manufacturers will see it then too. 

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It's a good development. There's only one RTR EM loco though. Shall we open a book on how many RTR locos with a factory EM option there might be in five years time? Likewise rolling stock specifically made and sold as 'EM compatible'.

 

As someone returning to the hobby with I think (I hope) are reasonable modelling skills (I'll have a go at anything) but short on time, this is excellent news by PECO / EMGS.

 

I've yet to start building my layout, actually if truth be told, start designing it, and I'm now wondering if I should go down the EM route. However, whilst I'm happy to try modelling buildings, scenery etc, the conversion of RTR stock and locos would be a step too far, as its a skill I don't have and its time I don't have for all the modifications required to my stock.

 

So, if the manufacturer's were to offer EM bogies to swap out, that would be excellent news (and a bit of old fashioned 'joined-up-thinking' too). Understand that the steam era might be difficult but should be easier for the diesels surely (say's he with no knowledge of the implications, but I'll throw it out there anyway).

 

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The only diesels that i've had to buy wheels for are Hornby and Heljan. For Bachmann and Dapol I just pull the existing wheels out to gauge, you might have modify the brake shoes and pulls. Similarly most RTR stock accept replacement Gibson wheels, some require slight shaving of brake blocks. Accurascale wagons are designed to be EM friendly from the start.

 

Mike

Interesting, I didn't know that about the Bachmann and Dapol models. I'll have to check this out later. Thanks.

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This could be enough to finally tempt me over to EM gauge.

And as the second youngest member of the EMGS Board and the Expo EM North manager, this was one of the main reasons for its introduction

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As someone returning to the hobby with I think (I hope) are reasonable modelling skills (I'll have a go at anything) but short on time, this is excellent news by PECO / EMGS.

 

I've yet to start building my layout, actually if truth be told, start designing it, and I'm now wondering if I should go down the EM route. However, whilst I'm happy to try modelling buildings, scenery etc, the conversion of RTR stock and locos would be a step too far, as its a skill I don't have and its time I don't have for all the modifications required to my stock.

 

So, if the manufacturer's were to offer EM bogies to swap out, that would be excellent news (and a bit of old fashioned 'joined-up-thinking' too). Understand that the steam era might be difficult but should be easier for the diesels surely (say's he with no knowledge of the implications, but I'll throw it out there anyway).

 

 

For RTR stuff it's mostly the same concerns AFAIK, except with steam locos you need to deal with quartering, coupling rods and any outside valve gear. I've not attempted any of the latter so I can't speak for it's ease (or lack thereof) but for diesels it certainly is extremely simple - Ultrascale provide drop-in sets for everything, for example - just requires opening up the bogie and swapping them.

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Interesting, I didn't know that about the Bachmann and Dapol models. I'll have to check this out later. Thanks.

I have converted 20+ Bachmann locos to EM in a matter of minutes, normally no more than quarter of an hour......

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I am primarily 7mm but this might give me an excuse to have a small layout and the only Loco I think is worthy.....the Sutton’s magnificent CL24........hmm......always fancied EM as less “toy looking” than OO normal track, unfortunately I no longer have the dexterity to make/model fiddly stuff, this might just be the opportunity to get going again in a smaller gauge.

And of course you can buy them from that nice Mr Sutton for an extra £20....

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Does this bring EM modellers in to the same world as the rest of us mere mortals? Or should that be plonkers....?

 

Phil

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Does this bring EM modellers in to the same world as the rest of us mere mortals? Or should that be plonkers....?

 

Phil

Nah.......... :sungum:  :no:  :jester:

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When Bill (the current chairman of the EMGS and fellow Shipley MRS member) told me last week to check the EMGS web site today because I might read something of interest, I never guessed it would be anything like this!  I am delighted to hear this announcement.  Perhaps I should qualify that by saying I would have been delighted had I not, a year ago, spent two gruelling months building 50+ soldered (yes you've guessed it) B6 points for the fiddle yard on Clayton .  I could have built a couple of loco's instead

 

With regards how this will effect C&L I am not so sure that it will significantly as this (the Peco offering) is still generic trackwork by fine scale standards.  60ft panels became standard in later years but initially steel works could not produce 60ft rail lengths and almost every company had its own standard/s.  The track work on Clayton has been built to GN standards and comprises 3 bolt chairs, 45ft track panels on the main line and 20ft track panels in the yard.   The sleeper spacing is therefore bespoke to these panel lengths.  Whilst I would have welcomed the availability of the Peco point work for our fiddleyard I would still have proceeded to hand build track using C&L track components on the scenic section of our layout even if the Peco EM track work had been available at the time, especially as most of the points required were C7's rather than B6's.

 

Having said all that, well done EMGS and well done Peco.  And for the rest of you prospective EM gauge modellers - 'come on in the waters lovely'!

 

Frank

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For most RTR rolling stock, it's as simple as dropping/unclipping the OO wheelsets out and replacing with the equivalent EM wheelsets which are available from the trade (Alan Gibson, Kean-Maygib, etc). Takes less than a minute for a 4-wheel wagon.

 

For locos, yes - most diesels are much simpler and require a few simple tools, the most critical of which is an EM Gauge Back-to-Back gauge. On many of my Bachmann diesels I simply pull the wheels out to suit the new gauge, making sure the pull is equal on both sides and the b2b is a snug fit between the backs of the wheels. I think Dapol and Heljan can be done in similar fashion.

 

It's also possible to do similar to some Hornby diesels (the high-end 31, 50, 56) by drifting each wheel slightly along it's stub axle.

 

An alternative approach is to replace the RTR wheelsets with Keen-Maygib steel 14mm coach wheelsets, salvaging and re-using the gear and bearings from the RTR wheelsets.

 

And there's also the Ultrascale conversion sets (and similar sold via EMGS stores), though the cost is higher and the wait time (for Ultrascales at least) is much longer.

 

Steam locos, notably those with outside valve gear are more complex, a quartering tool is needed, but used with care, simpler inside-valve gear conversions are straightforward.

 

However, whilst I'm happy to try modelling buildings, scenery etc, the conversion of RTR stock and locos would be a step too far, as its a skill I don't have and its time I don't have for all the modifications required to my stock.

 

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